Medicare Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 10/31/2011 6:10:55 PM EST
    This Aug. 8, 2011 photo, shows the entrance to the Humana building, in Louisville, Ky. Humana Inc.'s third-quarter net income jumped 13 percent on Medicare Advantage enrollment growth, and the health insurer also raised its 2011 earnings forecast Monday, Oct. 31, 2011. (AP Photo/Ed Reinke)
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    Posted: 10/28/2011 3:15:50 PM EST
    Chart shows cost of Medicare Part B premiums since
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    Posted: 10/21/2011 8:20:49 PM EST
    Cancer survivors Richard and Carol Birch stand on their front porch in Geneva, Ill. Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011. The Birches have lived in their home for forty years, have driven the same car for nearly twenty-five years, and never lived above their wage. Medicare is a drain on their finances and they say the new Social Security raise won't help much. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)
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    Posted: 10/21/2011 8:20:49 PM EST
    Cancer survivors Richard and Carol Birch stand on their front porch in Geneva, Ill. Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011. The Birches have lived in their home for forty years, have driven the same car for nearly twenty-five years, and never lived above their wage. Medicare is a drain on their finances and they say the new Social Security raise won't help much. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)
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    Posted: 10/21/2011 2:15:50 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, trays of printed social security checks wait to be mailed from the U.S. Treasury's Financial Management services facility in Philadelphia. About 55 million Social Security recipients will get in 2012 their first increase in benefits since 2009, a 3.6 percent raise. But higher Medicare premiums could erase a big chunk of it. For some, higher Medicare Part B premiums could wipe out as much as a fourth of their raise from Social Security, according to projections by the trustees who oversee the programs. (AP Photo/Bradley C. Bower, File)
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    Posted: 10/18/2011 10:10:53 PM EST
    In this Aug. 25, 2011 photo, registered nurse Mary Schlitter, left, speaks to heart patient Maria Marure, with the help of medical interpreter Marina Moreno at Our Lady of the Resurrection Medical Center in Chicago. A study has shown that hospital stays for heart failure fell a remarkable 30 percent in Medicare patients over a decade. Next year, the nation?s new health law begins punishing hospitals with high readmission rates for heart failure by shrinking Medicare payments. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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    Posted: 9/19/2011 11:45:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2008, file photo, Comptroller General David Walker discusses the long-term budget outlook during the Senate Budget Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Deficit hawks note the inconsistency of 2012 Republican presidential candidates who say they'll try to repeal President Barack Obama's health overhaul, but nod to another massive health care entitlement with unfunded future costs of over $7 trillion created by Republicans. ?I?m an equal opportunity critic here,? said Walker. ?I think the Republicans were irresponsible for passing the Medicare prescription program in 2003 and I think the Democrats were irresponsible for passing?? Obama?s health overhaul. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook, File)
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    Posted: 9/19/2011 11:45:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2003, file photo President George W. Bush greets applauding Congressional leaders as he signs into law the Medicare prescription drug benefit at the Daughters of the American Revolution's Constitution Hall in Washington. Deficit hawks note the inconsistency of 2012 Republican presidential candidates who say they'll try to repeal President Barack Obama's health overhaul, but nod to another massive health care entitlement with unfunded future costs of over $7 trillion created by Republicans. From left to right: Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, Senate Majority Leader Sen. Bill Frist, R-Tenn., Speaker of the House of Representatives Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., President Bush, and Sen. John Breaux, D-La., partially obscured, and House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Texas. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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    Posted: 9/8/2011 1:10:46 AM EST
    Attorney General Eric Holder speaks about Medicare fraud enforcement at the Justice Department in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011. A nationwide law enforcement crackdown has charged 91 people _ including doctors and other medical professionals _ with participating in Medicare fraud schemes involving $295 million in false billing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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    Posted: 9/8/2011 1:10:45 AM EST
    Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, left, speaks about the law enforcement actions of the Medicare fraud strike force as Attorney General Eric Holder listens at the Justice Department in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011. A nationwide law enforcement crackdown has charged 91 people, including doctors and other medical professionals, with participating in Medicare fraud schemes involving $295 million in false billing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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    Posted: 8/20/2011 3:35:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2011 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. Some liberals think he caved. Unions are frustrated with his handling of the economy. Hispanics are bringing the immigration debate directly to his campaign's doorstep. President Barack Obama's summer of discontent has been marked by rumblings within his Democratic base over his willingness to fight congressional Republicans and frustration over the economy. Disappointed by the debt ceiling showdown, liberals want him to hold firm against Republicans this fall, push a bold jobs agenda and draw a line in the sand over taxes and protecting Medicare and Social Security. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
  •  - Attorney General Eric Holder listen to a question at a news conference to announce Medicare Fraud Strike Force law enforcement actions in Washington

    Attorney General Eric Holder listen to a question at a news conference to announce Medicare Fraud Strike Force law enforcement actions in Washington

    Posted: 7/19/2011 6:24:01 PM EST
    Attorney General Eric Holder listen to a question at a news conference to announce Medicare Fraud Strike Force law enforcement actions in Washington, February 17, 2011. REUTERS/Jim Young
  •  - Attorney General Eric Holder listen to a question at a news conference to announce Medicare Fraud Strike Force law enforcement actions in Washington

    Attorney General Eric Holder listen to a question at a news conference to announce Medicare Fraud Strike Force law enforcement actions in Washington

    Posted: 7/19/2011 6:23:49 PM EST
    Attorney General Eric Holder listen to a question at a news conference to announce Medicare Fraud Strike Force law enforcement actions in Washington, February 17, 2011. REUTERS/Jim Young
  •  - Attorney General Eric Holder listen to a question at a news conference to announce Medicare Fraud Strike Force law enforcement actions in Washington

    Attorney General Eric Holder listen to a question at a news conference to announce Medicare Fraud Strike Force law enforcement actions in Washington

    Posted: 7/19/2011 6:08:49 PM EST
    Attorney General Eric Holder listen to a question at a news conference to announce Medicare Fraud Strike Force law enforcement actions in Washington, February 17, 2011. REUTERS/Jim Young
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    Posted: 7/18/2011 11:51:01 AM EST
    FILE - In this July 13, 2011 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn. takes part in a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. So long death panels. Hello "rationing" board. An independent panel authorized by President Barack Obama's health care law to control excessive Medicare cost increases is drawing heavy fire from Republicans. Nearly every health industry lobbying group is pushing for its repeal, as are some consumer advocates. GOP lawmakers call it a rationing panel, and at least one has suggested seniors will die from its decisions. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
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    Posted: 7/10/2011 8:55:52 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 7, 2011, file photo President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio meet with Congressional leadership in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington to discuss the debt. A debt-busting deal on the scale that Obama and Boehner are seeking all but guarantees Medicare beneficiaries would feel part of the pain. Some working-age people and their families could also be on the hook, if the deal ultimately curtails the tax break for employer-provided health insurance. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
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    Posted: 6/28/2011 9:25:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 2, 2011 file phboto, Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Taking aim at huge federal deficits, two Senate rebels outline a plan to raise the age of eligibility for Medicare from 65 to 67 and to charge wealthier seniors more for their care. The proposal by Lieberman, I-Conn., and Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., come as budget negotiators face an early August deadline to reach a deal to raise the debt limit. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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    Posted: 6/28/2011 9:25:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 14, 2011 file photo, Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., talks with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Taking aim at huge federal deficits, two Senate rebels outline a plan to raise the age of eligibility for Medicare from 65 to 67 and to charge wealthier seniors more for their care. The proposal by Sens. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn., and Coburn, come as budget negotiators face an early August deadline to reach a deal to raise the debt limit.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
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    Posted: 6/13/2011 3:57:45 PM EST
    Rita Moore is shown looking out the window of her home Wednesday, June 8, 2011 in Corcoran, Calif. Moore is now diagnosed with advanced cancer and could not afford the prescription drug she needed to help stop the spread of the disease. She is now looking at options for end-of-life care. Researchers say seniors with Medicare prescription drug coverage are facing steep copays for the newest kind of cancer drugs. Unlike older drugs, the medications come as pills and do not have to be administered at a clinic. She needed a drug called Sutent for kidney cancer, but the pharmacy was going to charge her $2,400 for a month?s supply, more than her income. (AP Photo/Gary Kazanjian)
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    Posted: 6/13/2011 3:57:45 PM EST
    Rita Moore is shown looking at a photo of her son Lee and grandchildren Grey and Jordan Goodrich at her home Wednesday, June 8, 2011 in Corcoran, Calif. Moore is now diagnosed with advanced cancer and could not afford the prescription drug she needed to help stop the spread of the disease. She is now looking at options for end-of-life care. Researchers say seniors with Medicare prescription drug coverage are facing steep copays for the newest kind of cancer drugs. Unlike older drugs, the medications come as pills and do not have to be administered at a clinic. She needed a drug called Sutent for kidney cancer, but the pharmacy was going to charge her $2,400 for a month?s supply, more than her income. (AP Photo/Gary Kazanjian)