Mao Zedong Photos on Townhall

  •  - Ma Gang, 81, stands inside his house next to a portrait of former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong in Yuangudui village, Gansu Province

    Ma Gang, 81, stands inside his house next to a portrait of former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong in Yuangudui village, Gansu Province

    Posted: 3/3/2013 3:33:50 AM EST
    Ma Gang, 81, stands inside his house next to a portrait of former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong in Yuangudui village, Gansu Province February 12, 2013. Communist Party chief Xi Jinping, who takes over as China's new president during the annual meeting of the legislature beginning on March 5, visited Yuangudui in February to highlight the poverty that still reigns in huge swaths of the country. Closing a yawning income gap is likely to be one of the policy priorities of his administration and the impoverished villagers are fully conscious of the inequality plaguing China, even if some of them had never heard of Xi Jinping before he showed up in town. Most young people have left for the provincial capital of Lanzhou, where they can make 1,000 yuan ($160) a month, more than the average village income of 800 yuan a year. Picture taken on February 12, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Hotel guides pose for a photograph at Tiananmen Square in Beijing

    Hotel guides pose for a photograph at Tiananmen Square in Beijing

    Posted: 3/3/2013 3:33:50 AM EST
    Hotel guides pose for a photograph in front of the giant portrait of the late chairman Mao Zedong during a pre-session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) at Tiananmen Square in Beijing, March 2, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer
  •  - Ma Gang, 81, stands inside his house next to a portrait of former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong in Yuangudui village, Gansu Province

    Ma Gang, 81, stands inside his house next to a portrait of former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong in Yuangudui village, Gansu Province

    Posted: 3/2/2013 9:11:50 PM EST
    Ma Gang, 81, stands inside his house next to a portrait of former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong in Yuangudui village, Gansu Province February 12, 2013. Communist Party chief Xi Jinping, who takes over as China's new president during the annual meeting of the legislature beginning on March 5, visited Yuangudui in February to highlight the poverty that still reigns in huge swaths of the country. Closing a yawning income gap is likely to be one of the policy priorities of his administration and the impoverished villagers are fully conscious of the inequality plaguing China, even if some of them had never heard of Xi Jinping before he showed up in town. Most young people have left for the provincial capital of Lanzhou, where they can make 1,000 yuan ($160) a month, more than the average village income of 800 yuan a year. Picture taken on February 12, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Ma Gang, 81, stands inside his house next to a portrait of former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong in Yuangudui village, Gansu Province

    Ma Gang, 81, stands inside his house next to a portrait of former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong in Yuangudui village, Gansu Province

    Posted: 3/2/2013 9:11:50 PM EST
    Ma Gang, 81, stands inside his house next to a portrait of former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong in Yuangudui village, Gansu Province February 12, 2013. Communist Party chief Xi Jinping, who takes over as China's new president during the annual meeting of the legislature beginning on March 5, visited Yuangudui in February to highlight the poverty that still reigns in huge swaths of the country. Closing a yawning income gap is likely to be one of the policy priorities of his administration and the impoverished villagers are fully conscious of the inequality plaguing China, even if some of them had never heard of Xi Jinping before he showed up in town. Most young people have left for the provincial capital of Lanzhou, where they can make 1,000 yuan ($160) a month, more than the average village income of 800 yuan a year. Picture taken on February 12, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Hotel guides pose for a photograph at Tiananmen Square in Beijing

    Hotel guides pose for a photograph at Tiananmen Square in Beijing

    Posted: 3/2/2013 6:02:15 PM EST
    Hotel guides pose for a photograph in front of the giant portrait of the late chairman Mao Zedong during a pre-session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) at Tiananmen Square in Beijing, March 2, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer
  •  - Hotel guides pose for a photograph at Tiananmen Square in Beijing

    Hotel guides pose for a photograph at Tiananmen Square in Beijing

    Posted: 3/2/2013 6:02:15 PM EST
    Hotel guides pose for a photograph in front of the giant portrait of the late chairman Mao Zedong during a pre-session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) at Tiananmen Square in Beijing, March 2, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer
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              Chinese security personnel march in thick haze near the portrait of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong in Beijing Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Extremely high pollution levels shrouded eastern

    Chinese security personnel march in thick haze near the portrait of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong in Beijing Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Extremely high pollution levels shrouded eastern

    Posted: 1/29/2013 6:03:25 AM EST
    Chinese security personnel march in thick haze near the portrait of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong in Beijing Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Extremely high pollution levels shrouded eastern China for the second time in about two weeks Tuesday, forcing airlines in Beijing and elsewhere to cancel flights because of poor visibility and prompting government warnings for residents to stay indoors. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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              Visitors stand on Tiananmen Square across from a portrait of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong in thick haze in Beijing Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Extremely high pollution levels shrouded e

    Visitors stand on Tiananmen Square across from a portrait of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong in thick haze in Beijing Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Extremely high pollution levels shrouded e

    Posted: 1/29/2013 6:03:25 AM EST
    Visitors stand on Tiananmen Square across from a portrait of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong in thick haze in Beijing Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Extremely high pollution levels shrouded eastern China for the second time in about two weeks Tuesday, forcing airlines in Beijing and elsewhere to cancel flights because of poor visibility and prompting government warnings for residents to stay indoors. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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              In this Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013 photo, leftists stage a counter-protest with portraits of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong against supporters of the Southern Weekly outside the headquar

    In this Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013 photo, leftists stage a counter-protest with portraits of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong against supporters of the Southern Weekly outside the headquar

    Posted: 1/11/2013 4:03:29 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013 photo, leftists stage a counter-protest with portraits of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong against supporters of the Southern Weekly outside the headquarters of the newspaper in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China. China's new Communist Party leaders want to appear more open, but they’re not about to give up control of the media. That’s the lesson of a dustup involving the influential newspaper whose staff briefly rebelled against especially heavy-handed censorship. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  •  - Leftists protest outside Southern Weekly newspaper in Guangzhou

    Leftists protest outside Southern Weekly newspaper in Guangzhou

    Posted: 1/9/2013 6:43:18 AM EST
    Leftists carrying portraits of the late Chinese leader Mao Zedong demonstrate outside the office of the liberal Southern Weekly newspaper in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou January 9, 2013, denouncing the newspaper as "a traitor newspaper" for defying the party. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
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              Communist loyalists stage a counter-protest with a portrait of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong against supporters of the Southern Weekly newspaper outside the newspaper's headquarters

    Communist loyalists stage a counter-protest with a portrait of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong against supporters of the Southern Weekly newspaper outside the newspaper's headquarters

    Posted: 1/9/2013 2:33:24 AM EST
    Communist loyalists stage a counter-protest with a portrait of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong against supporters of the Southern Weekly newspaper outside the newspaper's headquarters in Guangzhou in south China's Guangdong province Tuesday Jan. 8, 2013. Free-speech protesters in masks squared off against flag-waving communist loyalists in a southern Chinese city Tuesday as a dispute over censorship at a newspaper spilled into the broader population, with authorities shutting microblog accounts of supporters of the paper. (AP Photo) CHINA OUT
  •  - A student wearing a doctorate degree gown poses for pictures in snow near a statue of the late Chairman Mao in Hangzhou

    A student wearing a doctorate degree gown poses for pictures in snow near a statue of the late Chairman Mao in Hangzhou

    Posted: 1/5/2013 4:02:31 AM EST
    A student wearing a doctorate degree gown poses for pictures in snow near a statue of the late Chairman Mao Zedong at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Chance Chan
  •  - A student wearing a doctorate degree gown poses for pictures in snow near a statue of the late Chairman Mao in Hangzhou

    A student wearing a doctorate degree gown poses for pictures in snow near a statue of the late Chairman Mao in Hangzhou

    Posted: 1/5/2013 4:02:31 AM EST
    A student wearing a doctorate degree gown poses for pictures in snow near a statue of the late Chairman Mao Zedong at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Chance Chan
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              In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a flower decoration with Chinese words "Patriotism" is displayed in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, w

    In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a flower decoration with Chinese words "Patriotism" is displayed in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, w

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:24 AM EST
    In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a flower decoration with Chinese words "Patriotism" is displayed in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 16, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk along a popular shopping district in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, a

    In this Nov. 16, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk along a popular shopping district in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, a

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:24 AM EST
    In this Nov. 16, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk along a popular shopping district in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a Chinese boy and a woman pose for photos near Tiananmen Gate in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, weal

    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a Chinese boy and a woman pose for photos near Tiananmen Gate in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, weal

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:24 AM EST
    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a Chinese boy and a woman pose for photos near Tiananmen Gate in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a Chinese woman walks outside a shopping mall with Chinese national flags in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing

    In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a Chinese woman walks outside a shopping mall with Chinese national flags in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:24 AM EST
    In this Nov. 13, 2012 photo, a Chinese woman walks outside a shopping mall with Chinese national flags in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, portraits of Communist Party members who are model workers are displayed outside the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had specia

    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, portraits of Communist Party members who are model workers are displayed outside the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had specia

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, portraits of Communist Party members who are model workers are displayed outside the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
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              In this Nov. 13, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk on a footbridge linking a shopping district near a banner with the words "With excellent results welcome the Chinese Communist Party

    In this Nov. 13, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk on a footbridge linking a shopping district near a banner with the words "With excellent results welcome the Chinese Communist Party

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 13, 2012, photo, Chinese shoppers walk on a footbridge linking a shopping district near a banner with the words "With excellent results welcome the Chinese Communist Party 18th National Delegates Congress successful opening" in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  •  - 
              In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a woman sits on the steps of the Imperial Ancestral Temple behind wooden doors with metal ornaments in Beijing. The color red has long had special significa

    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a woman sits on the steps of the Imperial Ancestral Temple behind wooden doors with metal ornaments in Beijing. The color red has long had special significa

    Posted: 11/16/2012 6:33:23 AM EST
    In this Nov. 12, 2012 photo, a woman sits on the steps of the Imperial Ancestral Temple behind wooden doors with metal ornaments in Beijing. The color red has long had special significance in China, symbolizing health, wealth, and good wishes. Its red army and a sea of red flags and banners came to characterize both cities and countryside following the success of the 1949 revolution. However, in the more than three decades since the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong and the jettisoning of orthodox Marxism, red has taken on different meanings and contexts, some ancient, some very modern, finding its way into home furnishings, luxury items, clothing, and leisure goods, as well as the restored vestiges of Beijing’s imperial heritage. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)


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