Nuclear Weapons Photos on Townhall

  •  -
    Posted: 1/29/2012 4:30:51 PM EST
    Herman Nackaerts of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, the chief agency official in charge of the Iran file, prepares for his flight to Iran at Vienna's Schwechat airport, Austria, on Saturday, Jan. 28, 2012. The U.N. nuclear agency is including two senior weapons experts on its mission to Tehran on Saturday, saying that any progress on the issue of alleged clandestine nuclear weapons work by Iran would be significant. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/17/2012 6:30:46 AM EST
    Robert Einhorn, U.S. State Department's special adviser for nonproliferation and arms control speaks during a meeting with South Korean Deputy Foreign Minister Kim Jae-shin, unseen, in Seoul, South Korea Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012. The U.S. delegation is in Seoul for talks on implementing new sanctions against Iran's oil exports, amid mounting concerns over Tehran's suspected nuclear weapons drive. (AP Photo/Jung Yeon-je, Pool)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 3:25:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 29, 1998 file photo, journalists stand around a Ukrainian SS-24 missile silo after it was destroyed in Pervomaisk, Ukraine. The destruction of the silo was part of joint efforts to rid the former Soviet republic of its nuclear weapons arsenal. Ukraine inherited the world's third-largest nuclear arsenal with the 1991 Soviet collapse. The doomsday scenario of Soviet nukes falling into the hands of rogue states or terrorists has, as best as is known, remained fiction, thanks to a massive U.S.-Russian effort to lock them up safely after the Soviet Union fell apart. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 3:25:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 24, 1997 file photo, soldiers prepare to destroy a ballistic SS-19 missile in the yard of the largest former Soviet military rocket base in Vakulenchuk, Ukraine, 220 kilometers (137 miles) west of Kiev. The U.S. helped Ukraine and other ex-Soviet nations secure former Soviet nuclear weapons and dismantle some of them under the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program initiated by Sens. Sam Nunn and Richard Lugar. (AP Photo, File)
  •  - North Korean national flags fly over boats docked on the banks of Yalu River near the North Korean town of Sinuiju

    North Korean national flags fly over boats docked on the banks of Yalu River near the North Korean town of Sinuiju

    Posted: 12/29/2011 2:52:45 AM EST
    North Korean national flags fly at half-mast over boats docked on the banks of Yalu River near the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong, December 29, 2011. North Korea lauded the military might built up by deceased leader Kim Jong-il on Thursday, likely tying his young successor to the same policies that have set Northeast Asia on edge as the impoverished state inches closer to nuclear weapons capability. REUTERS/Jacky Chen (NORTH KOREA - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
  •  - A female North Korean soldier stands guard on the banks of Yalu River near the North Korean town of Sinuiju

    A female North Korean soldier stands guard on the banks of Yalu River near the North Korean town of Sinuiju

    Posted: 12/29/2011 2:52:22 AM EST
    A female North Korean soldier stands guard on the banks of Yalu River near the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong, December 29, 2011. North Korea lauded the military might built up by deceased leader Kim Jong-il on Thursday, likely tying his young successor to the same policies that have set Northeast Asia on edge as the impoverished state inches closer to nuclear weapons capability. REUTERS/Jacky Chen (NORTH KOREA - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
  •  - A North Korean soldier stands guard on the banks of Yalu River near the North Korean town of Sinuiju

    A North Korean soldier stands guard on the banks of Yalu River near the North Korean town of Sinuiju

    Posted: 12/28/2011 6:45:01 AM EST
    A North Korean soldier stands guard on the banks of Yalu River near the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong December 28, 2011. The world watched anxiously on Wednesday as North Korea staged a huge funeral in the capital, Pyongyang, for former leader Kim Jong-il, searching for signs of what to expect from the isolated nation that may be close to attaining nuclear weapons capacity. REUTERS/Jacky Chen (NORTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS OBITUARY MILITARY)
  •  -
    Posted: 11/28/2011 6:20:47 AM EST
    Iranian cleric lawmaker Morteza Agha Tehrani, top right, talks on his cell phone as his colleagues sit, in an open session of the parliament in Tehran, Iran, Sunday, Nov. 27, 2011. Iran's parliament has approved a bill to reduce Tehran's diplomatic relations with London and withdraw the country's ambassador to Britain.The decision is seen as a reaction to support offered by London last week to new American efforts to pressure Tehran to halt its alleged nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)
  •  -
    Posted: 11/9/2011 3:40:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Saturday Sep. 22, 2007 file photo, a member of Iranian Corps Guards of the Islamic Revolution looks at a Shahab 3 missile during military parade in Tehran to mark the 27th anniversary of the Iraqi invasion of Iran that sparked the 1980-88 war. The U.N. nuclear atomic energy agency said Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011 for the first time that Iran is suspected of conducting secret experiments whose sole purpose is the development of nuclear arms. In its latest report on Iran, the International Atomic Energy Agency outlines the sum of its knowledge on the Islamic Republic's alleged secret nuclear weapons work, including developing and mounting a nuclear payload onto its Shahab 3 intermediate range missile - a weapon that can reach Israel, Iran's arch foe. (AP Photo/Hasan Sarbakhshian, File)
  •  - Workers tool a B53 nuclear bomb at a nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Workers tool a B53 nuclear bomb at a nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Posted: 10/25/2011 9:32:00 PM EST
    Workers tool a B53 nuclear bomb at a nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo, Texas, in this handout photograph taken on April 15, 2010 and released on October 25, 2011. The United States dismantled the oldest B53 nuclear bomb in its Cold War arsenal -- and one of the most powerful it ever built -- on October 25, 2011 as part of President Barack Obama's nuclear security policy. Built at the height of the Cold War in 1962, the bomb was designed to be dropped onto a target by a massive B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber. The number of B53s that were once in service, and the number that have been disassembled, remains classified, but Joshua McConaha, Public Affairs Director for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, confirmed that Tuesday's bomb was the final one. Picture taken April 15, 2010. REUTERS/Photo Courtesy B&W Pantex/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR
  •  - An inspector examines the casings of a B53 nuclear bomb at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    An inspector examines the casings of a B53 nuclear bomb at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Posted: 10/25/2011 9:14:21 PM EST
    An inspector examines the casings of a B53 nuclear bomb prior to loading at the B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo, Texas, in this handout photograph taken on September 10, 2007 and released on October 25, 2011. The United States dismantled the oldest B53 nuclear bomb in its Cold War arsenal -- and one of the most powerful it ever built -- on October 25, 2011 as part of President Barack Obama's nuclear security policy. Built at the height of the Cold War in 1962, the bomb was designed to be dropped onto a target by a massive B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber. The number of B53s that were once in service, and the number that have been disassembled, remains classified, but Joshua McConaha, Public Affairs Director for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, confirmed that Tuesday's bomb was the final one. Picture taken September 10, 2007. REUTERS/Photo Courtesy B&W Pantex/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
  •  - The shredded remains of a B53 nuclear bomb are pictured at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    The shredded remains of a B53 nuclear bomb are pictured at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Posted: 10/25/2011 9:10:47 PM EST
    The shredded remains of a B53 nuclear bomb are pictured at the B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo, Texas, in this handout photograph taken on September 11, 2007 and released on October 25, 2011. The United States dismantled the oldest B53 nuclear bomb in its Cold War arsenal -- and one of the most powerful it ever built -- on October 25, 2011 as part of President Barack Obama's nuclear security policy. Built at the height of the Cold War in 1962, the bomb was designed to be dropped onto a target by a massive B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber. The number of B53s that were once in service, and the number that have been disassembled, remains classified, but Joshua McConaha, Public Affairs Director for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, confirmed that Tuesday's bomb was the final one. Picture taken September 11, 2007. REUTERS/Photo Courtesy B&W Pantex/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) FOR EDITORIAL
  •  - Workers examine a B53 nuclear bomb at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo in handout photograph

    Workers examine a B53 nuclear bomb at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo in handout photograph

    Posted: 10/25/2011 7:58:10 PM EST
    Workers examine a B53 nuclear bomb at the B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo, Texas, in this handout photograph taken and released on October 25, 2011. The United States dismantled the oldest nuclear bomb in its Cold War arsenal -- and one of the most powerful it ever built -- on Tuesday as part of President Barack Obama's nuclear security policy. Built at the height of the Cold War in 1962, the bomb was designed to be dropped onto a target by a massive B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber. REUTERS/Photo Courtesy B&W Pantex/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - Handout photo of parts of a B53 nuclear bomb prior to shredding at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Handout photo of parts of a B53 nuclear bomb prior to shredding at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Posted: 10/25/2011 7:54:32 PM EST
    Parts of a B53 nuclear bomb are pictured prior to shredding at the B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo, Texas, in this handout photograph taken on September 11, 2007 and released on October 25, 2011. The United States dismantled the oldest nuclear bomb in its Cold War arsenal -- and one of the most powerful it ever built -- on October 25, 2011 as part of President Barack Obama's nuclear security policy. Built at the height of the Cold War in 1962, the bomb was designed to be dropped onto a target by a massive B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber. Picture taken September 11, 2007. REUTERS/Photo Courtesy B&W Pantex/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  -
    Posted: 10/25/2011 7:00:47 PM EST
    This undated handout photo provided by the National Nuclear Security Administration shows the United States' last B53 nuclear bomb. The 10,000-pound bomb is scheduled to be dismantled Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011 at the Pantex Plant just outside Amarillo, Texas. It?s a milestone in President Barack Obama's efforts to reduce the number of nuclear weapons and their role in the U.S. (AP Photo/National Nuclear Security Administration)
  •  -
    Posted: 10/24/2011 1:40:47 AM EST
    Glyn Davies, right, the U.S. ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency, walks past reporters in Geneva on Sunday, Oct. 23, 2011. Davies is one of two U.S. diplomats leading the American delegation in talks with North Korean officials Monday and Tuesday about Pyongyang's nuclear weapons program. (AP Photo/Frank Jordans)
  •  -
    Posted: 10/20/2011 10:16:16 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 9, 2011 file photo, U.S. Ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, Glyn Davies speaks in Vienna, Austria. Davies, the new U.S. envoy on North Korea is no stranger to nuclear diplomacy and finding ways to deal with prickly adversaries such as Iran. His new assignment, however, could be his toughest yet: persuading a defiant regime that boasts about its nuclear weapons to give up its arsenal in return for aid (AP Photo/Ronald Zak, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 10/14/2011 4:55:52 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 2, 2005, file photo, Stephen Rademaker, then-U.S. assistant secretary of state for arms control, addresses the Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons at United Nations headquarters. Some foreign policy heavyweights who have joined Mitt Romney?s campaign have lobbying and business backgrounds that could shape the advice they give to the Republican candidate. Rademaker, who currently lobbies for the Podesta group, previously worked for the BGR Group, where he represented the embassies of Poland and Kazakhstan and the regional government of Kurdistan. He also lobbied for Raytheon, another major defense contractor involved in ballistic missile defense. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 9/8/2011 6:00:49 AM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 2007 file picture an anti-aircraft gun position is seen at Iran's nuclear enrichment facility in Natanz, Iran. The U.N. nuclear agency said Wednesday Sept. 2, 2011 it is "increasingly concerned" about a stream of intelligence information suggesting that Iran continues to work secretly on developing a nuclear payload for a missile and other components of a nuclear weapons program. In its report, the International Atomic Energy Agency said "many member states" are providing evidence for that assessment, describing the information it is receiving as credible, "extensive and comprehensive." The report was made available Friday to The Associated Press, shortly after being shared internally with the 35 IAEA member nations and the U.N. Security Council. (AP Photo/Hasan Sarbakhshian, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 7/29/2011 6:24:41 PM EST
    North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye Gwan, far left, reacts to media calls for a briefing after a meeting at the Ronald H. Brown U.S. Mission to the United Nations on Friday, July 29, 2011, in New York. The United States is hoping North Korea is willing to abandon its nuclear weapons in exchange for better relations during a second day of talks. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)