Mormons Photos on Townhall

  •  - Michael Carpenter chants along with the other participants after hiking to Ensign Peak during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Michael Carpenter chants along with the other participants after hiking to Ensign Peak during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Posted: 6/30/2012 9:07:39 PM EST
    Michael Carpenter chants along with the other participants after hiking to Ensign Peak during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City June 30, 2012. REUTERS/Jeffrey D. Allred
  •  - Participants look over the Salt Lake Valley after hiking to Ensign Peak during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Participants look over the Salt Lake Valley after hiking to Ensign Peak during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Posted: 6/30/2012 9:07:39 PM EST
    Participants look over the Salt Lake Valley after hiking to Ensign Peak during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City June 30, 2012. REUTERS/Jeffrey D. Allred
  •  - Participants hike Ensign Peak during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Participants hike Ensign Peak during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Posted: 6/30/2012 9:07:39 PM EST
    Participants hike Ensign Peak during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City June 30, 2012. REUTERS/Jeffrey D. Allred
  •  - Organizer Zilpha Larsen, left, hugs participant Alison Lucas during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Organizer Zilpha Larsen, left, hugs participant Alison Lucas during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Posted: 6/30/2012 9:07:39 PM EST
    Organizer Zilpha Larsen, left, hugs participant Alison Lucas during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City June 30, 2012. REUTERS/Jeffrey D. Allred
  •  - Alex Willardson shows his letter during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Alex Willardson shows his letter during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Posted: 6/30/2012 9:07:39 PM EST
    Alex Willardson shows his letter during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City June 30, 2012. REUTERS/Jeffrey D. Allred
  •  - Participants gather during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Participants gather during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City

    Posted: 6/30/2012 9:07:39 PM EST
    Participants gather during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City June 30, 2012. REUTERS/Jeffrey D. Allred
  •  - Chelsea Bair reads a declaration of independence from Mormonism during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake Cit

    Chelsea Bair reads a declaration of independence from Mormonism during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake Cit

    Posted: 6/30/2012 9:07:39 PM EST
    Chelsea Bair reads a declaration of independence from Mormonism during a mass resignation of Mormons from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Salt Lake City June 30, 2012. REUTERS/Jeffrey D. Allred
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    Posted: 5/29/2012 7:50:47 PM EST
    This image provided by Ogden's Own distillery shows a bottle of Five Wives Vodka. The Idaho State Liquor Division says the vodka won't be stocked or special ordered at stores operated by the state of Idaho, claiming the brand is offensive to Mormons who make up over a quarter of the state's population. Five Wives Vodka has been approved for sale in Utah, a state dominated by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. (AP Photo/Brian Skoloff)
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    Posted: 5/29/2012 7:50:47 PM EST
    Bottles of Ogden's Own Distillery Five Wives Vodka are stocked at a state liquor store in Salt Lake City, Tuesday May 29, 2012. The Idaho State Liquor Division says the vodka won't be stocked or special ordered at stores operated by the state of Idaho, claiming the brand is offensive to Mormons who make up over a quarter of the state's population. Five Wives Vodka has been approved for sale in Utah, a state dominated by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. (AP Photo/Brian Skoloff)
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    Posted: 5/3/2012 3:35:51 PM EST
    FILE - This undated file photo shows the Salt Lake Temple in Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Utah. Latter-day Saints are anxious about what?s ahead. Republican Mitt Romney is about to become the first Mormon nominee for U.S. president on a major party ticket, giving Mormons a chance like no other to explain their tradition to the public. But the church?s many critics will have a bigger platform, too. And the vetting will take place amid the emotion of what observers expect will be a nasty general election. (AP Photo, File)
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    Posted: 5/3/2012 3:35:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 1, 1998 file photo, a statue of Mormon pioneer leader Brigham Young stands in front of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' Temple in Salt Lake City. Latter-day Saints are anxious about what?s ahead. Republican Mitt Romney is about to become the first Mormon nominee for U.S. president on a major party ticket, giving Mormons a chance like no other to explain their tradition to the public. But the church?s many critics will have a bigger platform, too. And the vetting will take place amid the emotion of what observers expect will be a nasty general election. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac, File)
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    Posted: 5/3/2012 3:35:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 2, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks in Chantilly, Va. Latter-day Saints are anxious about what?s ahead. Republican Mitt Romney is about to become the first Mormon nominee for U.S. president on a major party ticket, giving Mormons a chance like no other to explain their tradition to the public. But the church?s many critics will have a bigger platform, too. And the vetting will take place amid the emotion of what observers expect will be a nasty general election. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
  •  - Three Year-old Dean Call holds a sign as Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Governor Romney speaks during a campaign rally in Columbia

    Three Year-old Dean Call holds a sign as Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Governor Romney speaks during a campaign rally in Columbia

    Posted: 4/30/2012 6:24:04 PM EST
    Three Year-old Dean Call holds a sign reading "Go Mitt Romney Mormons Rock" as Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign rally in Columbia, South Carolina January 11, 2012. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
  •  - To match Feature MEXICO-MORMONS/

    To match Feature MEXICO-MORMONS/

    Posted: 2/24/2012 1:01:58 PM EST
    John Hatch, an amateur town historian, shows a book with old pictures of the first mormons settlements in Mexico at his home in Colonia Juarez, in the Mexican state of Chihuahua February 7, 2012. In the craggy desert of northern Mexico, relatives of U.S. Republican Presidential front-runner Mitt Romney carved out a lush agricultural valley and prospered after being chased from the United States for their Mormon beliefs and suffering years of hardship. Picture taken February 7, 2012. To match Feature MEXICO-MORMONS/ REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY RELIGION)
  •  - To match Feature MEXICO-MORMONS/

    To match Feature MEXICO-MORMONS/

    Posted: 2/24/2012 1:00:58 PM EST
    John Hatch, an amateur town historian, shows a book with old pictures of the first mormons settlements in Mexico at his home in Colonia Juarez, in the Mexican state of Chihuahua February 7, 2012. In the craggy desert of northern Mexico, relatives of U.S. Republican Presidential front-runner Mitt Romney carved out a lush agricultural valley and prospered after being chased from the United States for their Mormon beliefs and suffering years of hardship. Picture taken February 7, 2012. To match Feature MEXICO-MORMONS/ REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS RELIGION SOCIETY)
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    Posted: 2/23/2012 8:35:48 PM EST
    FILE - This is an undated file photo of Anne Frank, the young Jewish girl who, with her family, hid from the Nazis in Amsterdam, Netherlands, during World War II. The Mormon church is apologizing again just a week after it was learned that the parents of Holocaust survivor and Jewish rights advocate Simon Wiesenthal were posthumously baptized by the organization in a controversial ritual that Mormons believe allows deceased people a way to the afterlife but offends members of many other religions. This time, the apology is aimed at family members of other Holocaust survivors who have also been baptized posthumously, and notable sympathizers, such as Anne Frank. Mormon researcher Helen Radkey, who revealed the Wiesenthal baptisms, said this week she found Frank's name in proxy baptism records dated Feb. 18, showing the ritual was performed in the Santo Domingo Temple in the Dominican Republic. (AP Photo, File)
  •  - To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/

    To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/

    Posted: 1/30/2012 1:16:11 PM EST
    Brothers Van and Dean Call watch Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney speak during a campaign rally in Columbia, South Carolina in this January 11, 2012 file photo. Dean's sign reads "Go Mitt Romney Mormons Rock". These are tumultuous times for the faith founded by Joseph Smith in 1830, and the rumbling began even before church member Mitt Romney's presidential bid put the Latter-Day Saints in the spotlight. Picture taken January 11, 2012. To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/ REUTERS/Brian Snyder /Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS RELIGION)
  •  - To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/

    To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/

    Posted: 1/30/2012 12:55:18 PM EST
    Thousand of faithful Mormons sing a song during the fourth session of the 181st Semiannual General Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City, Utah in this October 2, 2011 file photo. Church members are satisfied with their lives, content with their communities, strongly see themselves as Christian and believe acceptance of them is increasing, a recent Pew Research poll of people who describe themselves as Mormon found. Picture taken October 2, 2011. To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/ REUTERS/George Frey/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION)
  •  - To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/

    To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/

    Posted: 1/30/2012 12:53:43 PM EST
    Actor Andrew Rannells performs a scene from "The Book of Mormon" during the American Theatre Wing's 65th annual Tony Awards ceremony in New York, in this June 12, 2011 file photo. The public profile of America's Mormons had been raised by two pop-culture hits: the recent TV series "Big Love" and the current Broadway hit, "The Book of Mormon." The attention, says church spokesman Michael Purdy, is a "double-edged sword." Picture taken June 12, 2011. To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/ REUTERS/Gary Hershorn/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT RELIGION)
  •  - To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/

    To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/

    Posted: 1/30/2012 12:51:12 PM EST
    The Mormon Tabernacle Choir of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints sings during the fourth session of the 181st Annual General Conference of the church in Salt Lake City, Utah, in this April 3, 2011 file photo. Church members are satisfied with their lives, content with their communities, strongly see themselves as Christian and believe acceptance of Mormons is increasing, a recent Pew Research poll of people who describe themselves as Mormon found. Picture taken April 3, 2011. To match Special Report MORMONCHURCH/ REUTERS/George Frey/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION)


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