Offshore Drilling Photos on Townhall

  •  - Adm. Thad Allen (Ret.), national incident commander for the Gulf Oil Spill, testifies at the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling hearing in Washington

    Adm. Thad Allen (Ret.), national incident commander for the Gulf Oil Spill, testifies at the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling hearing in Washington

    Posted: 9/27/2010 10:24:42 AM EST
    Adm. Thad Allen (Ret.), national incident commander for the Gulf Oil Spill, gestures as he testifies at the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling hearing on "the response to the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, environmental impacts, and approaches to restoration" in Washington, September 27, 2010. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT POLITICS)
  •  - Adm. Thad Allen (Ret.), national incident commander for the Gulf Oil Spill, testifies at the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling hearing in Washington

    Adm. Thad Allen (Ret.), national incident commander for the Gulf Oil Spill, testifies at the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling hearing in Washington

    Posted: 9/27/2010 10:18:49 AM EST
    Adm. Thad Allen (Ret.), national incident commander for the Gulf Oil Spill, testifies at the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling hearing on "the response to the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, environmental impacts, and approaches to restoration" in Washington, September 27, 2010. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT POLITICS)
  •  - A view of the site of the BP oil spill, as the drilling of two relief wells continue, in the Gulf of Mexico

    A view of the site of the BP oil spill, as the drilling of two relief wells continue, in the Gulf of Mexico

    Posted: 7/4/2010 10:08:21 PM EST
    A view of the site of the BP oil spill, as the drilling of two relief wells continue, in the Gulf of Mexico, July 4, 2010. A commission appointed by President Barack Obama to study the causes of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill gives academics and environmentalists a prominent role in making recommendations about the future of offshore drilling in the United States. REUTERS/Lyle W. Ratliff (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
  •  - Protestors hold sign against offshore drilling in Miami beach

    Protestors hold sign against offshore drilling in Miami beach

    Posted: 6/26/2010 2:32:37 PM EST
    Protestors from a local cafe hold a sign as they participate with hundreds of beach goers in the 'Hands Across The Sand Miami' event sponsored by several groups protesting offshore oil drilling, which they say presents danger to oceans, marine wildlife fishing industries and coastal economies in Miami Beach, Florida June 26, 2010. REUTERS/Joe Skipper (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Protesters carry large black piece of plastic symbolizing oil spill during protest against offshore drilling in Miami beach

    Protesters carry large black piece of plastic symbolizing oil spill during protest against offshore drilling in Miami beach

    Posted: 6/26/2010 2:30:02 PM EST
    Protestors carry a large black piece of plastic symbolizing an oil spill as they take part in the 'Hands Across The Sand Miami' event sponsored by several groups protesting offshore oil drilling, which they say presents danger to oceans, marine wildlife fishing industries and coastal economies in Miami Beach, Florida June 26, 2010. REUTERS/Joe Skipper (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Floyd Roland, premier of the Northwest Territories, talks to reporters in Alberta

    Floyd Roland, premier of the Northwest Territories, talks to reporters in Alberta

    Posted: 6/9/2010 6:23:25 PM EST
    Floyd Roland, premier of the Northwest Territories, talks to reporters in Calgary, Alberta, June 9, 2010. Two Canadian premiers, Roland and Danny Williams, still back offshore drilling despite the catastrophic oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, arguing that tighter rules can prevent a repeat of the disaster. REUTERS/Todd Korol (CANADA - Tags: HEADSHOT POLITICS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - A sign at the entrance of Pensacola Beach, Florida warns visitors not to pick up tar balls from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    A sign at the entrance of Pensacola Beach, Florida warns visitors not to pick up tar balls from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Posted: 6/5/2010 4:45:45 PM EST
    A sign at the entrance of Pensacola Beach, Florida warns visitors not to pick up tar balls from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill June 5, 2010. The Obama administration has ordered a six-month moratorium on offshore drilling while an investigation determines the cause of the April 20 well blowout that occurred on a rig operated by BP Plc in the deepwater of the Gulf of Mexico offshore Louisiana and revises offshore safety regulations to prevent a future recurrence. The April 20 explosion killed 11 workers and the runaway well has become the largest U.S. spill in history. REUTERS/Colin Hackley (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Mark Hafle with BP testifies at the Deepwater Horizon joint investigation hearing into the incident in Kenner Louisiana

    Mark Hafle with BP testifies at the Deepwater Horizon joint investigation hearing into the incident in Kenner Louisiana

    Posted: 5/28/2010 12:44:04 PM EST
    Mark Hafle with BP testifies at the Deepwater Horizon joint investigation hearing into the incident in Kenner, Louisiana, May 28, 2010. The Coast Guard and Mineral Management Service are co-chairing the joint investigation launched to determine the cause of the initial incident and fire aboard the mobile offshore drilling unit (MODU) Deepwater Horizon. REUTERS/Thomas M. Blue/U.S Coast Guard photo/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT ENERGY BUSINESS) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - The mobile offshore drilling unit Q4000 holds position directly over the damaged Deepwater Horizon blowout preventer as crews work to plug the well head using a technique known as "topkill," in Gulf

    The mobile offshore drilling unit Q4000 holds position directly over the damaged Deepwater Horizon blowout preventer as crews work to plug the well head using a technique known as "topkill," in Gulf

    Posted: 5/28/2010 11:15:47 AM EST
    The mobile offshore drilling unit Q4000 (center L) holds position directly over the damaged Deepwater Horizon blowout preventer as crews work to plug the well head using a technique known as "topkill," in Gulf of Mexico in this May 26, 2010 handout photo. The procedure is intended to stem the flow of oil and gas and ultimately kill the well by injecting heavy drilling fluids through the blow out preventer on the seabed down into the well. Picture taken May 26, 2010. REUTERS/Ann Marie Gorden/U.S Coast Guard photo/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT ENERGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - Jeff Jackson, a SCAT member, discovers a discarded life ring during a search for oil debris on the shoreline of Raccoon Island Louisiana

    Jeff Jackson, a SCAT member, discovers a discarded life ring during a search for oil debris on the shoreline of Raccoon Island Louisiana

    Posted: 5/14/2010 9:49:32 AM EST
    Jeff Jackson, a Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Team (SCAT) member, discovers a discarded life ring during a search for oil debris on the shoreline of Raccoon Island, Louisiana, May 12, 2010. Raccoon Island is a protected bird breeding sanctuary with a variety of breeds. SCAT is working in partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard, BP PLC, local residents, and other federal agencies to aid in preventing the spread of oil following the April 20 explosion on mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon. Picture taken on May 12, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathen E. Davis/U.S. Navy photo/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY DISASTER ENVIRONMENT ENERGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - Members of SCAT survey for oil debris on the shoreline and wildlife on Raccoon Island Louisiana

    Members of SCAT survey for oil debris on the shoreline and wildlife on Raccoon Island Louisiana

    Posted: 5/14/2010 9:49:14 AM EST
    Members of Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Team (SCAT) survey for oil debris on the shoreline and wildlife on Raccoon Island, Louisiana, May 12, 2010. Raccoon Island is a protected bird breeding sanctuary with a variety of breeds. SCAT is working in partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard, BP PLC, local residents, and other federal agencies to aid in preventing the spread of oil following the April 20 explosion on mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon. Picture taken on May 12, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathen E. Davis/U.S. Navy photo/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY DISASTER ENVIRONMENT ENERGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - A worker fabricates a pollution containment chamber at Wild Well Control Inc. in Port Fourchon Louisiana

    A worker fabricates a pollution containment chamber at Wild Well Control Inc. in Port Fourchon Louisiana

    Posted: 5/12/2010 1:44:34 PM EST
    A worker fabricates a pollution containment chamber, known as "top hat" at Wild Well Control Inc. in Port Fourchon, La, May 10, 2010. The chamber is the second built by Wild Well Control and will be used in an attempt to contain a second oil leak that was caused by the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon explosion. Photo taken May 10, 2010. REUTERS/ Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley-US Coast Guard/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - A small pollution containment chamber, known as the top hat, is loaded onto the deck of the motor vessel Gulf Protector in Port Fourchon, Louisiana

    A small pollution containment chamber, known as the top hat, is loaded onto the deck of the motor vessel Gulf Protector in Port Fourchon, Louisiana

    Posted: 5/11/2010 9:15:31 PM EST
    A small pollution containment chamber, known as the top hat, is loaded onto the deck of the motor vessel Gulf Protector at Wild Well Control Inc. in Port Fourchon, Louisiana May 10, 2010. The chamber will be used in an attempt to contain an oil leak that was caused by the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon explosion. Picture taken May 10, 2010. REUTERS/Patrick Kelley/U.S. Coast Guard/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY DISASTER ENERGY BUSINESS MARITIME) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - Oil burn in Gulf of Mexico is monitored by civilian and military personnel in the Gulf of Mexico

    Oil burn in Gulf of Mexico is monitored by civilian and military personnel in the Gulf of Mexico

    Posted: 5/7/2010 11:38:59 AM EST
    Donnie Wilson, (L), Chief Executive Officer of Elastec Inc. American Marine, and U.S. Coast Guard Senior Chief Marine Science Technician Drew Jaeger, attached to Gulf Strike Team from Mobile, Alabama, monitor a controlled fire in the Gulf of Mexico, May 6, 2010. The U.S. Coast Guard working in partnership with BP PLC, local residents, and other federal agencies conducted the "in situ burn" to aid in preventing the spread of oil following the April 20 explosion on Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Deepwater Horizon. Picture taken May 6, 2010. REUTERS/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Justin Stumberg-US Navy/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
  •  - Crewmen aboard the Joe Griffin look on as mobile offshore drilling unit Q4000 lowers pollution containment chamber into the Gulf of Mexico

    Crewmen aboard the Joe Griffin look on as mobile offshore drilling unit Q4000 lowers pollution containment chamber into the Gulf of Mexico

    Posted: 5/7/2010 9:41:47 AM EST
    Crewmen aboard the motor vessel Joe Griffin look on as the mobile offshore drilling unit Q4000 lowers a pollution containment chamber into the Gulf of Mexico over the site of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill May 6, 2010. The chamber is designed to cap the oil discharge that was a result of the Deepwater Horizon rig fire and collapse. Picture taken May 6, 2010. REUTERS/U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS DISASTER ENERGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - Kennedy of Citizens Energy asks BP Plc Executive Vice President for the Americas and Asia Dudley a question in Boston

    Kennedy of Citizens Energy asks BP Plc Executive Vice President for the Americas and Asia Dudley a question in Boston

    Posted: 5/6/2010 3:12:45 PM EST
    Joseph Kennedy of Citizens Energy (R) asks BP Plc (British Petrolem) Executive Vice President for the Americas and Asia Robert Dudley a question while he was speaking at the Boston College Chief Executives' Club in Boston, Massachusetts May 6, 2010. The explosion and sinking of the BP Plc oil rig and subsequent massive oil spill will "forever" change the offshore drilling industry, Dudley, a top executive with the London-based oil giant said on Thursday. REUTERS/Adam Hunger (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
  •  - BP Plc Executive Vice President for the Americas and Asia Dudley speaks in Boston, Massachusetts

    BP Plc Executive Vice President for the Americas and Asia Dudley speaks in Boston, Massachusetts

    Posted: 5/6/2010 2:55:37 PM EST
    BP Plc (British Petroleum) Executive Vice President for the Americas and Asia Robert Dudley speaks at the Boston College Chief Executives' Club in Boston, Massachusetts May 6, 2010. The explosion and sinking of the BP Plc oil rig and subsequent massive oil spill will "forever" change the offshore drilling industry, Dudley, a top executive with the London-based oil giant said on Thursday. REUTERS/Adam Hunger (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT ENERGY BUSINESS)
  •  - The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Southern Responder is pictured during cleanup activity in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana

    The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Southern Responder is pictured during cleanup activity in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana

    Posted: 4/29/2010 11:35:23 AM EST
    REFILE - CORRECTING NAME OF COAST GUARD BOAT The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Southern Responder (R) is pictured during cleanup activity in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread April 28, 2010. The Coast Guard on Wednesday set a "controlled burn" to battle a giant oil slick from last week's deadly offshore drilling rig explosion, as the spill threatened wide-scale coastal damage for four U.S. Gulf Coast states. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Mississippi Responder is pictured during cleanup activity in the Gulf of Mexico

    The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Mississippi Responder is pictured during cleanup activity in the Gulf of Mexico

    Posted: 4/28/2010 11:09:38 PM EST
    The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Mississippi Responder is pictured during cleanup activity in the Gulf of Mexico south of Louisiana where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread April 28, 2010. The Coast Guard on Wednesday set a "controlled burn" to battle a giant oil slick from last week's deadly offshore drilling rig explosion, as the spill threatened wide-scale coastal damage for four U.S. Gulf Coast states. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - An abandoned boat lies submerged in a bayou along Highway 1 in Port  Fourchon, Louisiana

    An abandoned boat lies submerged in a bayou along Highway 1 in Port Fourchon, Louisiana

    Posted: 8/28/2008 2:10:56 PM EST
    An abandoned boat lies submerged in a bayou along Highway 1 in Port Fourchon, Louisiana August 27, 2008. Port Fourchon and coastal cities like New Orleans are staring down the barrel of Tropical Storm Gustav, which could come ashore next week as the worst hurricane since 2005. The 1,600-acre (647-hectare) complex is the support nerve center for over half of all offshore drilling operations, and serves 90 percent of the Gulf's deepwater oil installations. REUTERS/Lee Celano (United States)


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