Payroll tax cut Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2012, file photo, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio pauses while talking about an accord on the payroll tax cut negotiations during a news conference on Capitol

    FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2012, file photo, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio pauses while talking about an accord on the payroll tax cut negotiations during a news conference on Capitol

    Posted: 9/19/2012 3:08:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2012, file photo, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio pauses while talking about an accord on the payroll tax cut negotiations during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Just about every U.S. taxpayer is facing a significant tax increase next year, unless Congress and the White House can agree on a plan to extend a huge collection of tax cuts that expires at the end of the year. If Congress can’t agree on a plan to extend the Bush-era tax cuts, income tax rates would go up for people at every income level. Estate taxes and investment taxes would increase and the alternative minimum tax would hit millions of middle-income people. A payroll tax cut that has saved workers an average of about $1,000 a year in 2011 and 2012 would expire. Dozens of business tax breaks would go away. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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              FILE - In this July 25, 2012, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks to reporters just after Senate Democrats passed their version of a yearlong tax cut extension

    FILE - In this July 25, 2012, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks to reporters just after Senate Democrats passed their version of a yearlong tax cut extension

    Posted: 9/19/2012 3:08:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this July 25, 2012, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks to reporters just after Senate Democrats passed their version of a yearlong tax cut extension bill by a near party-line 51-48 vote, at the Capitol in Washington. At right is Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. Just about every U.S. taxpayer is facing a significant tax increase next year, unless Congress and the White House can agree on a plan to extend a huge collection of tax cuts that expires at the end of the year. If Congress can’t agree on a plan to extend the Bush-era tax cuts, income tax rates would go up for people at every income level. Estate taxes and investment taxes would increase and the alternative minimum tax would hit millions of middle-income people. A payroll tax cut that has saved workers an average of about $1,000 a year in 2011 and 2012 would expire. Dozens of business tax breaks would go away. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
  •  - File photo of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid pausing during his news conference in Washington

    File photo of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid pausing during his news conference in Washington

    Posted: 8/31/2012 5:06:36 AM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) pauses during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington in this December 23, 2011 file photo. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas/Files
  •  - File photo of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid pausing during his news conference in Washington

    File photo of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid pausing during his news conference in Washington

    Posted: 8/31/2012 5:06:36 AM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) pauses during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington in this December 23, 2011 file photo. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas/Files
  •  - File photo of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid pausing during his news conference in Washington

    File photo of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid pausing during his news conference in Washington

    Posted: 8/31/2012 5:06:36 AM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) pauses during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington in this December 23, 2011 file photo. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas/Files
  •  - File photo of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid pausing during his news conference in Washington

    File photo of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid pausing during his news conference in Washington

    Posted: 8/31/2012 5:06:36 AM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) pauses during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington in this December 23, 2011 file photo. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas/Files
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              FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2012, file photo, President Barack Obama, accompanied by Vice President Joe Biden, speaks in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex

    FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2012, file photo, President Barack Obama, accompanied by Vice President Joe Biden, speaks in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex

    Posted: 8/18/2012 11:08:20 AM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2012, file photo, President Barack Obama, accompanied by Vice President Joe Biden, speaks in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington, on the importance of the agreement passed by Congress to extend the payroll tax cut and unemployment insurance. In May, after Joe Biden tripped up his boss by voicing support for same-sex marriage while the president remained on the fence, there was speculation about whether the remarks were spontaneous or deliberate. But to those who know Biden, there was no doubt. He was just speaking his mind. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
  •  - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    Posted: 8/7/2012 1:05:55 AM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington December 23, 2011. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
  •  - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    Posted: 6/28/2012 2:02:36 PM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington December 23, 2011. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
  •  - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    Posted: 6/27/2012 5:38:51 PM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington December 23, 2011. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
  •  - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    Posted: 6/27/2012 4:43:51 PM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington December 23, 2011. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
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              FILE - In this April 16, 2012 file photo, a 2011 1040 tax form along with other income tax forms are seen at the entrance of the Illinois Department of Revenue in Springfield, Ill. Read

    FILE - In this April 16, 2012 file photo, a 2011 1040 tax form along with other income tax forms are seen at the entrance of the Illinois Department of Revenue in Springfield, Ill. Read

    Posted: 6/27/2012 2:13:34 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 16, 2012 file photo, a 2011 1040 tax form along with other income tax forms are seen at the entrance of the Illinois Department of Revenue in Springfield, Ill. Ready or not, big changes lie ahead for virtually every U.S. taxpayer next year. Tax cuts put into place under the Bush administration that slashed rates on wages, dividends and capital gains are set to expire at the end of 2012. The Social Security payroll tax cut enacted this year also will end, as will the exemption of millions of middle-class families from the alternative minimum tax. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
  •  - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    Posted: 6/27/2012 11:37:27 AM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington December 23, 2011. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
  •  - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    Posted: 6/26/2012 11:26:32 AM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington December 23, 2011. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
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    Posted: 6/11/2012 8:00:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2012, file photo, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va., accompanied by fellow GOP leaders House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., Cantor, and House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, to discuss the payroll tax cut negotiations. Republicans are calling it "Taxmageddon," the big tax increase awaiting nearly every American family at the end of the year, when a long list of tax cuts are scheduled to expire unless Congress acts. GOP leaders in Congress claim it would be "the largest tax increase in American history." Except it wouldn?t be, not when you take into account the big tax increases used to help pay for World War II. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
  •  - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    Posted: 5/15/2012 5:09:14 PM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington December 23, 2011. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
  •  - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Reid speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension in Washington

    Posted: 5/10/2012 5:21:58 PM EST
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during his news conference on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill in Washington December 23, 2011. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
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    Posted: 4/20/2012 1:30:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2012, file photo, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va., accompanied by fellow GOP leaders, gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, to discuss the payroll tax cut negotiations. From left are, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., Cantor, and House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. Republicans are using a House vote on tax cuts for nearly every employer in the country to make an election-year statement that they want to help companies create jobs. Democrats say the measure is merely the latest GOP effort to funnel federal help to those who are already successful. The GOP-run House was ready to approve the legislation on Thursday, April 19, 2012, in a vote lacking either suspense or any expectation that the plan would become law. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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    Posted: 4/16/2012 10:05:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 17, 2012, file photo House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, and Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, walk towards the House floor for the final vote on the payroll tax cut extension on Capitol Hill. Democrats and Republicans are forcing votes in Congress this week of April 2012 on competing tax plans that they know are doomed from the start. But little does that matter to either party. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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    Posted: 4/16/2012 10:05:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 16, 2012, file photo Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., left, reaches across the table to shake hands with Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., after bi-partisan House and Senate conferees signed a compromise agreement on the payroll tax cut extension. Democrats and Republicans are forcing votes in Congress this week in April 2012 on competing tax plans that they know are doomed from the start. But little does that matter to either party. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)