patience Photos on Townhall

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              German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures during a  press conference in Berlin, Germany, Friday, July 19, 2013. Chancellor Angela Merkel is acknowledging Germans have been unsettled by a

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures during a press conference in Berlin, Germany, Friday, July 19, 2013. Chancellor Angela Merkel is acknowledging Germans have been unsettled by a

    Posted: 7/19/2013 9:27:07 AM EST
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures during a press conference in Berlin, Germany, Friday, July 19, 2013. Chancellor Angela Merkel is acknowledging Germans have been unsettled by allegations of widespread U.S. surveillance though she insists patience is needed as officials seek answers from Washington. Merkel faced a barrage of questions about the National Security Agency's activities at a news conference Friday following a week in which her opponents have asserted she's doing too little to confront the U.S. and protect Germans' data. Germany holds elections Sept. 22 in which Merkel seeks a third term. (AP Photo/Gero Breloer)
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              German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures during her annual press conference in Berlin, Germany, Friday, July 19, 2013.  Chancellor Angela Merkel is acknowledging Germans have been unset

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures during her annual press conference in Berlin, Germany, Friday, July 19, 2013. Chancellor Angela Merkel is acknowledging Germans have been unset

    Posted: 7/19/2013 9:27:07 AM EST
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures during her annual press conference in Berlin, Germany, Friday, July 19, 2013. Chancellor Angela Merkel is acknowledging Germans have been unsettled by allegations of widespread U.S. surveillance though she insists patience is needed as officials seek answers from Washington. Merkel faced a barrage of questions about the National Security Agency's activities at a news conference Friday following a week in which her opponents have asserted she's doing too little to confront the U.S. and protect Germans' data. Germany holds elections Sept. 22 in which Merkel seeks a third term. (AP Photo/Gero Breloer)
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              FILE - In this May 28, 2013, photo, President Barack Obama reacts to his introduction by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in Asbury Park, N.J. One major principle of Obama's presidency th

    FILE - In this May 28, 2013, photo, President Barack Obama reacts to his introduction by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in Asbury Park, N.J. One major principle of Obama's presidency th

    Posted: 6/1/2013 3:13:05 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 28, 2013, photo, President Barack Obama reacts to his introduction by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in Asbury Park, N.J. One major principle of Obama's presidency that his foes love to hate _ that government, when it works right, can be best-equipped to aid and protect Americans _ is finding fresh currency among some Republicans. Obama walked side by side Christie, a fiscal conservative who has shown no patience for massive government spending _ except when it comes to billions in federal aid for his state after Superstorm Sandy. In fact, it was Christie and other Northeast Republicans who blasted members of their own party for insisting that Federal Emergency Management Agency aid be offset by cuts elsewhere in the federal budget. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
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              Swiss Finance Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf speaks during a press conference in Bern, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 29, 2013. The Swiss government says it will let banks circumvent the

    Swiss Finance Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf speaks during a press conference in Bern, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 29, 2013. The Swiss government says it will let banks circumvent the

    Posted: 5/29/2013 10:09:24 AM EST
    Swiss Finance Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf speaks during a press conference in Bern, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 29, 2013. The Swiss government says it will let banks circumvent the country's strict client secrecy laws as part of an effort to end a long-running tax evasion dispute with the United States. Widmer-Schlumpf says Switzerland is acting because U.S. patience with Swiss banks suspected of aiding American tax cheats is running out. (AP Photo/Keystone, Peter Schneider)
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              Swiss Finance Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf speaks during a press conference in Bern, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 29, 2013. The Swiss government says it will let banks circumvent the

    Swiss Finance Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf speaks during a press conference in Bern, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 29, 2013. The Swiss government says it will let banks circumvent the

    Posted: 5/29/2013 10:09:24 AM EST
    Swiss Finance Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf speaks during a press conference in Bern, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 29, 2013. The Swiss government says it will let banks circumvent the country's strict client secrecy laws as part of an effort to end a long-running tax evasion dispute with the United States. Widmer-Schlumpf says Switzerland is acting because U.S. patience with Swiss banks suspected of aiding American tax cheats is running out. (AP Photo/Keystone, Peter Schneider)
  •  - Noraziah Noor and Nurunisa Abu Bakar recite a prayer in Subang

    Noraziah Noor and Nurunisa Abu Bakar recite a prayer in Subang

    Posted: 3/3/2013 3:01:54 AM EST
    Noraziah Noor (seated L) and Nurunisa Abu Bakar (2nd R), the wives of Inspector Zulkifli Mamat and Corporal Sabarudin Daud respectively, who are the members of the Malaysian Police 69th Commando Battalion killed on Friday in the standoff between Malaysian security forces and armed followers of the Sultanate of Sulu, recite a prayer as they wait for the arrival of their bodies at an airport in Subang, outside Kuala Lumpur March 2, 2013. A standoff between Malaysian security forces and armed Filipinos ended in violence on Friday, with at least two police officers killed amid conflicting reports of casualties as Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak declared his patience had run out. Malaysian state news agency Bernama said that two police commandos had been killed in a mortar attack and two wounded after security forces tried to force out the group of at least 100 Filipinos who have been holed up in eastern Sabah state for more than two weeks. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad
  •  - Noraziah Noor and Nurunisa Abu Bakar recite a prayer in Subang

    Noraziah Noor and Nurunisa Abu Bakar recite a prayer in Subang

    Posted: 3/3/2013 3:01:54 AM EST
    Noraziah Noor (seated L) and Nurunisa Abu Bakar (2nd R), the wives of Inspector Zulkifli Mamat and Corporal Sabarudin Daud respectively, who are the members of the Malaysian Police 69th Commando Battalion killed on Friday in the standoff between Malaysian security forces and armed followers of the Sultanate of Sulu, recite a prayer as they wait for the arrival of their bodies at an airport in Subang, outside Kuala Lumpur March 2, 2013. A standoff between Malaysian security forces and armed Filipinos ended in violence on Friday, with at least two police officers killed amid conflicting reports of casualties as Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak declared his patience had run out. Malaysian state news agency Bernama said that two police commandos had been killed in a mortar attack and two wounded after security forces tried to force out the group of at least 100 Filipinos who have been holed up in eastern Sabah state for more than two weeks. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad
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              In this image made from a scene from the film “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape" released by Yojyu Matsubayashi, Kyoko Tanaka, a city council member of Minami Soma, patrols in

    In this image made from a scene from the film “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape" released by Yojyu Matsubayashi, Kyoko Tanaka, a city council member of Minami Soma, patrols in

    Posted: 2/27/2013 1:53:33 AM EST
    In this image made from a scene from the film “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape" released by Yojyu Matsubayashi, Kyoko Tanaka, a city council member of Minami Soma, patrols in the deserted town after evacuation of the residents, on April 3, 2011. Japanese film director Matsubayashi took a more standard documentary approach for his “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape,” interviewing people who were displaced in the Fukushima town of Minami Soma. He followed them into temporary shelters in cluttered gymnasiums and accompanied their harried visits to abandoned homes with the gentle patience of a video-journalist. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. (AP Photo/Yojyu Matsubayashi) MANDATORY CREDIT, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
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              In this Friday, Sept. 7, 2012 photo, Japanese film director Yojyu Matsubayashi speaks during an interview in Tokyo. Matsubayashi took a more standard documentary approach for his “Fukus

    In this Friday, Sept. 7, 2012 photo, Japanese film director Yojyu Matsubayashi speaks during an interview in Tokyo. Matsubayashi took a more standard documentary approach for his “Fukus

    Posted: 2/27/2013 1:53:33 AM EST
    In this Friday, Sept. 7, 2012 photo, Japanese film director Yojyu Matsubayashi speaks during an interview in Tokyo. Matsubayashi took a more standard documentary approach for his “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape,” interviewing people who were displaced in the Fukushima town of Minami Soma. He followed them into temporary shelters in cluttered gymnasiums and accompanied their harried visits to abandoned homes with the gentle patience of a video-journalist. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
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              FILE - In this April 7, 2011 file photo, Japanese police wearing protective radiation suits search for the bodies of victims of the tsunami in the Odaka area of Minami Soma, inside the

    FILE - In this April 7, 2011 file photo, Japanese police wearing protective radiation suits search for the bodies of victims of the tsunami in the Odaka area of Minami Soma, inside the

    Posted: 2/27/2013 1:53:33 AM EST
    FILE - In this April 7, 2011 file photo, Japanese police wearing protective radiation suits search for the bodies of victims of the tsunami in the Odaka area of Minami Soma, inside the deserted evacuation zone established for the 20-kilometer radius around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants. Japanese film director Yojyu Matsubayashi took a more standard documentary approach for his “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape,” interviewing people who were displaced in the Fukushima town of Minami Soma. He followed them into temporary shelters in cluttered gymnasiums and accompanied their harried visits to abandoned homes with the gentle patience of a video-journalist. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder, File)
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              FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2012 file photo, baseball union head Michael Weiner speaks during a news conference in New York. Weiner says, Monday Feb. 25, 2013,  there's active discussion ab

    FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2012 file photo, baseball union head Michael Weiner speaks during a news conference in New York. Weiner says, Monday Feb. 25, 2013, there's active discussion ab

    Posted: 2/25/2013 6:43:27 PM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2012 file photo, baseball union head Michael Weiner speaks during a news conference in New York. Weiner says, Monday Feb. 25, 2013, there's active discussion about increasing the penalties for violating baseball's drug testing program. Weiner says players have very little patience for seeing their peers try to cheat the system. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
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              In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a North Korean soldier stands guard on the river bank of the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong, China. China’s patien

    In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a North Korean soldier stands guard on the river bank of the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong, China. China’s patien

    Posted: 2/12/2013 1:38:37 AM EST
    In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a North Korean soldier stands guard on the river bank of the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong, China. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin, and a widely-expected nuclear weapons test by the latter could bring that frustration to a head. Beijing signaled its growing unhappiness by agreeing to tightened U.N. sanctions after North Korea launched a rocket in December, eliciting harsh criticism from Pyongyang and comment from China watchers surprised by Beijing’s unusually tough line. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
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              In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a North Korean soldier stands guard on the river bank of the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong. China’s patience with

    In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a North Korean soldier stands guard on the river bank of the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong. China’s patience with

    Posted: 2/12/2013 1:38:37 AM EST
    In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a North Korean soldier stands guard on the river bank of the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin, and a widely-expected nuclear weapons test by the latter could bring that frustration to a head. Beijing signaled its growing unhappiness by agreeing to tightened U.N. sanctions after North Korea launched a rocket in December, eliciting harsh criticism from Pyongyang and comment from China watchers surprised by Beijing’s unusually tough line.(AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
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              In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, a picture of Mao Zedong, founder of the People's Republic of China, right, and North Korea's late leader Kim Il Sung is displayed on the Hekou Bridge, which

    In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, a picture of Mao Zedong, founder of the People's Republic of China, right, and North Korea's late leader Kim Il Sung is displayed on the Hekou Bridge, which

    Posted: 2/11/2013 2:23:42 AM EST
    In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, a picture of Mao Zedong, founder of the People's Republic of China, right, and North Korea's late leader Kim Il Sung is displayed on the Hekou Bridge, which once linked China and North Korea before it was bombed in the 1950's during the Korean War, in Hekou, China. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin, and a widely-expected nuclear weapons test by the latter could bring that frustration to a head. Beijing signaled its growing unhappiness by agreeing to tightened U.N. sanctions after North Korea launched a rocket in December, eliciting harsh criticism from Pyongyang and comment from China watchers surprised by Beijing’s unusually tough line. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
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              In this Feb. 7, 2013 file photo, the Friendship Bridge, left, linking China and North Korea, and the Yalu River Bridge, right, which was bombed in the 1950's during the Korean War, are

    In this Feb. 7, 2013 file photo, the Friendship Bridge, left, linking China and North Korea, and the Yalu River Bridge, right, which was bombed in the 1950's during the Korean War, are

    Posted: 2/11/2013 2:23:42 AM EST
    In this Feb. 7, 2013 file photo, the Friendship Bridge, left, linking China and North Korea, and the Yalu River Bridge, right, which was bombed in the 1950's during the Korean War, are seen before daybreak in Dandong, China, opposite the North Korean border town of Sinuiju. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin, and a widely-expected nuclear weapons test by the latter could bring that frustration to a head. Beijing signaled its growing unhappiness by agreeing to tightened U.N. sanctions after North Korea launched a rocket in December, eliciting harsh criticism from Pyongyang and comment from China watchers surprised by Beijing’s unusually tough line. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
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              In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, a Chinese woman sells North Korean souvenirs in Dandong, China, opposite the North Korean town of Sinuiju. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin,

    In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, a Chinese woman sells North Korean souvenirs in Dandong, China, opposite the North Korean town of Sinuiju. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin,

    Posted: 2/11/2013 2:23:42 AM EST
    In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, a Chinese woman sells North Korean souvenirs in Dandong, China, opposite the North Korean town of Sinuiju. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin, and a widely-expected nuclear weapons test by the latter could bring that frustration to a head. Beijing signaled its growing unhappiness by agreeing to tightened U.N. sanctions after North Korea launched a rocket in December, eliciting harsh criticism from Pyongyang and comment from China watchers surprised by Beijing’s unusually tough line. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
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              In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, an unfinished bridge linking China and North Korea, is seen in Dandong, China, opposite the North Korean border town of Sinuiju. China’s patience with North

    In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, an unfinished bridge linking China and North Korea, is seen in Dandong, China, opposite the North Korean border town of Sinuiju. China’s patience with North

    Posted: 2/11/2013 2:23:42 AM EST
    In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, an unfinished bridge linking China and North Korea, is seen in Dandong, China, opposite the North Korean border town of Sinuiju. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin, and a widely-expected nuclear weapons test by the latter could bring that frustration to a head. Beijing signaled its growing unhappiness by agreeing to tightened U.N. sanctions after North Korea launched a rocket in December, eliciting harsh criticism from Pyongyang and comment from China watchers surprised by Beijing’s unusually tough line. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
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              In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a Chinese tourist looks at a newly erected border fence in Dandong, China, opposite the North Korean border town of Sinuiju. China’s patience with North Kore

    In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a Chinese tourist looks at a newly erected border fence in Dandong, China, opposite the North Korean border town of Sinuiju. China’s patience with North Kore

    Posted: 2/11/2013 2:23:42 AM EST
    In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a Chinese tourist looks at a newly erected border fence in Dandong, China, opposite the North Korean border town of Sinuiju. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin, and a widely-expected nuclear weapons test by the latter could bring that frustration to a head. Beijing signaled its growing unhappiness by agreeing to tightened U.N. sanctions after North Korea launched a rocket in December, eliciting harsh criticism from Pyongyang and comment from China watchers surprised by Beijing’s unusually tough line. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
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              In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a North Korean farmer brings his cattle to the river bank of the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong. China’s patience

    In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a North Korean farmer brings his cattle to the river bank of the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong. China’s patience

    Posted: 2/11/2013 2:23:42 AM EST
    In this Feb. 6, 2013 photo, a North Korean farmer brings his cattle to the river bank of the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin, and a widely-expected nuclear weapons test by the latter could bring that frustration to a head. Beijing signaled its growing unhappiness by agreeing to tightened U.N. sanctions after North Korea launched a rocket in December, eliciting harsh criticism from Pyongyang and comment from China watchers surprised by Beijing’s unusually tough line. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
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              In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, a picture of Mao Zedong, founder of the People's Republic of China, right, and North Korea's late leader Kim Il Sung, left, is displayed on the Hekou Bridge,

    In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, a picture of Mao Zedong, founder of the People's Republic of China, right, and North Korea's late leader Kim Il Sung, left, is displayed on the Hekou Bridge,

    Posted: 2/11/2013 2:23:42 AM EST
    In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, a picture of Mao Zedong, founder of the People's Republic of China, right, and North Korea's late leader Kim Il Sung, left, is displayed on the Hekou Bridge, which once linked China and North Korea before it was bombed in the 1950's during the Korean War, in Hekou, China. China’s patience with North Korea is wearing thin, and a widely-expected nuclear weapons test by the latter could bring that frustration to a head. Beijing signaled its growing unhappiness by agreeing to tightened U.N. sanctions after North Korea launched a rocket in December, eliciting harsh criticism from Pyongyang and comment from China watchers surprised by Beijing’s unusually tough line. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)