native americans Photos on Townhall

  •  - 
              FILE - This Sept. 21, 2012 file photo originally released by Clear Channel shows Gwen Stefani of No Doubt performing at the 2012 iHeartRadio Music Festival at the MGM Grand Garden Arena

    FILE - This Sept. 21, 2012 file photo originally released by Clear Channel shows Gwen Stefani of No Doubt performing at the 2012 iHeartRadio Music Festival at the MGM Grand Garden Arena

    Posted: 11/5/2012 1:53:29 PM EST
    FILE - This Sept. 21, 2012 file photo originally released by Clear Channel shows Gwen Stefani of No Doubt performing at the 2012 iHeartRadio Music Festival at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nev. No Doubt has pulled its new cowboys and Indians-themed music video and is apologizing to Native Americans and others who were offended by the clip. The band posted on its website Saturday, Nov. 3, that the video for “Looking Hot” was “never to offend, hurt or trivialize Native American people.” The video features Gwen Stefani and bandmate Tony Kanal dressed in traditional Native American clothes, while Adrian Young and Tom Dumont are in cowboy get-ups with guns. Stefani also rides and horse and sings in a tepee in the clip, which includes a fire-burning dance scene with others dressed in Native American clothes. (AP Photo/Clear Channel, Andrew Swartz)
  •  - 
              Native Americans wait for the start of a canonization ceremony celebrated by Pope Benedict XVI, in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct. 21, 2012. The pontiff will canonize s

    Native Americans wait for the start of a canonization ceremony celebrated by Pope Benedict XVI, in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct. 21, 2012. The pontiff will canonize s

    Posted: 10/21/2012 7:03:27 AM EST
    Native Americans wait for the start of a canonization ceremony celebrated by Pope Benedict XVI, in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct. 21, 2012. The pontiff will canonize seven people, Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native American saint from the U.S., Maria del Carmen, Pedro Calungsod, Jacques Berthieu, Giovanni Battista Piamarta, Mother Marianne Cope, and Anna Shaeffer. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf, left, walks in a field with its mother, right, and another calf at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native

    FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf, left, walks in a field with its mother, right, and another calf at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native

    Posted: 7/28/2012 4:43:37 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf, left, walks in a field with its mother, right, and another calf at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native Americans attended ceremonies at the farm Saturday, July 28, 2012, to name the rare white bison, revered as a symbol of peace and unity. The miracle calf was officially named Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, Flie)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf walks in a field at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native Americans attended ceremonies at the farm Satur

    FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf walks in a field at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native Americans attended ceremonies at the farm Satur

    Posted: 7/28/2012 4:43:37 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf walks in a field at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native Americans attended ceremonies at the farm Saturday, July 28, 2012, to name the rare white bison, revered as a symbol of peace and unity. The miracle calf was officially named Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, Flie)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf, left, walks in a field with its mother, right, and another calf at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native

    FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf, left, walks in a field with its mother, right, and another calf at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native

    Posted: 7/28/2012 4:23:24 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf, left, walks in a field with its mother, right, and another calf at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native Americans attended ceremonies at the farm Saturday, July 28, 2012, to name the rare white bison, revered as a symbol of peace and unity. The miracle calf was officially named Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, Flie)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf walks in a field at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native Americans attended ceremonies at the farm Satur

    FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf walks in a field at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native Americans attended ceremonies at the farm Satur

    Posted: 7/28/2012 4:23:22 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf walks in a field at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native Americans attended ceremonies at the farm Saturday, July 28, 2012, to name the rare white bison, revered as a symbol of peace and unity. The miracle calf was officially named Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, Flie)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/6/2012 3:15:50 PM EST
    This March, 2012 photo provided by SolTribe shows Joe Shark, 29, a resident of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, cuts a tree infested with mountain pine beetles in South Dakota's Custer State Park as part of the Lakota Logging Project. The pine beetle epidemic has grown so large that Native Americans _ historically opposed to the logging industry _ are beginning to become loggers themselves for the greater good of saving the non-infected trees and putting the marred dead ones to use. (AP Photo/SolTribe, Struever McConnell)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/6/2012 3:15:49 PM EST
    In this March 2012 photo provided by SolTribe, Mike Uncapher, right, trains a group of participants in the Lakota Logging Project by teaching safety precautions and techniques involved in cutting down pine beetle-infested trees at Custer State Park in South Dakota. The pine beetle epidemic has grown so large that Native Americans _ historically opposed to the logging industry _ are beginning to become loggers themselves for the greater good of saving the non-infected trees and putting the marred dead ones to use. (AP Photo/SolTribe, Struever McConnell)
  •  - Lower half gray area shows where water line was with Glines Canyon dam near Port Angeles

    Lower half gray area shows where water line was with Glines Canyon dam near Port Angeles

    Posted: 4/28/2012 6:06:13 PM EST
    The lower half gray area shows where the water line was with the Glines Canyon dam as work continues on the removal of two dams, the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams, part of the Elwha River restoration in Olympic National Park near Port Angeles, Washington March 23, 2012. The two dams, about 80 miles (129 km) northwest of Seattle, blocked migratory routes of salmon and steelhead trout to some 70 miles (113 km) of tributary habitat, in the process robbing Native Americans of income by halting a treaty-guaranteed reservation fishery. Picture taken March 23, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin P. Casey (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Excavation work continues at the site of Elwha Dam, part of Elwha River restoration project in Olympic National Park near Port Angeles

    Excavation work continues at the site of Elwha Dam, part of Elwha River restoration project in Olympic National Park near Port Angeles

    Posted: 4/28/2012 6:05:36 PM EST
    Excavation work continues at the site of the Elwha Dam, part of the Elwha River restoration project in Olympic National Park near Port Angeles, Washington March 23, 2012. The two dams, about 80 miles (129 km) northwest of Seattle, blocked migratory routes of salmon and steelhead trout to some 70 miles (113 km) of tributary habitat, in the process robbing Native Americans of income by halting a treaty-guaranteed reservation fishery. Picture taken March 23, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin P. Casey (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Noyes, inspector with URS Corp., looks down from top of dam as work continues on removal of two dams near Port Angeles

    Noyes, inspector with URS Corp., looks down from top of dam as work continues on removal of two dams near Port Angeles

    Posted: 4/28/2012 6:05:04 PM EST
    Doug Noyes, inspector with URS Corp., looks down from the top of the dam as work continues on the removal of two dams, the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams, part of the Elwha River restoration project in Olympic National Park near Port Angeles, Washington March 23, 2012. The two dams, about 80 miles (129 km) northwest of Seattle, blocked migratory routes of salmon and steelhead trout to some 70 miles (113 km) of tributary habitat, in the process robbing Native Americans of income by halting a treaty-guaranteed reservation fishery. Picture taken March 23, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin P. Casey (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Part of the Glines Canyon dam structure left as work continues on the removal of two dams near Port Angeles

    Part of the Glines Canyon dam structure left as work continues on the removal of two dams near Port Angeles

    Posted: 4/28/2012 6:03:23 PM EST
    Part of the Glines Canyon dam structure left as work continues on the removal of two dams, the Elwha and Glines Canyon, part of the Elwha River restoration project in Olympic National Park near Port Angeles, Washington March 23, 2012. The two dams, about 80 miles (129 km) northwest of Seattle, blocked migratory routes of salmon and steelhead trout to some 70 miles (113 km) of tributary habitat, in the process robbing Native Americans of income by halting a treaty-guaranteed reservation fishery. Picture taken March 23, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin P. Casey (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Water flows past some of the concrete and rebar left from part of the Glines Canyon Dams

    Water flows past some of the concrete and rebar left from part of the Glines Canyon Dams

    Posted: 4/28/2012 6:02:41 PM EST
    Water flows past some of the concrete and rebar left from part of the Glines Canyon Dams, part of the Elwha River restoration project in Olympic National Park near Port Angeles, Washington on March 23, 2012. The two dams, about 80 miles (129 km) northwest of Seattle, blocked migratory routes of salmon and steelhead trout to some 70 miles (113 km) of tributary habitat, in the process robbing Native Americans of income by halting a treaty-guaranteed reservation fishery. Picture taken March 23, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin P. Casey (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Maynes sizes up picture on Glines Canyon Dam as work continues on Elwha River restoration in Olympic National Park near Port Angeles

    Maynes sizes up picture on Glines Canyon Dam as work continues on Elwha River restoration in Olympic National Park near Port Angeles

    Posted: 4/28/2012 6:02:15 PM EST
    Barb Maynes, public affairs officer from National Park Service, sizes up a picture on the Glines Canyon Dam as work continues on the Elwha River restoration in Olympic National Park near Port Angeles, Washington March 23, 2012. The two dams, about 80 miles (129 km) northwest of Seattle, blocked migratory routes of salmon and steelhead trout to some 70 miles (113 km) of tributary habitat, in the process robbing Native Americans of income by halting a treaty-guaranteed reservation fishery. Picture taken March 23, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin P. Casey (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Work continues on the removal of two dams, the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams, part of the Elwha River Restoration Olympic National Park near Port Angeles

    Work continues on the removal of two dams, the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams, part of the Elwha River Restoration Olympic National Park near Port Angeles

    Posted: 4/28/2012 6:01:57 PM EST
    Work continues on the removal of two dams, the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams, part of the Elwha River Restoration Olympic National Park near Port Angeles, Washington March 23, 2012. The two dams, about 80 miles (129 km) northwest of Seattle, blocked migratory routes of salmon and steelhead trout to some 70 miles (113 km) of tributary habitat, in the process robbing Native Americans of income by halting a treaty-guaranteed reservation fishery. Picture taken March 23, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin P. Casey (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Work continues on the removal of two dams, the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams, part of the Elwha River Restoration Olympic National Park near Port Angeles

    Work continues on the removal of two dams, the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams, part of the Elwha River Restoration Olympic National Park near Port Angeles

    Posted: 4/28/2012 6:01:21 PM EST
    Work continues on the removal of two dams, the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams, part of the Elwha River Restoration Olympic National Park near Port Angeles, Washington March 23, 2012. The two dams, about 80 miles (129 km) northwest of Seattle, blocked migratory routes of salmon and steelhead trout to some 70 miles (113 km) of tributary habitat, in the process robbing Native Americans of income by halting a treaty-guaranteed reservation fishery. Picture taken March 23, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin P. Casey (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Work continues on the removal of two dams as part of the Elwha River Restoration Olympic National Park near Port Angeles

    Work continues on the removal of two dams as part of the Elwha River Restoration Olympic National Park near Port Angeles

    Posted: 4/28/2012 6:01:05 PM EST
    Work continues on the removal of two dams, the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams, part of the Elwha River Restoration Olympic National Park near Port Angeles, Washington March 23, 2012. The two dams, about 80 miles (129 km) northwest of Seattle, blocked migratory routes of salmon and steelhead trout to some 70 miles (113 km) of tributary habitat, in the process robbing Native Americans of income by halting a treaty-guaranteed reservation fishery. Picture taken March 23, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin P. Casey (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/11/2012 6:05:46 PM EST
    Marc Pachter, interim director of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, speaks during a press preview of the new exhibit, "American Stories," at the museum in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2012. The National Museum of American History will open a new exhibit featuring iconic objects from pop culture along with objects dating back to the Pilgrims' arrival in 1620. "American Stories" will be a new chronology of U.S. history from the first encounters of Europeans and Native Americans to the 2008 presidential election. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/11/2012 6:05:46 PM EST
    Dorothy's Ruby Slippers, from the "Wizard of Oz" are seen on display as part of a new exhibit, "American Stories," at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2012. The National Museum of American History will open a new exhibit featuring iconic objects from pop culture along with objects dating back to the Pilgrims' arrival in 1620. "American Stories" will be a new chronology of U.S. history from the first encounters of Europeans and Native Americans to the 2008 presidential election. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/11/2012 6:05:46 PM EST
    Singer Natalia Flores, 20, of Chicago, stands next to her Quinceanera dress from 2006 that is on display as part of the new exhibit, "American Stories," at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, on Wednesday, April 11, 2012. The National Museum of American History will open a new exhibit featuring iconic objects from pop culture along with objects dating back to the Pilgrims' arrival in 1620. "American Stories" will be a new chronology of U.S. history from the first encounters of Europeans and Native Americans to the 2008 presidential election. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)