Nuclear Weapons Photos on Townhall

  •  - U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul

    U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul

    Posted: 3/25/2012 10:06:30 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul March 26, 2012. U.S. Obama said on Monday the United States can further reduce its nuclear weapons stockpile while maintaining its strategic deterrent. Obama, speaking at a university in Seoul ahead of global nuclear security summit, said he plans to raise the issue of arms control with Russian President-elect Vladimir Putin when they meet in May. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY EDUCATION)
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    Posted: 3/25/2012 4:45:47 AM EST
    In this Saturday, March 10, 2012 photo, a waitress and entertainer performs in front of a Dutch flag and a painting of tulips at the North Korean Pyongyang Restaurant in Amsterdam. The establishment is western Europe's first North Korean eatery, set up in cooperation with the North Korean government and staffed by its citizens. While challenging perceptions of North Korea, however, this chain of restaurants raises a tangle of questions about how the world should interact with a country accused of abusing human rights and running a rogue nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 3/25/2012 4:45:46 AM EST
    In this Saturday, March 10, 2012 photo, a cook prepares food in the kitchen of the North Korean Pyongyang Restaurant in Amsterdam. The establishment is western Europe's first North Korean eatery, set up in cooperation with the North Korean government and staffed by its citizens. While challenging perceptions of North Korea, however, this chain of restaurants raises a tangle of questions about how the world should interact with a country accused of abusing human rights and running a rogue nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 3/25/2012 4:45:46 AM EST
    In this Saturday, March 10, 2012 photo, waitresses, right, entertain customers, left, at the North Korean Pyongyang Restaurant in Amsterdam. The establishment is western Europe's first North Korean eatery, set up in cooperation with the North Korean government and staffed by its citizens. While challenging perceptions of North Korea, however, this chain of restaurants raises a tangle of questions about how the world should interact with a country accused of abusing human rights and running a rogue nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 3/25/2012 4:45:46 AM EST
    In this Saturday, March 10, 2012 photo, co-owner Remco van Daal closes a room in the cultural center above the North Korean Pyongyang Restaurant in Amsterdam. The establishment is western Europe's first North Korean eatery, set up in cooperation with the North Korean government and staffed by its citizens. While challenging perceptions of North Korea, however, this chain of restaurants raises a tangle of questions about how the world should interact with a country accused of abusing human rights and running a rogue nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 3/25/2012 4:45:46 AM EST
    In this Saturday, March 10, 2012 photo, a waitress plays the piano between courses at the North Korean Pyongyang Restaurant in Amsterdam. The establishment is western Europe's first North Korean eatery, set up in cooperation with the North Korean government and staffed by its citizens. While challenging perceptions of North Korea, however, this chain of restaurants raises a tangle of questions about how the world should interact with a country accused of abusing human rights and running a rogue nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 3/25/2012 4:45:46 AM EST
    In this Saturday, March 10, 2012 photo, a waitress and entertainer bows to customers in front of a Dutch flag and a painting of tulips at the North Korean Pyongyang Restaurant in Amsterdam. The establishment is western Europe's first North Korean eatery, set up in cooperation with the North Korean government and staffed by its citizens. While challenging perceptions of North Korea, however, this chain of restaurants raises a tangle of questions about how the world should interact with a country accused of abusing human rights and running a rogue nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 3/25/2012 4:45:46 AM EST
    In this Saturday, March 10, 2012 photo, waitresses are reflected in a mirror as they prepare drinks for customers at the North Korean Pyongyang Restaurant in Amsterdam. The establishment is western Europe's first North Korean eatery, set up in cooperation with the North Korean government and staffed by its citizens. While challenging perceptions of North Korea, however, this chain of restaurants raises a tangle of questions about how the world should interact with a country accused of abusing human rights and running a rogue nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 3/25/2012 4:45:46 AM EST
    In this Saturday, March 10, 2012 photo, three customers, center, watch waitresses carry plates to and from the kitchen at the North Korean Pyongyang Restaurant in Amsterdam. The establishment is western Europe's first North Korean eatery, set up in cooperation with the North Korean government and staffed by its citizens. While challenging perceptions of North Korea, however, this chain of restaurants raises a tangle of questions about how the world should interact with a country accused of abusing human rights and running a rogue nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 3/25/2012 4:45:46 AM EST
    In this Saturday, March 10, 2012 photo, a waitress explains what customers are being served at the North Korean Pyongyang Restaurant in Amsterdam. It is western Europe's first North Korean eatery, set up in cooperation with the North Korean government and staffed by its citizens. While challenging perceptions of North Korea, however, this chain of restaurants raises a tangle of questions about how the world should interact with a country accused of abusing human rights and running a rogue nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 3/25/2012 4:45:46 AM EST
    In this Saturday, March 10, 2012 photo, a waitress carries a plate form the kitchen, left, to diners at the North Korean Pyongyang Restaurant in Amsterdam. The establishment is western Europe's first North Korean eatery, set up in cooperation with the North Korean government and staffed by its citizens. While challenging perceptions of North Korea, however, this chain of restaurants raises a tangle of questions about how the world should interact with a country accused of abusing human rights and running a rogue nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 3/24/2012 2:00:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this April 5, 2009 image made from KRT video, a rocket is lifted off from its launch pad in Musudan-ri, North Korea. North Korea may have the bomb, but it hasn't perfected ways to put one onto missiles to strike far-off adversaries like the United States. That's why Pyongyang's announcement that it will blast a satellite into orbit in April, 2012 is drawing so much attention: Washington says North Korea uses these launches as cover for testing missile systems for nuclear weapons that could target Alaska and beyond. (AP Photo/KRT via AP Video, File) NORTH KOREA OUT, TV OUT
  •  - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    Posted: 3/9/2012 12:38:21 PM EST
    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington March 9, 2012. North Korea announced last week that it would suspend key elements of its nuclear weapons program and allow U.N. inspectors to return as part of a deal with the United States that could see the eventual resumption of nuclear disarmament talks that broke down in 2008. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    Posted: 3/9/2012 12:37:43 PM EST
    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington March 9, 2012. North Korea announced last week that it would suspend key elements of its nuclear weapons program and allow U.N. inspectors to return as part of a deal with the United States that could see the eventual resumption of nuclear disarmament talks that broke down in 2008. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    Posted: 3/9/2012 12:36:57 PM EST
    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington March 9, 2012. North Korea announced last week that it would suspend key elements of its nuclear weapons program and allow U.N. inspectors to return as part of a deal with the United States that could see the eventual resumption of nuclear disarmament talks that broke down in 2008. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    Posted: 3/9/2012 12:36:07 PM EST
    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington March 9, 2012. North Korea announced last week that it would suspend key elements of its nuclear weapons program and allow U.N. inspectors to return as part of a deal with the United States that could see the eventual resumption of nuclear disarmament talks that broke down in 2008. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during her meeting with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during her meeting with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    Posted: 3/9/2012 12:35:20 PM EST
    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during her meeting with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington March 9, 2012. North Korea announced last week that it would suspend key elements of its nuclear weapons program and allow U.N. inspectors to return as part of a deal with the United States that could see the eventual resumption of nuclear disarmament talks that broke down in 2008. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    Posted: 3/9/2012 12:34:26 PM EST
    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington March 9, 2012. North Korea announced last week that it would suspend key elements of its nuclear weapons program and allow U.N. inspectors to return as part of a deal with the United States that could see the eventual resumption of nuclear disarmament talks that broke down in 2008.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. Secretary of State Clinton speaks during her meeting with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim at the State Department in Washington

    U.S. Secretary of State Clinton speaks during her meeting with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim at the State Department in Washington

    Posted: 3/9/2012 12:33:20 PM EST
    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during her meeting with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington March 9, 2012. North Korea announced last week that it would suspend key elements of its nuclear weapons program and allow U.N. inspectors to return as part of a deal with the United States that could see the eventual resumption of nuclear disarmament talks that broke down in 2008. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington

    Posted: 3/9/2012 12:14:35 PM EST
    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets with South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan at the State Department in Washington March 9, 2012. North Korea announced last week that it would suspend key elements of its nuclear weapons program and allow U.N. inspectors to return as part of a deal with the United States that could see the eventual resumption of nuclear disarmament talks that broke down in 2008. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)