Mainstream Media Photos on Townhall

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              In this March 15, 2011 photo taken and provided by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), smoke billows from Unit 3 reactor building after an explosion at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power pl

    In this March 15, 2011 photo taken and provided by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), smoke billows from Unit 3 reactor building after an explosion at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power pl

    Posted: 2/27/2013 1:53:33 AM EST
    In this March 15, 2011 photo taken and provided by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), smoke billows from Unit 3 reactor building after an explosion at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, following the March 11 tsunami and earthquake. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. Nearly two years after the quake and tsunami disaster, the films are an attempt by the creative minds of Japan’s movie industry not only to confront the horrors of the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, but also as a legacy and to empower the victims by telling their story for international audiences. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
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              In this image made from promotional footage for the film "Nuclear Nation" released by the 2012 Documentary Japan, Big River Films, Futaba mayor Katsutaka Idogawa, sixth from left in whi

    In this image made from promotional footage for the film "Nuclear Nation" released by the 2012 Documentary Japan, Big River Films, Futaba mayor Katsutaka Idogawa, sixth from left in whi

    Posted: 2/27/2013 1:53:33 AM EST
    In this image made from promotional footage for the film "Nuclear Nation" released by the 2012 Documentary Japan, Big River Films, Futaba mayor Katsutaka Idogawa, sixth from left in white jacket, poses with evacuees from Futaba town in front of their shelter, the abandoned Kisai high school, in Kazo, Saitama prefecture, near Tokyo, on March 11, 2012, a year after the tsunami and earthquake hit northern Japan. The film "Nuclear Nation," directed by Atsushi Funahashi, documented a story of the residents of Futaba, the town where the tsunami crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. Nearly two years after the quake and tsunami disaster, the films are an attempt by the creative minds of Japan’s movie industry not only to confront the horrors of the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, but also as a legacy and to empower the victims by telling their story for international audiences. (AP Photo/2012 Documentary Japan, Big River Films) CREDIT MANDATORY, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
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              In this image made from a scene from the film “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape" released by Yojyu Matsubayashi, Kyoko Tanaka, a city council member of Minami Soma, patrols in

    In this image made from a scene from the film “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape" released by Yojyu Matsubayashi, Kyoko Tanaka, a city council member of Minami Soma, patrols in

    Posted: 2/27/2013 1:53:33 AM EST
    In this image made from a scene from the film “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape" released by Yojyu Matsubayashi, Kyoko Tanaka, a city council member of Minami Soma, patrols in the deserted town after evacuation of the residents, on April 3, 2011. Japanese film director Matsubayashi took a more standard documentary approach for his “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape,” interviewing people who were displaced in the Fukushima town of Minami Soma. He followed them into temporary shelters in cluttered gymnasiums and accompanied their harried visits to abandoned homes with the gentle patience of a video-journalist. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. (AP Photo/Yojyu Matsubayashi) MANDATORY CREDIT, EDITORIAL USE ONLY
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              In this photo taken Sept. 11, 2012, Atsushi Funahashi, director of the film "Nuclear Nation," speaks during an interview in Tokyo Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012. His film documented a story of

    In this photo taken Sept. 11, 2012, Atsushi Funahashi, director of the film "Nuclear Nation," speaks during an interview in Tokyo Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012. His film documented a story of

    Posted: 2/27/2013 1:53:33 AM EST
    In this photo taken Sept. 11, 2012, Atsushi Funahashi, director of the film "Nuclear Nation," speaks during an interview in Tokyo Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012. His film documented a story of the residents of Futaba, Fukushima prefecture, the town where the tsunami crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. Nearly two years after the quake and tsunami disaster, the films are an attempt by the creative minds of Japan’s movie industry not only to confront the horrors of the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, but also as a legacy and to empower the victims by telling their story for international audiences. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
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              In this Friday, Sept. 7, 2012 photo, Japanese film director Yojyu Matsubayashi speaks during an interview in Tokyo. Matsubayashi took a more standard documentary approach for his “Fukus

    In this Friday, Sept. 7, 2012 photo, Japanese film director Yojyu Matsubayashi speaks during an interview in Tokyo. Matsubayashi took a more standard documentary approach for his “Fukus

    Posted: 2/27/2013 1:53:33 AM EST
    In this Friday, Sept. 7, 2012 photo, Japanese film director Yojyu Matsubayashi speaks during an interview in Tokyo. Matsubayashi took a more standard documentary approach for his “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape,” interviewing people who were displaced in the Fukushima town of Minami Soma. He followed them into temporary shelters in cluttered gymnasiums and accompanied their harried visits to abandoned homes with the gentle patience of a video-journalist. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
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              FILE - This April 17, 2011 file photo shows damage on a street in Futaba, the town where the tsunami crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located, in Fukushima Prefecture,

    FILE - This April 17, 2011 file photo shows damage on a street in Futaba, the town where the tsunami crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located, in Fukushima Prefecture,

    Posted: 2/27/2013 1:53:33 AM EST
    FILE - This April 17, 2011 file photo shows damage on a street in Futaba, the town where the tsunami crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located, in Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. After the March 2011 disaster, of all Fukushima communities forced to evacuate, Futaba chose the farthest spot from the nuclear plant - an abandoned high school in Saitama Prefecture, near Tokyo. Atsushi Funahashi, director of “Nuclear Nation,” documented a story of the residents of Futaba in the film. The catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. Nearly two years after the quake and tsunami disaster, the films are an attempt by the creative minds of Japan’s movie industry not only to confront the horrors of the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, but also as a legacy and to empower the victims by telling their story for international audiences. (AP Photo/Hiro Komae, File)
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              FILE - In this April 7, 2011 file photo, Japanese police wearing protective radiation suits search for the bodies of victims of the tsunami in the Odaka area of Minami Soma, inside the

    FILE - In this April 7, 2011 file photo, Japanese police wearing protective radiation suits search for the bodies of victims of the tsunami in the Odaka area of Minami Soma, inside the

    Posted: 2/27/2013 1:53:33 AM EST
    FILE - In this April 7, 2011 file photo, Japanese police wearing protective radiation suits search for the bodies of victims of the tsunami in the Odaka area of Minami Soma, inside the deserted evacuation zone established for the 20-kilometer radius around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants. Japanese film director Yojyu Matsubayashi took a more standard documentary approach for his “Fukushima: Memories of the Lost Landscape,” interviewing people who were displaced in the Fukushima town of Minami Soma. He followed them into temporary shelters in cluttered gymnasiums and accompanied their harried visits to abandoned homes with the gentle patience of a video-journalist. The March 2011 catastrophe in Japan has set off a flurry of independent films telling the stories of regular people who became overnight victims, stories the creators feel are being ignored by mainstream media and often silenced by the authorities. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder, File)
  •  - A high school student uses his mobile phone to send SMS messages during a candle-light rally against "dangerous" U.S. beef imports in Seoul

    A high school student uses his mobile phone to send SMS messages during a candle-light rally against "dangerous" U.S. beef imports in Seoul

    Posted: 6/13/2008 5:09:54 AM EST
    A high school student uses his mobile phone to send SMS messages during a candle-light rally against "dangerous" U.S. beef imports in Seoul June 12, 2008. Social and political commentators said allegations that an April deal to import more U.S. beef put society at risk of mad cow disease tore through the Internet and on SMS messages so fast that they became fact before the government or mainstream media had a chance to weigh in.Picture taken June 12, 2008. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA)
  •  - Actress Rebecca Romijn poses at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood

    Actress Rebecca Romijn poses at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 6:28:37 AM EST
    Actress Rebecca Romijn poses at the 18th annual Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The GLAAD Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. The show will premiere on Logo, MTV Networks' cable channel on April 21. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Actress Marlee Matlin poses at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood

    Actress Marlee Matlin poses at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 6:26:00 AM EST
    Actress Marlee Matlin poses at the 18th annual Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The GLAAD Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. The show will premiere on Logo, MTV Networks' cable channel on April 21. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Actress Katherine Heigl poses at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood

    Actress Katherine Heigl poses at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 6:09:01 AM EST
    Actress Katherine Heigl poses at the 18th annual Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The GLAAD Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. The show will premiere on Logo, MTV Networks' cable channel on April 21. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Actress Jennifer Aniston poses during the 18th GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood

    Actress Jennifer Aniston poses during the 18th GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 5:34:57 AM EST
    Actress Jennifer Aniston poses during the 18th annual Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The GLAAD Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. The show will premiere on Logo, MTV Networks' cable channel on April 21. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Garry Marshall waves at guests in the balcony at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Garry Marshall waves at guests in the balcony at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 2:54:14 AM EST
    Garry Marshall waves at guests in the balcony at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Jennifer Aniston looks down as she accepts the Vanguard award at the 18th annual GLAAD Media awards in Hollywood

    Jennifer Aniston looks down as she accepts the Vanguard award at the 18th annual GLAAD Media awards in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 2:28:31 AM EST
    Actress Jennifer Aniston looks down as she accepts the Vanguard award at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Sarah Paulson and Rachel Griffiths speak on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Sarah Paulson and Rachel Griffiths speak on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 2:25:11 AM EST
    Actresses Sarah Paulson (L) and Rachel Griffiths speak on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - T.R. Knight attends the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    T.R. Knight attends the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 2:24:20 AM EST
    Actor T.R. Knight attends the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Jennifer Aniston accepts the Vanguard Award at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Jennifer Aniston accepts the Vanguard Award at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 2:19:52 AM EST
    Actress Jennifer Aniston accepts the Vanguard Award at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - John Amaechi speaks on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    John Amaechi speaks on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 2:18:32 AM EST
    Former NBA player John Amaechi speaks on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Eva Mendes gestures at Rebecca Romijn on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Eva Mendes gestures at Rebecca Romijn on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 2:14:02 AM EST
    Actress Eva Mendes (R) gestures at Rebecca Romijn on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. The show will premiere on Logo, MTV Networks' cable channel on April 21. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Lance Bass speaks on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Lance Bass speaks on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Hollywood

    Posted: 4/15/2007 2:05:39 AM EST
    Lance Bass speaks on stage at the 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California April 14, 2007. The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media awards recognize and honor mainstream media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender community and the issues that affect their lives. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES)