Pensions Photos on Townhall

  •  - Retired mine workers yell slogans during a protest in front of the Labour ministry in Lima

    Retired mine workers yell slogans during a protest in front of the Labour ministry in Lima

    Posted: 5/10/2012 1:51:49 PM EST
    Retired mine workers yell slogans during a protest in front of the Labour ministry in Lima May 10, 2012. Retired workers were demanding the government to increase their pensions by 20%. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - A retired mine worker who chained himself to a railing yells slogans during a protest in front of the Labour ministry in Lima

    A retired mine worker who chained himself to a railing yells slogans during a protest in front of the Labour ministry in Lima

    Posted: 5/10/2012 1:46:28 PM EST
    A retired mine worker who chained himself to a railing yells slogans during a protest in front of the Labour ministry in Lima May 10, 2012. Retired workers were demanding the government to increase their pensions by 20%. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT CIVIL UNREST)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/9/2012 12:05:48 AM EST
    Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., pauses for questions on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 8, 2012, as Senators went to the floor for a vote to cut off debate on federally subsidized loan interest rates and move to a final vote. Enzi is the top Republican on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/30/2012 12:10:45 PM EST
    In this Thursday, April 26, 2012 photo a Nazi-style poster with a Celtic cross replacing the swastika is displayed on the wall, left, as Giorgos Germanis, right, a candidate of the extreme far-right Golden Dawn party and an unidentified man are seen at a party office in the suburban town of Artemis, 25 kilometers (15 miles) east of Athens. Reeling from a vicious financial crisis that has cost them pensions and jobs, Greeks have been turning away in droves from the mainstream politicians they feel have let them down.Firmly on the fringe of the right since it first appeared 20 years ago, Golden Dawn garnered a meager 0.23 percent in the 2009 elections. But its popularity has shot up over the past few months and support stood at about 5 percent in recent opinion polls, well above the 3 percent threshold needed to enter parliament.(AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/30/2012 12:10:45 PM EST
    In this Thursday, April 26, 2012 photo a member of the extreme far-right Golden Dawn party hands out election pamphlets in the suburban town of Artemis, 25 kilometers (15 miles) east of Athens. Reeling from a vicious financial crisis that has cost them pensions and jobs, Greeks have been turning away in droves from the mainstream politicians they feel have let them down. Firmly on the fringe of the right since it first appeared 20 years ago, Golden Dawn garnered a meager 0.23 percent in the 2009 elections. But its popularity has shot up over the past few months and support stood at about 5 percent in recent opinion polls, well above the 3 percent threshold needed to enter parliament. Writing on shirt reads: "Golden Dawn, eastern Attica". (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/30/2012 12:10:45 PM EST
    In this Thursday, April 26, 2012 photo a man, right, reads a Golden Dawn party election pamphlet given to him by a party member, at a coffee shop in the suburban town of Artemis, 25 kilometers (15 miles) east of Athens, on Thursday, April 26, 2012. Reeling from a vicious financial crisis that has cost them pensions and jobs, Greeks have been turning away in droves from the mainstream politicians they feel have let them down.Firmly on the fringe of the right since it first appeared 20 years ago, Golden Dawn garnered a meager 0.23 percent in the 2009 elections. But its popularity has shot up over the past few months and support stood at about 5 percent in recent opinion polls, well above the 3 percent threshold needed to enter parliament. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/30/2012 12:10:45 PM EST
    In this Thursday April 26, 2012 photo Evlabia Spadidaki who used to vote for the mainstream parties says she will back the extreme far-right Golden down party in Greece's May 6 elections, in the suburban town of Artemis, 25 kilometers (15 miles) east of Athens. Reeling from a vicious financial crisis that has cost them pensions and jobs, Greeks have been turning away in droves from the mainstream politicians they feel have let them down. Firmly on the fringe of the right since it first appeared 20 years ago, Golden Dawn garnered a meager 0.23 percent in the 2009 elections. But its popularity has shot up over the past few months and support stood at about 5 percent in recent opinion polls, well above the 3 percent threshold needed to enter parliament. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/30/2012 12:10:45 PM EST
    In this Thursday April 26, 2012 photo Giorgos Germanis, a candidate of extreme far-right Golden Dawn party speaks during a interview with The Associated Press next to a banner with the twisting Maeander, an ancient Greek decorative motif that the party has adopted as its symbol, in the suburban town of Artemis, 25 kilometers (15 miles) east of Athens. Reeling from a vicious financial crisis that has cost them pensions and jobs, Greeks have been turning away in droves from the mainstream politicians they feel have let them down. Firmly on the fringe of the right since it first appeared 20 years ago, Golden Dawn garnered a meager 0.23 percent in the 2009 elections. But its popularity has shot up over the past few months and support stood at about 5 percent in recent opinion polls, well above the 3 percent threshold needed to enter parliament. Sign reads: "Golden". (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/30/2012 12:10:45 PM EST
    In this Thursday, April 26, 2012 photo members of extreme far-right Golden Dawn party walk on the street as part of an election campaign in the suburban town of Artemis, 25 kilometers (15 miles) east of Athens. Reeling from a vicious financial crisis that has cost them pensions and jobs, Greeks have been turning away in droves from the mainstream politicians they feel have let them down. Firmly on the fringe of the right since it first appeared 20 years ago, Golden Dawn garnered a meager 0.23 percent in the 2009 elections. But its popularity has shot up over the past few months and support stood at about 5 percent in recent opinion polls, well above the 3 percent threshold needed to enter parliament. Writing on shirt reads: "Golden Dawn, eastern Attica". (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/30/2012 12:10:45 PM EST
    In this Thursday, April 26, 2012 photo a member of far right wind Golden Dawn party stands in front of a photo of a party event at a memorial for the 480 B.C. Battle of Thermopylae at a party office in the suburban town of Artemis, 25 kilometers (15 miles) east of Athens. Reeling from a vicious financial crisis that has cost them pensions and jobs, Greeks have been turning away in droves from the mainstream politicians they feel have let them down. Firmly on the fringe of the right since it first appeared 20 years ago, Golden Dawn garnered a meager 0.23 percent in the 2009 elections. But its popularity has shot up over the past few months and support stood at about 5 percent in recent opinion polls, well above the 3 percent threshold needed to enter parliament. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/30/2012 12:10:44 PM EST
    In this Wednesday April 25, 2012 photo photo Ilias Kassidiaris, an agriculturist and candidate of the extreme far-right Golden Dawn party poses next a party flag _ styled on Nazi banners but with an ancient Greek motif in the center _ and a statuette of Alexander the Great at the party headquarters, in Athens. Reeling from a vicious financial crisis that has cost them pensions and jobs, Greeks have been turning away in droves from the mainstream politicians they feel have let them down. Firmly on the fringe of the right since it first appeared 20 years ago, Golden Dawn garnered a meager 0.23 percent in the 2009 elections. But its popularity has shot up over the past few months and support stood at about 5 percent in recent opinion polls, well above the 3 percent threshold needed to enter parliament.(AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/25/2012 7:25:47 PM EST
    Chrispin Sauter, member of the dissolved Haitian army, shows his army identification as he waits to register at the former military academy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, April 25, 2012. The Haitian government on Wednesday began to register hundreds of veterans so they can receive pensions and back pay but the effort fell short of trying to remove an armed rogue force from several old bases as its leaders clamor for the return of a military. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/25/2012 7:25:47 PM EST
    Mizaine Stavien, member of the dissolved Haitian army, shows his army identification as he waits to register at the former military academy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, April 25, 2012. The Haitian government on Wednesday began to register hundreds of veterans so they can receive pensions and back pay but the effort fell short of trying to remove an armed rogue force from several old bases as its leaders clamor for the return of a military. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/25/2012 7:25:46 PM EST
    Jean Claude Louis, member of the dissolved Haitian army, shows his army identification as he waits to register at the former military academy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, April 25, 2012. The Haitian government on Wednesday began to register hundreds of veterans so they can receive pensions and back pay but the effort fell short of trying to remove an armed rogue force from several old bases as its leaders clamor for the return of a military. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/25/2012 7:25:46 PM EST
    Members of the dissolved Haitian army greet each other as they wait to register at the former military academy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, April 25, 2012. The Haitian government on Wednesday began to register hundreds of veterans so they can receive pensions and back pay but the effort fell short of trying to remove an armed rogue force from several old bases as its leaders clamor for the return of a military. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
  •  - To match Feature FRANCE-ELECTION/YOUTH

    To match Feature FRANCE-ELECTION/YOUTH

    Posted: 4/12/2012 8:56:10 AM EST
    French university students and striking workers attend a demonstration over pension reform near the French Senate in Paris in this October 26, 2010 file photo. The flagship reform to make people work two years more for their pensions has met with fierce opposition in some of the most sustained protests in Europe to austerity measures aimed at reining in swollen deficits. The banner reads "Youths" and the placard reads "We demand respect and better social conditions". To match Feature FRANCE-ELECTION/YOUTH REUTERS/Benoit Tessier/Files (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS EDUCATION)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/9/2012 6:35:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2011, file photo Republican Senator of Utah Orrin Hatch, 78, serving in his sixth term on Capitol Hill, calls on the president to kick start a dormant U.S. trade agenda in Washington. The high profile Republican, who is the ranking member of the Senate Finance, a member of the Judiciary Committee, the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, and the Joint Committee on Taxation is a target of tea partyers trying to toss out veterans of the Republican establishment in the next election. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
  •  - File photo of a protester sleeping in front of Parliament and the Council of Ministers building in Sarajevo

    File photo of a protester sleeping in front of Parliament and the Council of Ministers building in Sarajevo

    Posted: 3/30/2012 1:42:07 PM EST
    A protester sleeps in front of Parliament and the Council of Ministers building in Sarajevo in this March 20, 2012 file photo. Bosnia's government bowed to 10 days of protests by war veterans from across the country's ethnic divide on Friday, agreeing to pay pensions promised more than a year ago. Picture taken March 20, 2012. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
  •  - File photo of protesters talking as they gather in front of Parliament and Council of Ministers building in Sarajevo

    File photo of protesters talking as they gather in front of Parliament and Council of Ministers building in Sarajevo

    Posted: 3/30/2012 1:40:37 PM EST
    Protesters talk as they gather in front of Parliament and the Council of Ministers building in Sarajevo in this March 20, 2012 file photo. Bosnia's government bowed to 10 days of protests by war veterans from across the country's ethnic divide on Friday, agreeing to pay pensions promised more than a year ago. Picture taken March 20, 2012. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Files (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - File photo of protesters playing cards as they gather in front of Parliament and Council of Ministers building in Sarajevo

    File photo of protesters playing cards as they gather in front of Parliament and Council of Ministers building in Sarajevo

    Posted: 3/30/2012 1:39:09 PM EST
    Protesters play cards as they gather in front of Parliament and the Council of Ministers building in Sarajevo in this March 20, 2012 file photo. Bosnia's government bowed to 10 days of protests by war veterans from across the country's ethnic divide on Friday, agreeing to pay pensions promised more than a year ago. Picture taken March 20, 2012. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Files (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)