Northwestern University Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this May 13, 2013 file photo, actor David Schwimmer attends the NBC Network 2013 Upfront at Radio City Music Hall in New York.  Before he became a famous TV star on "Friends,"

    FILE - In this May 13, 2013 file photo, actor David Schwimmer attends the NBC Network 2013 Upfront at Radio City Music Hall in New York. Before he became a famous TV star on "Friends,"

    Posted: 7/9/2013 12:14:14 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 13, 2013 file photo, actor David Schwimmer attends the NBC Network 2013 Upfront at Radio City Music Hall in New York. Before he became a famous TV star on "Friends," actor and director Schwimmer helped start a theater company in Chicago with a group of his Northwestern University classmates. Schwimmer has returned to direct the company's summer offering, a crime comedy called "Big Lake, Big City" written by Keith Huff of TV's "Mad Men" and Broadway's "A Steady Rain." (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
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              In this March 28, 2013 photo, medical resident Stephanie Place examines Maria Cazho at the Erie Family Health Center, in Chicago. As clinics gear up for the expansion of health insuranc

    In this March 28, 2013 photo, medical resident Stephanie Place examines Maria Cazho at the Erie Family Health Center, in Chicago. As clinics gear up for the expansion of health insuranc

    Posted: 6/22/2013 10:03:42 AM EST
    In this March 28, 2013 photo, medical resident Stephanie Place examines Maria Cazho at the Erie Family Health Center, in Chicago. As clinics gear up for the expansion of health insurance, they're recruiting young doctors. Since last summer, Place, 28, a primary care resident at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, has received hundreds of emails and phone calls from headhunters, recruiting agencies and health clinics. The heavy recruitment means she'll have no trouble fulfilling her dream of staying in Chicago and working in an underserved area with a largely Hispanic population. She'll also be able to pay off $160,000 in student loans through a federal program aimed at encouraging doctors to work in areas with physician shortages. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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              In this March 28, 2013 photo, medical resident Stephanie Place examines 2-month-old Abigale Lopez at the Erie Family Health Center, in Chicago. As clinics gear up for the expansion of h

    In this March 28, 2013 photo, medical resident Stephanie Place examines 2-month-old Abigale Lopez at the Erie Family Health Center, in Chicago. As clinics gear up for the expansion of h

    Posted: 6/22/2013 10:03:42 AM EST
    In this March 28, 2013 photo, medical resident Stephanie Place examines 2-month-old Abigale Lopez at the Erie Family Health Center, in Chicago. As clinics gear up for the expansion of health insurance, they're recruiting young doctors. Since last summer, Place, 28, a primary care resident at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, has received hundreds of emails and phone calls from headhunters, recruiting agencies and health clinics. The heavy recruitment means she'll have no trouble fulfilling her dream of staying in Chicago and working in an underserved area with a largely Hispanic population. She'll also be able to pay off $160,000 in student loans through a federal program aimed at encouraging doctors to work in areas with physician shortages. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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              In this March 28, 2013 photo, medical resident Stephanie Place, right, examines 2-month-old twins Abigale, left, and Valeria Lopez as their mother, Carolina Lopez, left, helps, at the E

    In this March 28, 2013 photo, medical resident Stephanie Place, right, examines 2-month-old twins Abigale, left, and Valeria Lopez as their mother, Carolina Lopez, left, helps, at the E

    Posted: 6/22/2013 10:03:42 AM EST
    In this March 28, 2013 photo, medical resident Stephanie Place, right, examines 2-month-old twins Abigale, left, and Valeria Lopez as their mother, Carolina Lopez, left, helps, at the Erie Family Health Center, in Chicago. As clinics gear up for the expansion of health insurance, they're recruiting young doctors. Since last summer, Place, 28, a primary care resident at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, has received hundreds of emails and phone calls from headhunters, recruiting agencies and health clinics. The heavy recruitment means she'll have no trouble fulfilling her dream of staying in Chicago and working in an underserved area with a largely Hispanic population. She'll also be able to pay off $160,000 in student loans through a federal program aimed at encouraging doctors to work in areas with physician shortages. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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              In this April 29, 2013 photo, Northwestern University engineering students Emil Klosowiak, left, and Ali Lamens swing dance during a for-credit class called Whole Body Thinking, at the

    In this April 29, 2013 photo, Northwestern University engineering students Emil Klosowiak, left, and Ali Lamens swing dance during a for-credit class called Whole Body Thinking, at the

    Posted: 5/30/2013 6:17:49 AM EST
    In this April 29, 2013 photo, Northwestern University engineering students Emil Klosowiak, left, and Ali Lamens swing dance during a for-credit class called Whole Body Thinking, at the McCormick School of Engineering in Evanston, Ill. The students say the class is teaching them to think on their feet and work collaboratively with dance partners _ skills they say will help make them better engineers. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)
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              In this April 29, 2013, photo, Jeremy Halpern, center, a civil engineering major, swing dances with Ali Lamens during a Northwestern University class called Whole Body Thinking, in Evan

    In this April 29, 2013, photo, Jeremy Halpern, center, a civil engineering major, swing dances with Ali Lamens during a Northwestern University class called Whole Body Thinking, in Evan

    Posted: 5/30/2013 6:17:49 AM EST
    In this April 29, 2013, photo, Jeremy Halpern, center, a civil engineering major, swing dances with Ali Lamens during a Northwestern University class called Whole Body Thinking, in Evanston, Ill. The students say the class is teaching them to think on their feet and work collaboratively with dance partners _ skills they say will help make them better engineers. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)
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              In this April 29, 2013, photo, Andy Nwaelele, a biomedical engineering major, left, and dance partner Omowunmi Odutola practice wing dance steps during a Northwestern University class f

    In this April 29, 2013, photo, Andy Nwaelele, a biomedical engineering major, left, and dance partner Omowunmi Odutola practice wing dance steps during a Northwestern University class f

    Posted: 5/30/2013 6:17:49 AM EST
    In this April 29, 2013, photo, Andy Nwaelele, a biomedical engineering major, left, and dance partner Omowunmi Odutola practice wing dance steps during a Northwestern University class for engineering students called Whole Body Thinking in Evanston, Ill. The students say the class is teaching them to think on their feet and work collaboratively with dance partners _ skills they say will help make them better engineers. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)
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              In this April 29, 2013, photo, Billy Siegenfeld, Northwestern University Professor of Dance, center right, and dance instructor Jordan Kahl demonstrate swing dance steps for engineering

    In this April 29, 2013, photo, Billy Siegenfeld, Northwestern University Professor of Dance, center right, and dance instructor Jordan Kahl demonstrate swing dance steps for engineering

    Posted: 5/30/2013 6:17:49 AM EST
    In this April 29, 2013, photo, Billy Siegenfeld, Northwestern University Professor of Dance, center right, and dance instructor Jordan Kahl demonstrate swing dance steps for engineering students, in Evanston, Ill. The students are learning to swing dance in a for-credit class called Whole Body Thinking. They say the class is teaching them to think on their feet and work collaboratively with dance partners _ skills they say will help make them better engineers. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)
  •  - U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    Posted: 6/20/2012 2:53:51 PM EST
    U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder delivers a national security speech regarding the Obama administration's ongoing counter terrorism efforts during his visit to the Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago, March 5, 2012. REUTERS/Jeff Haynes
  •  - U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    Posted: 6/20/2012 2:53:51 PM EST
    U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder delivers a national security speech regarding the Obama administration's ongoing counter terrorism efforts during his visit to the Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago, March 5, 2012. REUTERS/Jeff Haynes
  •  - U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    Posted: 6/20/2012 1:04:09 PM EST
    U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder delivers a national security speech regarding the Obama administration's ongoing counter terrorism efforts during his visit to the Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago, March 5, 2012. REUTERS/Jeff Haynes
  •  - U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    Posted: 6/20/2012 1:04:09 PM EST
    U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder delivers a national security speech regarding the Obama administration's ongoing counter terrorism efforts during his visit to the Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago, March 5, 2012. REUTERS/Jeff Haynes
  •  - U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    Posted: 6/20/2012 10:38:21 AM EST
    U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder delivers a national security speech regarding the Obama administration's ongoing counter terrorism efforts during his visit to the Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago, March 5, 2012. REUTERS/Jeff Haynes
  •  - U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    U.S. Attorney General Holder delivers a speech at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago

    Posted: 6/20/2012 10:38:21 AM EST
    U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder delivers a national security speech regarding the Obama administration's ongoing counter terrorism efforts during his visit to the Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago, March 5, 2012. REUTERS/Jeff Haynes
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    Posted: 5/21/2012 3:35:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2007 file photo, Kirk Bloodsworth talks with reporters at a news conference in Annapolis, Md. Bloodsworth spent two years on death row and was later released because of DNA evidence. He is one of more than 2,000 people falsely convicted of a serious crime who have been exonerated in the United States in the past 23 years, according to a new national registry, or database, painstakingly assembled by the University of Michigan Law School and the Center on Wrongful Convictions at Northwestern University School of Law. It is the most complete list of exonerations ever compiled. (AP Photo/Don Wright, File)
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    Posted: 5/21/2012 3:35:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this March 29, 2012 file photo, Michael Morton poses for a photo in Austin, Texas. Morton is one of more than 2,000 people falsely convicted of a serious crime who have been exonerated in the United States in the past 23 years, according to a new national registry, or database, painstakingly assembled by the University of Michigan Law School and the Center on Wrongful Convictions at Northwestern University School of Law. It is the most complete list of exonerations ever compiled. (AP Photo/Will Weissert, File)
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    Posted: 5/21/2012 3:35:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this March 27, 2007, file photo, Audrey Edmunds poses at the John C. Burke Correctional Center in Waupun, Wis., 10 years into serving her 18-year conviction and sentence for shaking a baby to death, while babysitting. Edmunds is one of more than 2,000 people falsely convicted of a serious crime who have been exonerated in the United States in the past 23 years, according to a new national registry painstakingly assembled by the University of Michigan Law School and the Center on Wrongful Convictions at Northwestern University School of Law. It is the most complete list of exonerations ever compiled. (AP Photo/Morry Gash, File)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 10:20:49 AM EST
    In this picture taken during a UN observer-organized tour, Syrian boys pass in front the vehicles of the UN observers during their visit to Hama city, central Syria, on Thursday May 3, 2012. Syrian security forces stormed dorms at a northwestern university to break up anti-government protests there, killing at least four students and wounding several others with tear gas and live ammunition, activists and opposition groups said Thursday. (AP Photo/Muzaffar Salman)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 9:25:48 AM EST
    In this picture taken during a UN observer-organized tour for the media, a UN observer speaks with a Syrian security officer upon their arrival to Hama city, central Syria, on Thursday May 3, 2012. Syrian security forces stormed dorms at a northwestern university to break up anti-government protests there, killing at least four students and wounding several others with tear gas and live ammunition, activists and opposition groups said Thursday. (AP Photo/Muzaffar Salman)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 9:25:48 AM EST
    In this picture taken during a UN observer-organized tour, UN observers don body armor upon their arrival in Hama city, central Syria, on Thursday May 3, 2012. Syrian security forces stormed dorms at a northwestern university to break up anti-government protests there, killing at least four students and wounding several others with tear gas and live ammunition, activists and opposition groups said Thursday. (AP Photo/Muzaffar Salman)


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