Minimum Wage Photos on Townhall

  •  - Doctor Edur Velasco Arregui, a lecturer at the Metropolitan University in Mexico sits inside his tent outside the Stock Market in Mexico City

    Doctor Edur Velasco Arregui, a lecturer at the Metropolitan University in Mexico sits inside his tent outside the Stock Market in Mexico City

    Posted: 10/16/2011 5:56:04 PM EST
    Doctor Edur Velasco Arregui, a lecturer at the Metropolitan University in Mexico sits inside his tent outside the Stock Market in Mexico City October 16, 2011. Dr. Arregui has been on a hunger strike camping outside the Stock Market since the 11th October. He is demanding an increase in the national minimum wage and financial investment in the state universities. Dr Arregui´s demands have been inspired by Occupy Wall Street international movement against financial inequality. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Lucein hangs his towel in his house after returning from his work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Lucein hangs his towel in his house after returning from his work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:55:27 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein (L), 47, hangs his towel in his house after returning from his work at a plastic factory in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
  •  - A Haitian man works at a plastic factory in Manaus

    A Haitian man works at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:55:23 PM EST
    A Haitian man works at a plastic factory in Manaus September 22, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Picture taken on September 22, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - Fils sits near the Pastoral do Migrante shelter where he is based in Manaus

    Fils sits near the Pastoral do Migrante shelter where he is based in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:55:20 PM EST
    Jean Marence Fils, 43, sits near the Pastoral do Migrante shelter where he is based in Manaus September 22, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Fils, who has diabetes and is anemic, has been living in Brazil for eigth months without being able to find work. He wants to go back to Haiti, take care of his health and come back to Brazil. Picture taken on September 22, 2011.
  •  - Haitians are pictured inside their house in Manaus

    Haitians are pictured inside their house in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:55:16 PM EST
    Haitians are pictured inside their house in Manaus September 19, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Picture taken on September 19, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - Lucein opens the door of his house in Manaus

    Lucein opens the door of his house in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:55:07 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, opens the door of his house in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - Jean cooks in his house in Manaus

    Jean cooks in his house in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:55:03 PM EST
    Guy Jean, 25, cooks in his house in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - Lucein talks to his roommates in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Lucein talks to his roommates in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:59 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein (R), 47, talks to his roommates in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27-years-old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
  •  - Jean cooks in his house in Manaus

    Jean cooks in his house in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:55 PM EST
    Guy Jean, 25, cooks in his house in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - A Haitian man is pictured at his house in Manaus

    A Haitian man is pictured at his house in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:51 PM EST
    A Haitian man is pictured at his house in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - Lucein holds his towel inside his room in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Lucein holds his towel inside his room in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:47 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, holds his towel inside his room in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo
  •  - Lucein washes his uniform in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Lucein washes his uniform in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:44 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, washes his uniform in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL
  •  - Lucein washes his uniform in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Lucein washes his uniform in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:40 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, washes his uniform in his house after returning from work at a plastic factory in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL
  •  - Lucein works at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Lucein works at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:36 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, works at a plastic factory in Manaus September 22, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 22, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - Lucein shows his hands while working at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Lucein shows his hands while working at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:33 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, shows his hands while working at a plastic factory in Manaus September 22, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 22, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY
  •  - Lucein poses while working at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Lucein poses while working at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:29 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, poses while working at a plastic factory in Manaus September 22, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 22, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION
  •  - Lucein walks along street next to his house in Manaus

    Lucein walks along street next to his house in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:25 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, walks along a street near his house in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - Lucein leaves a drugstore near his house in Manaus

    Lucein leaves a drugstore near his house in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:22 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, leaves a drugstore near his house in Manaus September 23, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 23, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
  •  - Lucein poses during his work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Lucein poses during his work at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:18 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, poses during his work at a plastic factory in Manaus September 22, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 22, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY
  •  - Lucein poses while working at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Lucein poses while working at a plastic factory in Manaus

    Posted: 9/28/2011 6:54:14 PM EST
    Moteur Lucein, 47, poses while working at a plastic factory in Manaus September 22, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Lucein, who has nine sons between 2 and 27 years old living in Haiti, and has been living in Brazil for seven months, receives a salary of R$640 ($348). Picture taken on September 22, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER HEADSHOT SOCIETY