Partisanship Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this May 22, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama pauses while speaking in the East Room of the White House in Washington. For President Barack Obama, the opening months of

    FILE - In this May 22, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama pauses while speaking in the East Room of the White House in Washington. For President Barack Obama, the opening months of

    Posted: 5/29/2013 8:06:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 22, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama pauses while speaking in the East Room of the White House in Washington. For President Barack Obama, the opening months of his second term have been a frustrating reminder of the limits of presidential power and the relentless Washington political apparatus he disdains. Obama has yet to score a legislative victory or change the bitter political partisanship he promised to fix _ both efforts that may get tougher as the White House contends with three major controversies. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
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              This photograph taken on Saturday, May 11, 2103, in Portland, Maine, shows the cover of former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe's new book, which is being released Tuesday. Snowe's book is a cal

    This photograph taken on Saturday, May 11, 2103, in Portland, Maine, shows the cover of former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe's new book, which is being released Tuesday. Snowe's book is a cal

    Posted: 5/12/2013 9:13:44 AM EST
    This photograph taken on Saturday, May 11, 2103, in Portland, Maine, shows the cover of former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe's new book, which is being released Tuesday. Snowe's book is a call to action to end what she calls excessive partisanship in Congress. (AP Photo/Clarke Canfield)
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              This photograph taken on Saturday, May 11, 2103, in Portland, Maine, shows the cover of former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe's new book, which is being released Tuesday. Snowe's book is a cal

    This photograph taken on Saturday, May 11, 2103, in Portland, Maine, shows the cover of former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe's new book, which is being released Tuesday. Snowe's book is a cal

    Posted: 5/12/2013 8:56:01 AM EST
    This photograph taken on Saturday, May 11, 2103, in Portland, Maine, shows the cover of former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe's new book, which is being released Tuesday. Snowe's book is a call to action to end what she calls excessive partisanship in Congress. (AP Photo/Clarke Canfield)
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              In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, speaks at a town hall meeting in Montgomery, Ohio. Here in Cincinnati's suburbs, where people tend to be polite, one finds

    In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, speaks at a town hall meeting in Montgomery, Ohio. Here in Cincinnati's suburbs, where people tend to be polite, one finds

    Posted: 3/30/2013 9:18:32 AM EST
    In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, speaks at a town hall meeting in Montgomery, Ohio. Here in Cincinnati's suburbs, where people tend to be polite, one finds seeds of the bitter partisanship that gnaws at Washington 500 miles away. If any Republican House members might be open to compromise with President Barack Obama and Democratic lawmakers, Chabot would seem near the top. Yet he toes an unyielding conservative line on virtually every big issue. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
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              In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, takes time after his town hall meeting to answer questions one-on-one with constituents in Montgomery, Ohio. Here in the C

    In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, takes time after his town hall meeting to answer questions one-on-one with constituents in Montgomery, Ohio. Here in the C

    Posted: 3/30/2013 9:18:32 AM EST
    In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, takes time after his town hall meeting to answer questions one-on-one with constituents in Montgomery, Ohio. Here in the Cincinnati suburbs, where people tend to be polite, one finds seeds of the bitter partisanship that gnaws at Washington, 500 miles away. If any Republican House members might be open to compromise with President Barack Obama and Democratic lawmakers, Chabot would seem near the top. Yet he toes an unyielding conservative line on virtually every big issue. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
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              In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, listens to constituents' questions at a town hall meeting in Montgomery, Ohio. Here in the Cincinnati suburbs, where peopl

    In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, listens to constituents' questions at a town hall meeting in Montgomery, Ohio. Here in the Cincinnati suburbs, where peopl

    Posted: 3/30/2013 9:18:32 AM EST
    In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, listens to constituents' questions at a town hall meeting in Montgomery, Ohio. Here in the Cincinnati suburbs, where people tend to be polite, one finds seeds of the bitter partisanship that gnaws at Washington, 500 miles away. If any Republican House members might be open to compromise with President Barack Obama and Democratic lawmakers, Chabot would seem near the top. Yet he toes an unyielding conservative line on virtually every big issue. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
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              In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, uses a chart to talk about the U.S. budget deficit during a town hall meeting with constituents in Montgomery, Ohio. Here

    In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, uses a chart to talk about the U.S. budget deficit during a town hall meeting with constituents in Montgomery, Ohio. Here

    Posted: 3/30/2013 9:18:32 AM EST
    In this photo taken March 25, 2013, Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, uses a chart to talk about the U.S. budget deficit during a town hall meeting with constituents in Montgomery, Ohio. Here in the Cincinnati suburbs, where people tend to be polite, one finds seeds of the bitter partisanship that gnaws at Washington, 500 miles away. If any Republican House members might be open to compromise with President Barack Obama and Democratic lawmakers, Chabot would seem near the top. Yet he toes an unyielding conservative line on virtually every big issue. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
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              FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., right, confer as they and a bipartisan group of other leading senators announ

    FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., right, confer as they and a bipartisan group of other leading senators announ

    Posted: 3/9/2013 1:18:22 PM EST
    FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., right, confer as they and a bipartisan group of other leading senators announce their agreement on the principles of sweeping legislation to rewrite the nation's immigration laws during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington. Eight senators meet in private several times a week, alternating between McCain’s and Schumer’s offices, and in a capital riven by partisanship and gridlock, they are determined to be the exception and actually get something done. This is immigration reform's "Gang of Eight". Others in the group, not shown here, are Sen.s Marco Rubio, R-Fla., Robert Menendez, D-N.J., Lindsey Graham, R–S.C., Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Michael Bennet, D-Colo. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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              FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center,speaks at a Capitol Hill news conference with a bipartisan group of leading senators to announce their agreemen

    FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center,speaks at a Capitol Hill news conference with a bipartisan group of leading senators to announce their agreemen

    Posted: 3/9/2013 1:18:22 PM EST
    FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center,speaks at a Capitol Hill news conference with a bipartisan group of leading senators to announce their agreement on the principles of sweeping legislation to rewrite the nation's immigration laws. Eight senators meet in private several times a week, alternating between, from left, Sen. John McCain’s, R-Ariz., and Sen. Charles Schumer’s, D-N.Y., offices, and in a capital riven by partisanship and gridlock, they are determined to be the exception and actually get something done. This is immigration reform's " Gang of Eight". At right is Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., The group includes Sen.s Lindsey Graham, R–S.C., Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Michael Bennet, D-Colo., not shown here. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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              In this photo taken Feb. 7, 2013, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. gestures as he speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Bar

    In this photo taken Feb. 7, 2013, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. gestures as he speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Bar

    Posted: 2/19/2013 7:08:26 PM EST
    In this photo taken Feb. 7, 2013, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. gestures as he speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Barack Obama’s “backup” immigration bill may have angered Republicans but it could spur GOP lawmakers to rally behind a similar plan of their own rather than support legislation with Obama’s name attached. Although a key Republican says Obama's draft bill injects partisanship into the process, all parties say bipartisan talks are moving forward. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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              FILE - This Dec. 16, 2012 file photo shows President Barack Obama pausing as he speaks during an interfaith vigil for the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, at Newtow

    FILE - This Dec. 16, 2012 file photo shows President Barack Obama pausing as he speaks during an interfaith vigil for the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, at Newtow

    Posted: 1/17/2013 12:43:32 PM EST
    FILE - This Dec. 16, 2012 file photo shows President Barack Obama pausing as he speaks during an interfaith vigil for the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, at Newtown High School in Newtown, Conn. Four years after he was the fifth-youngest president to take the oath of office, Barack Obama now is 51, his hair more gray, his face more lined. The changes aren't all physical: As he enters Term Two, he is sounding more confident, vowing a harder line on negotiations, relying more on trusted allies, promising less, expressing more cynicism about the grip of partisanship on Washington. And perhaps most important, he seems more convinced of a need to keep the public with him, coming full circle to his people-driven 2008 campaign. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
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              FILE - This Jan. 20, 2009 file photo shows President Barack Obama delivering his inaugural address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Four years after he was the fifth-youngest president to

    FILE - This Jan. 20, 2009 file photo shows President Barack Obama delivering his inaugural address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Four years after he was the fifth-youngest president to

    Posted: 1/17/2013 12:43:32 PM EST
    FILE - This Jan. 20, 2009 file photo shows President Barack Obama delivering his inaugural address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Four years after he was the fifth-youngest president to take the oath of office, Barack Obama now is 51, his hair more gray, his face more lined. The changes aren't all physical: As he enters Term Two, he is sounding more confident, vowing a harder line on negotiations, relying more on trusted allies, promising less, expressing more cynicism about the grip of partisanship on Washington. And perhaps most important, he seems more convinced of a need to keep the public with him, coming full circle to his people-driven 2008 campaign. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
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              FILE - This Dec. 14, 2012 file photo shows President Barack Obama pausing as he speaks about the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., in the briefing room of the White House in Washington

    FILE - This Dec. 14, 2012 file photo shows President Barack Obama pausing as he speaks about the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., in the briefing room of the White House in Washington

    Posted: 1/17/2013 12:43:32 PM EST
    FILE - This Dec. 14, 2012 file photo shows President Barack Obama pausing as he speaks about the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., in the briefing room of the White House in Washington. Four years after he was the fifth-youngest president to take the oath of office, Barack Obama now is 51, his hair more gray, his face more lined. The changes aren't all physical: As he enters Term Two, he is sounding more confident, vowing a harder line on negotiations, relying more on trusted allies, promising less, expressing more cynicism about the grip of partisanship on Washington. And perhaps most important, he seems more convinced of a need to keep the public with him, coming full circle to his people-driven 2008 campaign. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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              FILE - These file photos, Oct. 7, 2009, left, and Nov. 28, 2012, right, shows President Barack Obama speaking in Washington. Four years after he was the fifth-youngest president to take

    FILE - These file photos, Oct. 7, 2009, left, and Nov. 28, 2012, right, shows President Barack Obama speaking in Washington. Four years after he was the fifth-youngest president to take

    Posted: 1/17/2013 12:43:32 PM EST
    FILE - These file photos, Oct. 7, 2009, left, and Nov. 28, 2012, right, shows President Barack Obama speaking in Washington. Four years after he was the fifth-youngest president to take the oath of office, Barack Obama now is 51, his hair more gray, his face more lined. The changes aren't all physical: As he enters Term Two, he is sounding more confident, vowing a harder line on negotiations, relying more on trusted allies, promising less, expressing more cynicism about the grip of partisanship on Washington. And perhaps most important, he seems more convinced of a need to keep the public with him, coming full circle to his people-driven 2008 campaign. (AP Photo, File)
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              FILE - In this May 8, 2012 file photo, Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The substitute ethics panel that investigated Rep. Maxine Waters, a senior Demo

    FILE - In this May 8, 2012 file photo, Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The substitute ethics panel that investigated Rep. Maxine Waters, a senior Demo

    Posted: 9/25/2012 3:13:39 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 8, 2012 file photo, Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The substitute ethics panel that investigated Rep. Maxine Waters, a senior Democrat, issued a stinging rebuke of the permanent House Ethics Committee Tuesday with a declaration that its members need to step aside from partisanship when judging member conduct. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
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    Posted: 10/15/2011 3:25:55 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 9, 2009 file photo, U.S. Rep. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., speaks at a news conference in Wolcott, Conn. Murphy and Rep. Timothy Johnson, R-Ill., are bucking the trend of partisanship in Washington and holding joint town hall meetings with their constituents _ gatherings that were known for their rancor during the health care debate. Both have worked to breathe new life into the U.S. House of Representatives Center Aisle Caucus, a bipartisan group that is trying improve the tone in D.C. amid a hyper-partisan atmosphere. (AP Photo/Bob Child, File)
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    Posted: 5/8/2011 8:55:46 AM EST
    Former U.S. Ambassador to China and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman applauds at the commencement ceremony at the University of South Carolina on Saturday, May 7 2011 in Columbia, S.C. Huntsman, weighing a Republican White House bid, used his first formal event after stepping down as President Barack Obama's ambassador to China to confront the line on his resume that conservatives were mostly likely to declare a deal-breaker. In a high-profile speech to the University of South Carolina, Huntsman said patriotism should trump partisanship and defended his two years in Beijing as the Democratic administration's top diplomat. (AP Photo/Mary Ann Chastain)
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    Posted: 5/8/2011 8:55:46 AM EST
    Former U.S. Ambassador to China and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman adresses the audience at the commencement ceremony for the University of South Carolina on Saturday, May 7 2011 in Columbia, S.C. Huntsman, weighing a Republican White House bid, used his first formal event after stepping down as President Barack Obama's ambassador to China to confront the line on his resume that conservatives were mostly likely to declare a deal-breaker. In the high-profile speech to the University of South Carolina, Huntsman said patriotism should trump partisanship and defended his two years in Beijing as the Democratic administration's top diplomat. (AP Photo/Mary Ann Chastain)
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    Posted: 5/8/2011 8:55:46 AM EST
    Former U.S. Ambassador to China and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman speaks at the commencement ceremony for the University of South Carolina on Saturday, May 7 2011 in Columbia, S.C. Huntsman, weighing a Republican White House bid, used his first formal event after stepping down as President Barack Obama's ambassador to China to confront the line on his resume that conservatives were mostly likely to declare a deal-breaker. In a high-profile speech to the University of South Carolina, Huntsman said patriotism should trump partisanship and defended his two years in Beijing as the Democratic administration's top diplomat. (AP Photo/Mary Ann Chastain)
  •  - Kenya's President Kibaki listens as a traditional preacher prays during the official opening of the Kenyan parliament in Nairobi

    Kenya's President Kibaki listens as a traditional preacher prays during the official opening of the Kenyan parliament in Nairobi

    Posted: 3/6/2008 9:42:04 AM EST
    Kenya's President Mwai Kibaki (L) listens as a traditional preacher prays during the official opening of the Kenyan parliament in Nairobi March 6, 2008. Kibaki urged Kenya's divided parliament on Thursday to set aside partisanship and enshrine into law a power-sharing pact to end a bloody post-election crisis. REUTERS/Antony Njuguna (KENYA)