native americans Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 4/11/2012 6:05:45 PM EST
    A Kermit the Frog puppet is seen on display as part of a new exhibit, "American Stories," at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2012. The National Museum of American History will open a new exhibit featuring iconic objects from pop culture along with objects dating back to the Pilgrims' arrival in 1620. "American Stories" will be a new chronology of U.S. history from the first encounters of Europeans and Native Americans to the 2008 presidential election. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
  •  - Ukrainian activists dressed as Native Americans protest against a draft law which they say will limit citizen's rights to hold public protests in Kiev

    Ukrainian activists dressed as Native Americans protest against a draft law which they say will limit citizen's rights to hold public protests in Kiev

    Posted: 3/28/2012 9:20:13 AM EST
    Ukrainian activists dressed as Native Americans protest against a draft law which requires citizens to seek the government's approval for protests four days in advance, in Kiev March 28, 2012. The protesters said passing the law would put them in "reservations" and limit the citizens' rights to hold public protests in Kiev. The banners read "We have the right to protest", "Allow peaceful rallies". REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
  •  - Ukrainian activists dressed as Native Americans protest against a draft law which requires citizens to seek the government's approval for protests four days in advance, in Kiev

    Ukrainian activists dressed as Native Americans protest against a draft law which requires citizens to seek the government's approval for protests four days in advance, in Kiev

    Posted: 3/28/2012 9:17:18 AM EST
    Ukrainian activists dressed as Native Americans protest against a draft law which requires citizens to seek the government's approval for protests four days in advance, in Kiev March 28, 2012. The protesters said passing the law would put them in "reservations" and limit the citizens' rights to hold public protests in Kiev. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
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    Posted: 2/9/2012 5:00:49 PM EST
    FILE - This June 7, 2003 file photo shows a man drinking a beer standing with other Native Americans on the streets of Whiteclay, Neb.The Oglala Sioux Tribe announced Thursday, Feb. 6, 2012, that it will file a $500 million federal lawsuit against some of the nation's largest beer distributors, alleging that they knowingly contributed to the chronic alcoholism, health problems and other social ills on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The lawsuit also targets the four beer stores in Whiteclay, a Nebraska town (pop. 11) on the South Dakota border that sells about 5 million cans of beer per year. (AP Photo/William Lauer, File)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 12:25:48 PM EST
    A member of the media looks at busts of men on the eve of the opening of a a new exhibition at the Quai Branly museum in Paris, Monday Nov. 28, 2011. Until less than a century ago, white people regularly put Africans, native Americans or Pacific islanders on display in circuses, expositions and shows. A new Paris exhibit, curated by former football star and anti-racism advocate Lilian Thuram, examines how this demeaning colonial-era tradition shaped attitudes that still linger today.(AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 12:25:48 PM EST
    Former French international football player Lilian Thuram, answers reporter during an interview with the Associated Press, on the eve of the opening of a a new exhibition at the Quai Branly museum in Paris, Monday Nov. 28, 2011. Until less than a century ago, white people regularly put Africans, native Americans or Pacific islanders on display in circuses, expositions and shows. A new Paris exhibit, curated by former football star and anti-racism advocate Lilian Thuram, examines how this demeaning colonial-era tradition shaped attitudes that still linger today.(AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 12:25:47 PM EST
    Former French international football player Lilian Thuram, ponders a question during an interview with the Associated Press, on the eve of the opening of a a new exhibition at the Quai Branly museum in Paris, Monday Nov. 28, 2011. Until less than a century ago, white people regularly put Africans, native Americans or Pacific islanders on display in circuses, expositions and shows. A new Paris exhibit, curated by former football star and anti-racism advocate Lilian Thuram, examines how this demeaning colonial-era tradition shaped attitudes that still linger today.(AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 12:25:47 PM EST
    Former French international football player Lilian Thuram, answers reporter during an interview with the Associated Press, on the eve of the opening of a a new exhibition at the Quai Branly museum in Paris, Monday Nov. 28, 2011. Until less than a century ago, white people regularly put Africans, native Americans or Pacific islanders on display in circuses, expositions and shows. A new Paris exhibit, curated by former football star and anti-racism advocate Lilian Thuram, examines how this demeaning colonial-era tradition shaped attitudes that still linger today.(AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)
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    Posted: 11/28/2011 12:25:47 PM EST
    Nineteenth century models of heads of a Botoduco man are shown at a new exhibition at the Quai Branly museum in Paris, Monday Nov. 28, 2011. Until less than a century ago, white people regularly put Africans, native Americans or Pacific islanders on display in circuses, expositions and shows. A new Paris exhibit, curated by former football star and anti-racism advocate Lilian Thuram, examines how this demeaning colonial-era tradition shaped attitudes that still linger today.(AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)