Medical Marijuana Photos on Townhall

  •  - A variety of cannabis infused food products are displayed in the Simply Pure company kitchen in Denver

    A variety of cannabis infused food products are displayed in the Simply Pure company kitchen in Denver

    Posted: 6/2/2012 9:32:20 AM EST
    A variety of cannabis infused food products are displayed in the Simply Pure company kitchen in Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2012. The Rocky Mountain State already allows the use of marijuana for medical purposes such as severe pain relief, and some communities have embraced it enthusiastically. The prevalence of medical marijuana dispensaries in Denver has moved pot into the mainstream in Colorado's capital city, advocates and political leaders say. In Denver County, home to about 600,000 people, one in every 41 residents is a registered medical marijuana patient, leading to chuckles about the "Mile High City." Picture taken May 25, 2012. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS DRUGS SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - The label on a cannabis infused granola bar is displayed in the Simply Pure company kitchen in Denver

    The label on a cannabis infused granola bar is displayed in the Simply Pure company kitchen in Denver

    Posted: 6/2/2012 9:30:19 AM EST
    The label on a cannabis infused granola bar is displayed in the Simply Pure company kitchen in Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2012. The Rocky Mountain State already allows the use of marijuana for medical purposes such as severe pain relief, and some communities have embraced it enthusiastically. The prevalence of medical marijuana dispensaries in Denver has moved pot into the mainstream in Colorado's capital city, advocates and political leaders say. In Denver County, home to about 600,000 people, one in every 41 residents is a registered medical marijuana patient, leading to chuckles about the "Mile High City." Picture taken May 25, 2012. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS DRUGS SOCIETY FOOD HEALTH)
  •  - James, a former Navy intelligence officer and Obama fundraiser who runs an edible cannabis business, poses in her company kitchen in Denver

    James, a former Navy intelligence officer and Obama fundraiser who runs an edible cannabis business, poses in her company kitchen in Denver

    Posted: 6/2/2012 9:28:16 AM EST
    Wanda James, a former Navy intelligence officer and Obama fundraiser who runs an edible cannabis business, poses in her company kitchen in Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2012. The Rocky Mountain State already allows the use of marijuana for medical purposes such as severe pain relief, and some communities have embraced it enthusiastically. The prevalence of medical marijuana dispensaries in Denver has moved pot into the mainstream in Colorado's capital city, advocates and political leaders say. In Denver County, home to about 600,000 people, one in every 41 residents is a registered medical marijuana patient, leading to chuckles about the "Mile High City." Picture taken May 25, 2012. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS DRUGS SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - The license for the Simply Pure edible cannabis business hangs in the company kitchen in Denver

    The license for the Simply Pure edible cannabis business hangs in the company kitchen in Denver

    Posted: 6/2/2012 9:23:34 AM EST
    The license for the Simply Pure edible cannabis business hangs in the company kitchen in Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2012. The Rocky Mountain State already allows the use of marijuana for medical purposes such as severe pain relief, and some communities have embraced it enthusiastically. The prevalence of medical marijuana dispensaries in Denver has moved pot into the mainstream in Colorado's capital city, advocates and political leaders say. In Denver County, home to about 600,000 people, one in every 41 residents is a registered medical marijuana patient, leading to chuckles about the "Mile High City." Picture taken May 25, 2012. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS DRUGS SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Tvert and Vicente pose in their offices in Denver

    Tvert and Vicente pose in their offices in Denver

    Posted: 6/2/2012 9:19:10 AM EST
    Mason Tvert (L) and Brian Vicente pose in their offices in Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2012. The two are the leaders of a campaign calling for the legalization of an ounce of marijuana, and creating a legal framework so the drug's sale could be regulated and taxed by the state as alcohol is today. The Rocky Mountain State already allows the use of marijuana for medical purposes such as severe pain relief, and some communities have embraced it enthusiastically. The prevalence of medical marijuana dispensaries in Denver has moved pot into the mainstream in Colorado's capital city, advocates and political leaders say. In Denver County, home to about 600,000 people, one in every 41 residents is a registered medical marijuana patient, leading to chuckles about the "Mile High City." Picture taken May 25, 2012. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS DRUGS SOCIETY HEALTH)
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    Posted: 5/17/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    File - In this March 28, 2011, file photo shows a marijuana plant, in Portland, Ore. Medical marijuana advocates have a message for Democratic leaders and federal prosecutors with an eye on political office: Don?t mess with pot. Pushing back against the Obama administration?s crackdown on state medical marijuana programs, one of the nation?s largest pro-pot groups is claiming credit for the defeat of a former federal prosecutor in the Democratic primary for Oregon attorney general. As interim U.S. attorney, Dwight Holton called Oregon?s medical marijuana law a ?train wreck? and oversaw efforts to crack down on pot shops and marijuana gardens that claim to be operating under the state law. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
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    Posted: 5/17/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    File - In this Oct. 20, 2009, file photo, shows a bud of medical marijuana, in Portland, Ore. Medical marijuana advocates have a message for Democratic leaders and federal prosecutors with an eye on political office: Don?t mess with pot. Pushing back against the Obama administration?s crackdown on state medical marijuana programs, one of the nation?s largest pro-pot groups is claiming credit for the defeat of a former federal prosecutor in the Democratic primary for Oregon attorney general. As interim U.S. attorney, Dwight Holton called Oregon?s medical marijuana law a ?train wreck? and oversaw efforts to crack down on pot shops and marijuana gardens that claim to be operating under the state law. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
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    Posted: 5/17/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    File - In this April 27, 2012, file photo shows protesters gathering outside the Portland City Club during the attorney general candidate's debate between Dwight Holton and Ellen Rosenblum, in Portland, Ore. Medical marijuana advocates have a message for Democratic leaders and federal prosecutors with an eye on political office: Don?t mess with pot. Pushing back against the Obama administration?s crackdown on state medical marijuana programs, one of the nation?s largest pro-pot groups is claiming credit for the defeat of a former federal prosecutor in the Democratic primary for Oregon attorney general. As interim U.S. attorney, Dwight Holton called Oregon?s medical marijuana law a ?train wreck? and oversaw efforts to crack down on pot shops and marijuana gardens that claim to be operating under the state law. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
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    Posted: 5/17/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    File - In this May 5, 2011, shows a unidentified man smoking medical marijuana during karaoke night at the Cannabis Café, in Portland, Ore. Medical marijuana advocates have a message for Democratic leaders and federal prosecutors with an eye on political office: Don?t mess with pot. Pushing back against the Obama administration?s crackdown on state medical marijuana programs, one of the nation?s largest pro-pot groups is claiming credit for the defeat of a former federal prosecutor in the Democratic primary for Oregon attorney general. As interim U.S. attorney, Dwight Holton called Oregon?s medical marijuana law a ?train wreck? and oversaw efforts to crack down on pot shops and marijuana gardens that claim to be operating under the state law. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
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    Posted: 5/17/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    File - In this April 27, 2012, file photo shows a protester outside the Portalnd City Club during the attorney general candidate's debate between Dwight Holton and Ellen Rosenblum, in Portland, Ore. Medical marijuana advocates have a message for Democratic leaders and federal prosecutors with an eye on political office: Don?t mess with pot. Pushing back against the Obama administration?s crackdown on state medical marijuana programs, one of the nation?s largest pro-pot groups is claiming credit for the defeat of a former federal prosecutor in the Democratic primary for Oregon attorney general. As interim U.S. attorney, Dwight Holton called Oregon?s medical marijuana law a ?train wreck? and oversaw efforts to crack down on pot shops and marijuana gardens that claim to be operating under the state law. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
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    Posted: 5/17/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    File - In this April 27, 2012, file photo shows protesters gathering outside the Portalnd City Club during the attorney general candidate's debate between Dwight Holton and Ellen Rosenblum, in Portland, Ore. Medical marijuana advocates have a message for Democratic leaders and federal prosecutors with an eye on political office: Don?t mess with pot. Pushing back against the Obama administration?s crackdown on state medical marijuana programs, one of the nation?s largest pro-pot groups is claiming credit for the defeat of a former federal prosecutor in the Democratic primary for Oregon attorney general. As interim U.S. attorney, Dwight Holton called Oregon?s medical marijuana law a ?train wreck? and oversaw efforts to crack down on pot shops and marijuana gardens that claim to be operating under the state law. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 2:35:49 PM EST
    In this April 30, 2012 photo, Michael Shea, left, and Kevin Wallace walk out of their Earth Dragon Edibles Restaurant & Lounge in Ashland, Ore. Medical marijuana patients have to pay for the food, but the hashish-infused oil poured over the stir-fry is free, as is the hashish available for smoking at the bar. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 2:35:49 PM EST
    In this April 30, 2012 photo, Police Chief Terry Holderness poses outside his office in Ashland, Ore. Holderness says a new medical marijuana restaurant in town is not at the top of his priority list, but if authorities determine it violates the law, he will shut it down. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 2:35:49 PM EST
    In this April 30, 2012 photo, medical marijuana patient Christine Totten uses a cereamic heat stick to light a bong loaded with hashish April 30, 2012 in the Earth Dragon Edibles Restaurant & Lounge in Ashland, Ore. Only medical marijuana cardholders are allowed in the restaurant, where the bowls of Mongolian barbecue cost money, but the hashish is free, both in the food and at the hash bar. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 2:35:49 PM EST
    In this April 30, 2012 photo, co-owner Kevin Wallace prepares a bowl of medical marijuana stir-fry at the Earth Dragon Edibles Restaurant & Lounge in Ashland, Ore. Owners had hoped they were within the law by not charging for the marijuana, but have hit a snag on their city business license over federal drug laws. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 2:35:49 PM EST
    In this April 30, 2012 photo, co-owner Michael Shea displays some hashish available for smoking at the Earth Dragon Edibles Restaurant & Lounge in Ashland, Ore. While people have to pay for a bowl of stir-fried vegetables and meat at the restaurant for medical marijuana cardholders only, the hashish is free for registered medical marijuana patients. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 2:35:49 PM EST
    In this April 30, 2012 photo, co-owner Kevin Wallace pours a shot of hashish-infused grapeseed oil over an order of stir-fried vegetables and meat at the Earth Dragon Edibles Restaurant & Lounge in Ashland, Ore. While medical marijuana cafes abound in Portland, Ore., restaurants dedicated to medical marijuana patients have been slow to gain traction. Earth Dragon is trying to overcome objections from City Hall that the restaurant violates federal drug laws, even though the hashish is given away for free. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 6:40:46 AM EST
    In this April 30, 2012 photo, Michael Shea, left, and Kevin Wallace walk out of their Earth Dragon Edibles Restaurant & Lounge in Ashland, Ore. Medical marijuana patients have to pay for the food, but the hashish-infused oil poured over the stir-fry is free, as is the hashish available for smoking at the bar. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/4/2012 6:40:46 AM EST
    In this April 30, 2012 photo, Police Chief Terry Holderness poses outside his office in Ashland, Ore. Holderness says a new medical marijuana restaurant in town is not at the top of his priority list, but if authorities determine it violates the law, he will shut it down. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/4/2012 6:40:46 AM EST
    In this April 30, 2012 photo, medical marijuana patient Christine Totten uses a cereamic heat stick to light a bong loaded with hashish April 30, 2012 in the Earth Dragon Edibles Restaurant & Lounge in Ashland, Ore. Only medical marijuana cardholders are allowed in the restaurant, where the bowls of Mongolian barbecue cost money, but the hashish is free, both in the food and at the hash bar. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)