one-child policy Photos on Townhall

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              In this photo taken Thursday, July 25, 2013, a nurse holds Baby Liang in a hospital where she was born in Beijing. Born hours after Britain’s Prince George was delivered in London, she

    In this photo taken Thursday, July 25, 2013, a nurse holds Baby Liang in a hospital where she was born in Beijing. Born hours after Britain’s Prince George was delivered in London, she

    Posted: 7/27/2013 10:47:21 AM EST
    In this photo taken Thursday, July 25, 2013, a nurse holds Baby Liang in a hospital where she was born in Beijing. Born hours after Britain’s Prince George was delivered in London, she is called only by her father Liang Chen’s surname since her parents haven’t named her yet. Families around the world see their children as little princes and princesses, but it’s especially so in China, where the government’s strict one-child policy dating back to around 1980 spawned a generation of "little emperors," only children doted on as the family’s sole future. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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              A parent takes photos of her daughter playing the drums at a children's play area in a shopping mall in Beijing Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013. In China, a law generally limits urban families

    A parent takes photos of her daughter playing the drums at a children's play area in a shopping mall in Beijing Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013. In China, a law generally limits urban families

    Posted: 1/10/2013 3:43:35 PM EST
    A parent takes photos of her daughter playing the drums at a children's play area in a shopping mall in Beijing Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013. In China, a law generally limits urban families to having just one child. They grow up as the sole focus of doting parents. How does this affect them? What does it mean to Chinese society if generations of kids are raised this way? Authors of a new study say the one-child policy has significant ramifications for Chinese society. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)
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              A girl, background center, talks to her mother as she sees other parents, foreground, tying shoes for their children at a children's play area in a shopping mall in Beijing Thursday, Ja

    A girl, background center, talks to her mother as she sees other parents, foreground, tying shoes for their children at a children's play area in a shopping mall in Beijing Thursday, Ja

    Posted: 1/10/2013 3:43:35 PM EST
    A girl, background center, talks to her mother as she sees other parents, foreground, tying shoes for their children at a children's play area in a shopping mall in Beijing Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013. In China, a law generally limits urban families to having just one child. They grow up as the sole focus of doting parents. How does this affect them? What does it mean to Chinese society if generations of kids are raised this way? Authors of a new study say the one-child policy has significant ramifications for Chinese society. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)
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              Parents play with their children at a kid's play area in a shopping mall in Beijing Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013. In China, a law generally limits urban families to having just one child. Th

    Parents play with their children at a kid's play area in a shopping mall in Beijing Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013. In China, a law generally limits urban families to having just one child. Th

    Posted: 1/10/2013 3:43:35 PM EST
    Parents play with their children at a kid's play area in a shopping mall in Beijing Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013. In China, a law generally limits urban families to having just one child. They grow up as the sole focus of doting parents. How does this affect them? What does it mean to Chinese society if generations of kids are raised this way? Authors of a new study say the one-child policy has significant ramifications for Chinese society. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)
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              Chinese women bring their children to the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think tank says China should start phasing out its one-child policy immediately an

    Chinese women bring their children to the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think tank says China should start phasing out its one-child policy immediately an

    Posted: 10/31/2012 3:13:28 AM EST
    Chinese women bring their children to the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think tank says China should start phasing out its one-child policy immediately and allow two children for every family by 2015. It remains unclear whether Chinese leaders are ready to take that step. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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              Kindergarten teachers play with children during an outdoor activity at the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think tank says China should start phasing out it

    Kindergarten teachers play with children during an outdoor activity at the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think tank says China should start phasing out it

    Posted: 10/31/2012 3:13:28 AM EST
    Kindergarten teachers play with children during an outdoor activity at the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think tank says China should start phasing out its one-child policy immediately and allow two children for every family by 2015. It remains unclear whether Chinese leaders are ready to take that step. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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              A Chinese woman performs a morning exercise next to a family members having a light moment with their infant at the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think ta

    A Chinese woman performs a morning exercise next to a family members having a light moment with their infant at the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think ta

    Posted: 10/31/2012 3:13:28 AM EST
    A Chinese woman performs a morning exercise next to a family members having a light moment with their infant at the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think tank says China should start phasing out its one-child policy immediately and allow two children for every family by 2015. It remains unclear whether Chinese leaders are ready to take that step. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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              A Chinese woman plays with her grandchild at the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think tank says China should start phasing out its one-child policy immedia

    A Chinese woman plays with her grandchild at the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think tank says China should start phasing out its one-child policy immedia

    Posted: 10/31/2012 3:13:28 AM EST
    A Chinese woman plays with her grandchild at the Ritan Park in Beijing Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. A government think tank says China should start phasing out its one-child policy immediately and allow two children for every family by 2015. It remains unclear whether Chinese leaders are ready to take that step. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
  •  - Yuefeng stands in elevator of her apartment building at Cherish Yearn care center facility in Shanghai

    Yuefeng stands in elevator of her apartment building at Cherish Yearn care center facility in Shanghai

    Posted: 10/1/2012 6:02:17 AM EST
    Zhu Yuefeng, 75, stands in the elevator of her apartment building at the Cherish Yearn care center facility in Shanghai September 14, 2012. Beijing wants to encourage investment in healthcare services. In January, China reclassified the sector as "permitted" rather than "restricted", meaning overseas companies can own 100 percent of an operation in China. Overseas players including New York-based hedge fund Fortress Investment Group LLC and China Senior Care, backed by one of the principals of U.S. private developer Lerner Enterprises, are also investing in elderly care and retirement facilities, betting that the demographic fallout from China's one-child policy will soften traditional attitudes towards out-of-home care. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Yuefeng stands on balcony of her apartment at Cherish Yearn care center facility in Shanghai

    Yuefeng stands on balcony of her apartment at Cherish Yearn care center facility in Shanghai

    Posted: 10/1/2012 6:02:17 AM EST
    Zhu Yuefeng, 75, stands on the balcony of her apartment at the Cherish Yearn care center facility in Shanghai September 14, 2012. Beijing wants to encourage investment in healthcare services. In January, China reclassified the sector as "permitted" rather than "restricted", meaning overseas companies can own 100 percent of an operation in China. Overseas players including New York-based hedge fund Fortress Investment Group LLC and China Senior Care, backed by one of the principals of U.S. private developer Lerner Enterprises, are also investing in elderly care and retirement facilities, betting that the demographic fallout from China's one-child policy will soften traditional attitudes towards out-of-home care. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Yuefeng sits on her bed in her apartment at Cherish-Yearn care center facility in Shanghai

    Yuefeng sits on her bed in her apartment at Cherish-Yearn care center facility in Shanghai

    Posted: 10/1/2012 6:02:17 AM EST
    Zhu Yuefeng, 75, sits on her bed in her apartment at the Cherish-Yearn care center facility in Shanghai September 14, 2012. Beijing wants to encourage investment in healthcare services. In January, China reclassified the sector as "permitted" rather than "restricted", meaning overseas companies can own 100 percent of an operation in China. Overseas players including New York-based hedge fund Fortress Investment Group LLC and China Senior Care, backed by one of the principals of U.S. private developer Lerner Enterprises, are also investing in elderly care and retirement facilities, betting that the demographic fallout from China's one-child policy will soften traditional attitudes towards out-of-home care. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Group of people play mahjong at cafeteria in Cherish-Yearn care center in Shanghai

    Group of people play mahjong at cafeteria in Cherish-Yearn care center in Shanghai

    Posted: 10/1/2012 6:02:17 AM EST
    A group of people play mahjong, a traditional Chinese game, at the cafeteria in the Cherish-Yearn care center in Shanghai September 14, 2012. Beijing wants to encourage investment in healthcare services. In January, China reclassified the sector as "permitted" rather than "restricted", meaning overseas companies can own 100 percent of an operation in China. Overseas players including New York-based hedge fund Fortress Investment Group LLC and China Senior Care, backed by one of the principals of U.S. private developer Lerner Enterprises, are also investing in elderly care and retirement facilities, betting that the demographic fallout from China's one-child policy will soften traditional attitudes towards out-of-home care. Picture taken September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Man sits in front of a computer at Cherish-Yearn care center in Shanghai

    Man sits in front of a computer at Cherish-Yearn care center in Shanghai

    Posted: 10/1/2012 6:02:17 AM EST
    A man sits in front of a computer at the Cherish-Yearn care center in Shanghai September 14, 2012.Beijing wants to encourage investment in healthcare services. In January, China reclassified the sector as "permitted" rather than "restricted", meaning overseas companies can own 100 percent of an operation in China. Overseas players including New York-based hedge fund Fortress Investment Group LLC and China Senior Care, backed by one of the principals of U.S. private developer Lerner Enterprises, are also investing in elderly care and retirement facilities, betting that the demographic fallout from China's one-child policy will soften traditional attitudes towards out-of-home care. Picture taken September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Building 3 of Cherish-Yearn care center is seen in Shanghai

    Building 3 of Cherish-Yearn care center is seen in Shanghai

    Posted: 10/1/2012 6:02:17 AM EST
    Building 3 of Cherish-Yearn care center is seen in Shanghai September 14, 2012. Beijing wants to encourage investment in healthcare services. In January, China reclassified the sector as "permitted" rather than "restricted", meaning overseas companies can own 100 percent of an operation in China. Overseas players including New York-based hedge fund Fortress Investment Group LLC and China Senior Care, backed by one of the principals of U.S. private developer Lerner Enterprises, are also investing in elderly care and retirement facilities, betting that the demographic fallout from China's one-child policy will soften traditional attitudes towards out-of-home care. Picture taken September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Man walks at the Cherish-Yearn care center facility in Shangha

    Man walks at the Cherish-Yearn care center facility in Shangha

    Posted: 10/1/2012 6:02:17 AM EST
    A man walks at the Cherish-Yearn care center facility in Shanghai September 14, 2012. Beijing wants to encourage investment in healthcare services. In January, China reclassified the sector as "permitted" rather than "restricted", meaning overseas companies can own 100 percent of an operation in China. Overseas players including New York-based hedge fund Fortress Investment Group LLC and China Senior Care, backed by one of the principals of U.S. private developer Lerner Enterprises, are also investing in elderly care and retirement facilities, betting that the demographic fallout from China's one-child policy will soften traditional attitudes towards out-of-home care. Picture taken September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - A woman stands at an escalator at a shopping area in downtown Shanghai

    A woman stands at an escalator at a shopping area in downtown Shanghai

    Posted: 5/2/2011 3:52:12 AM EST
    A woman stands at an escalator at a shopping area in downtown Shanghai May 2, 2011. China's mainland population grew to 1.34 billion by 2010, according to census figures released on Thursday, up 5.9 percent from the 1.27 billion counted in the last census in 2000, and lower than the 1.4 billion population some demographers had projected for the latest tally. The Chinese government's strict controls on family size, including a one-child policy for most urban families, have brought down annual population growth to below one percent and the rate is projected to turn negative in coming decades. China's choke on family size to usually one child in cities and two in the countryside now threatens its economic future, many demographers have said, with fewer people left to pay and care for an increasingly graying population. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY)
  •  - A woman carries a boy inside of a shopping cart at a subway station in Shanghai

    A woman carries a boy inside of a shopping cart at a subway station in Shanghai

    Posted: 4/30/2011 8:40:03 AM EST
    A woman carries a boy inside of a shopping cart at a subway station in Shanghai April 30, 2011. China's mainland population grew to 1.34 billion by 2010, according to census figures released on Thursday, up 5.9 percent from the 1.27 billion counted in the last census in 2000, and lower than the 1.4 billion population some demographers had projected for the latest tally. The Chinese government's strict controls on family size, including a one-child policy for most urban families, have brought down annual population growth to below one percent and the rate is projected to turn negative in coming decades. China's choke on family size to usually one child in cities and two in the countryside now threatens its economic future, many demographers have said, with fewer people left to pay and care for an increasingly graying population. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY IMAGES OF THE DAY)
  •  - A woman carries a boy inside of a shopping cart at a subway station in Shanghai

    A woman carries a boy inside of a shopping cart at a subway station in Shanghai

    Posted: 4/30/2011 7:58:51 AM EST
    A woman carries a boy inside of a shopping cart at a subway station in Shanghai April 30, 2011. China's mainland population grew to 1.34 billion by 2010, according to census figures released on Thursday, up 5.9 percent from the 1.27 billion counted in the last census in 2000, and lower than the 1.4 billion population some demographers had projected for the latest tally. The Chinese government's strict controls on family size, including a one-child policy for most urban families, have brought down annual population growth to below one percent and the rate is projected to turn negative in coming decades. China's choke on family size to usually one child in cities and two in the countryside now threatens its economic future, many demographers have said, with fewer people left to pay and care for an increasingly graying population. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY)
  •  - People throng the Nanjing Road shopping district in Shanghai

    People throng the Nanjing Road shopping district in Shanghai

    Posted: 4/30/2011 3:10:39 AM EST
    People throng the Nanjing Road shopping district in Shanghai April 30, 2011. China's mainland population grew to 1.34 billion by 2010, according to census figures released on Thursday, up 5.9 percent from the 1.27 billion counted in the last census in 2000, and lower than the 1.4 billion population some demographers had projected for the latest tally. The Chinese government's strict controls on family size, including a one-child policy for most urban families, have brought down annual population growth to below one percent and the rate is projected to turn negative in coming decades. China's choke on family size to usually one child in cities and two in the countryside now threatens its economic future, many demographers have said, with fewer people left to pay and care for an increasingly graying population. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY)
  •  - People throng the Nanjing Road shopping district in Shanghai

    People throng the Nanjing Road shopping district in Shanghai

    Posted: 4/30/2011 3:09:07 AM EST
    People throng the Nanjing Road shopping district in Shanghai April 30, 2011. China's mainland population grew to 1.34 billion by 2010, according to census figures released on Thursday, up 5.9 percent from the 1.27 billion counted in the last census in 2000, and lower than the 1.4 billion population some demographers had projected for the latest tally. The Chinese government's strict controls on family size, including a one-child policy for most urban families, have brought down annual population growth to below one percent and the rate is projected to turn negative in coming decades. China's choke on family size to usually one child in cities and two in the countryside now threatens its economic future, many demographers have said, with fewer people left to pay and care for an increasingly graying population. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY)