Nuclear Weapons Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 2/20/2012 5:40:46 AM EST
    In this photo taken Nov. 18, 2010, President Barack Obama makes a statement about ratification of the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington. The Obama administration's latest consideration of sharp reductions in nuclear weapons has produced a tidal wave of criticism by congressional Republicans, with one lawmaker calling it "reckless lunacy." But the historical record shows that in recent decades, Republicans have been boldest in shrinking the U.S. nuclear arsenal. Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger is at center and then Joint Chiefs Vice Chairman Marine Gen. James Cartwright, right. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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    Posted: 2/20/2012 5:40:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 27, 1991, file photo from television U.S. President George H. Bush addresses the nation from the Oval Office in Washington. In a dramatic move to lower nuclear tensions, Bush announced he is eliminating all land-based nuclear weapons and removing all short-range nuclear arms from submarines and ships worldwide, and called upon the Soviet Union to match the U.S. in unilateral cutbacks and join in negotiations for other arms reductions. (AP Photo/File)
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    Posted: 2/20/2012 5:40:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this April 8, 2010, file photo U.S. President Barack Obama and his Russian counterpart, Dmitry Medvedev, right, sign the 'New START' nuclear arms reduction treaty at Prague Castle, in Prague. The Obama administration's latest consideration of sharp reductions in nuclear weapons has produced a tidal wave of criticism by congressional Republicans, with one lawmaker calling it "reckless lunacy." But the historical record shows that in recent decades, Republicans have been boldest in shrinking the U.S. nuclear arsenal. (AP Photo/CTK, Roman Vondrous)
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    Posted: 2/20/2012 5:40:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 3, 1993, file photo Russian President Boris Yeltsin toasts with U. S. President George Bush, left, after they signed the START II treaty, a landmark nuclear arms control treaty calling for a two-third reduction on the world's most terrifying weapons, in Moscow's Kremlin. The Obama administration's latest consideration of sharp reductions in nuclear weapons has produced a tidal wave of criticism by congressional Republicans, with one lawmaker calling it "reckless lunacy." But the historical record shows that in recent decades, Republicans have been boldest in shrinking the U.S. nuclear arsenal. (AP-Photo/Liu Heung Shing, File)
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    Posted: 2/20/2012 5:40:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 24, 2002, file photo Russian President Vladimir Putin's remarks provoke a laugh from U.S. President Bush, left, as they finish a Kremlin news conference in Moscow after they signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty that Bush said "liquidates the Cold War legacy of nuclear hostility" between Russia and America. The Obama administration's latest consideration of sharp reductions in nuclear weapons has produced a tidal wave of criticism by congressional Republicans with one lawmaker calling it "reckless lunacy." But the historical record shows that in recent decades, Republicans have been boldest in shrinking the U.S. nuclear arsenal. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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    Posted: 2/20/2012 5:40:46 AM EST
    Chart shows changes in numbers of deployed U.S. strategic nuclear weapons since
  •  - A barred window is seen at the Embassy of Iran in London

    A barred window is seen at the Embassy of Iran in London

    Posted: 2/18/2012 9:10:01 AM EST
    A barred window is seen at the Embassy of Iran in London February 18, 2012. Iran is clearly trying to develop a nuclear weapons capability, and if it succeeds it will set off a dangerous round of nuclear proliferation across the Middle East, British Foreign Secretary William Hague said in an interview published on Saturday. The embassy had been ordered closed by Hague in late November 2011. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor (BRITAIN - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Windows are barred and the flagpole bare outside the building of the Embassy of Iran in London

    Windows are barred and the flagpole bare outside the building of the Embassy of Iran in London

    Posted: 2/18/2012 9:09:12 AM EST
    Barred windows and a barren flagpole are seen at the Embassy of Iran in London February 18, 2012. Iran is clearly trying to develop a nuclear weapons capability, and if it succeeds it will set off a dangerous round of nuclear proliferation across the Middle East, British Foreign Secretary William Hague said in an interview published on Saturday. The embassy had been ordered closed by Hague in late November 2011. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor (BRITAIN - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari listens to a question during joint news conference in Islamabad

    Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari listens to a question during joint news conference in Islamabad

    Posted: 2/17/2012 6:16:10 AM EST
    Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari (C) listens to a question along with Afghanistan's President Hamid Karzai (L) and Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad during a joint news conference in Islamabad February 17, 2012. Ahmadinejad, accused by the West of pursuing a nuclear weapons programme, said in Pakistan on Friday foreign nations were determined to dominate the region and this should not be allowed. REUTERS/Mian Khursheed (PAKISTAN - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Afghanistan's President  Karzai,Pakistan's President Zardari and Iran's President Ahmadinejad attend news conference in Islamabad

    Afghanistan's President Karzai,Pakistan's President Zardari and Iran's President Ahmadinejad attend news conference in Islamabad

    Posted: 2/17/2012 5:22:36 AM EST
    Afghanistan's President Hamid Karzai (L), Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari (C) and Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad listen to a question during joint news conference in the President House in Islamabad on February 17, 2012. Ahmadinejad, accused by the West of pursuing a nuclear weapons programme, said in Pakistan on Friday foreign nations were determined to dominate the region and this should not be allowed. REUTERS/Mian Khursheed (PAKISTAN - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Afghanistan's President Karzai, Pakistan's President Zardari and Iran's President Ahmadinejad join hands after a news conference in Islamabad

    Afghanistan's President Karzai, Pakistan's President Zardari and Iran's President Ahmadinejad join hands after a news conference in Islamabad

    Posted: 2/17/2012 4:50:53 AM EST
    Afghanistan's President Hamid Karzai (L), Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari (C) and Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad join hands after a news conference in Islamabad February 17, 2012. Ahmadinejad, accused by the West of pursuing a nuclear weapons programme, said in Pakistan on Friday foreign nations were determined to dominate the region and this should not be allowed. REUTERS/Mian Khursheed (PAKISTAN - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Gioconda Ubeda, Secretary General of the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL), attends the 45th anniversary of the Tlatelolco Treaty at the

    Gioconda Ubeda, Secretary General of the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL), attends the 45th anniversary of the Tlatelolco Treaty at the

    Posted: 2/14/2012 2:56:54 PM EST
    Gioconda Ubeda, Secretary General of the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL), attends the 45th anniversary of the Tlatelolco Treaty at the University Cultural Center in Mexico City February 14, 2012. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY ANNIVERSARY)
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    Posted: 2/3/2012 7:10:46 AM EST
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel walks near German and China national flags as she arrives to deliver a speech at the Chinese Academy of Social Science in Beijing, China, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2012. Merkel called Thursday on China, the biggest buyer of Iranian oil, to use its influence to persuade Tehran to renounce possible nuclear weapons ambitions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 2/3/2012 7:10:45 AM EST
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel listens to a translation at the Chinese Academy of Social Science in Beijing, China, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2012. Merkel called Thursday on China, the biggest buyer of Iranian oil, to use its influence to persuade Tehran to renounce possible nuclear weapons ambitions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 2/3/2012 7:10:45 AM EST
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel delivers a speech at the Chinese Academy of Social Science in Beijing, China, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2012. Merkel called Thursday on China, the biggest buyer of Iranian oil, to use its influence to persuade Tehran to renounce possible nuclear weapons ambitions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 2/3/2012 3:05:46 AM EST
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel delivers a speech at the Chinese Academy of Social Science in Beijing, China, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2012. Merkel called Thursday on China, the biggest buyer of Iranian oil, to use its influence to persuade Tehran to renounce possible nuclear weapons ambitions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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    Posted: 2/2/2012 2:40:49 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009 file photo, Israel's deputy prime minister and minister of strategic affairs Moshe Ya'alon attends the weekly cabinet meeting at the Prime Minister's office in Jerusalem. Iran's suspected nuclear weapons installations are vulnerable to possible military strikes, Yaalon warned Thursday, Feb. 2, 2012, suggesting that underground bunkers don't offer sufficient protection.(AP Photo/Jim Hollander, File)
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    Posted: 1/30/2012 9:00:47 AM EST
    Herman Nackaerts of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, the chief agency official in charge of the Iran file, prepares for his flight to Iran at Vienna's Schwechat airport, Austria, on Saturday, Jan. 28, 2012. The U.N. nuclear agency is including two senior weapons experts on its mission to Tehran on Saturday, saying that any progress on the issue of alleged clandestine nuclear weapons work by Iran would be significant. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
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    Posted: 1/29/2012 4:30:51 PM EST
    Herman Nackaerts of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, the chief agency official in charge of the Iran file, prepares for his flight to Iran at Vienna's Schwechat airport, Austria, on Saturday, Jan. 28, 2012. The U.N. nuclear agency is including two senior weapons experts on its mission to Tehran on Saturday, saying that any progress on the issue of alleged clandestine nuclear weapons work by Iran would be significant. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
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    Posted: 1/29/2012 4:30:51 PM EST
    Herman Nackaerts of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, the chief agency official in charge of the Iran file, prepares for his flight to Iran at Vienna's Schwechat airport, Austria, on Saturday, Jan. 28, 2012. The U.N. nuclear agency is including two senior weapons experts on its mission to Tehran on Saturday, saying that any progress on the issue of alleged clandestine nuclear weapons work by Iran would be significant. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)


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