Lawsuits Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 3/5/2012 12:35:45 AM EST
    FILE - In a Saturday, June 12, 2010 file photo, crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill washes ashore in Orange Beach, Ala. BP agreed late Friday March 2, 2012 to settle lawsuits brought by more than 100,000 fishermen who lost work, cleanup workers who got sick and others who claimed harm from the oil giant's 2010 Gulf of Mexico disaster, the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history. The momentous settlement will have no cap to compensate the plaintiffs, though BP PLC estimated it would have to pay out about $7.8 billion, making it one of the largest class-action settlements ever. After the Exxon Valdez disaster in 1989, the company ultimately settled with the U.S. government for $1 billion, which would be about $1.8 billion today. (AP Photo/Dave Martin, File)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 12:35:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this April 21, 2010 file photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, fire boat response crews spray water on the blazing remnants of BP's Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig. BP agreed late Friday March 2, 2012 to settle lawsuits brought by more than 100,000 fishermen who lost work, cleanup workers who got sick and others who claimed harm from the oil giant's 2010 Gulf of Mexico disaster, the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history. The momentous settlement will have no cap to compensate the plaintiffs, though BP PLC estimated it would have to pay out about $7.8 billion, making it one of the largest class-action settlements ever. After the Exxon Valdez disaster in 1989, the company ultimately settled with the U.S. government for $1 billion, which would be about $1.8 billion today. (AP Photo/US Coast Guard, File)
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    Posted: 3/4/2012 9:25:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 24, 2010 file photo, BP PLC CEO Tony Hayward speaks during a news conference on Fourchon Beach in Port Fourchon, La. BP agreed late Friday March 2, 2012 to settle lawsuits brought by more than 100,000 fishermen who lost work, cleanup workers who got sick and others who claimed harm from the oil giant's 2010 Gulf of Mexico disaster, the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history. The spill exposed oil industry failings, and forced BP chief executive Tony Hayward to step down after the company's repeated gaffes, including his infamous statement at the height of the crisis: "I'd like my life back." He was jettisoned off to work for a BP affiliate in Russia and has since left that company. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
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    Posted: 2/27/2012 10:15:46 AM EST
    In this photo taken Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012, Charles Wiwa, 44, poses for a portrait in Chicago. Wiwa, fled Nigeria in 1996 following a crackdown on protests against Shell?s oil operations in the Niger Delta. He and other natives of the oil-rich Ogoni region claim Shell was eager to stop protests in the area and was complicit in Nigerian government actions that included fatal shootings, rapes, beatings, arrests and property destruction. U.S. Supreme Court justices will hear arguments Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012, over the reach of the Alien Tort Statute and a 20-year-old law that allows victims of torture to pursue civil lawsuits against the responsible individuals. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
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    Posted: 2/27/2012 10:15:46 AM EST
    In this photo taken Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012, Nigerian-born Charles Wiwa, 44, poses for a portrait in Chicago. Wiwa fled Nigeria in 1996 following a crackdown on protests against ShellÌs oil operations in the Niger Delta. He and other natives of the oil-rich Ogoni region claim Shell was eager to stop protests in the area and was complicit in Nigerian government actions that included fatal shootings, rapes, beatings, arrests and property destruction. U.S. Supreme Court justices will hear arguments Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012, over the reach of the Alien Tort Statute and a 20-year-old law that allows victims of torture to pursue civil lawsuits against the responsible individuals. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
  •  - U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome

    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome

    Posted: 2/9/2012 1:44:28 PM EST
    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome February 9, 2012. Eaves, who is representing some victims and survivors of the Costa Concordia cruise that ran aground off the west coast of Italy at Giglio island, is urging passengers to file individual lawsuits in the United States. REUTERS/Max Rossi
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    Posted: 2/9/2012 11:40:46 AM EST
    Michelle Stanistreet, General Secretary of the National Union of Journalists, (NUJ) , arrives to testify at the final day of the first phase of the Leveson Inquiry, in central London, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. Rupert Murdoch's News International has settled nearly all the cases against the company in the first wave of lawsuits for phone hacking by its journalists, with a new round of apologies and payouts announced Wednesday in a London court. But a potentially damaging claim lodged by British singer Charlotte Church is still headed to trial later this month and a wave of new lawsuits _ as many as 56 in all _ is looming, lawyers told London's High Court. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
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    Posted: 2/9/2012 11:40:46 AM EST
    Michelle Stanistreet, General Secretary of the National Union of Journalists, (NUJ), center, arrives to testify at the final day of the first phase of the Leveson Inquiry, in central London, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012.Rupert Murdoch's News International has settled nearly all the cases against the company in the first wave of lawsuits for phone hacking by its journalists, with a new round of apologies and payouts announced Wednesday in a London court. But a potentially damaging claim lodged by British singer Charlotte Church is still headed to trial later this month and a wave of new lawsuits _ as many as 56 in all _ is looming, lawyers told London's High Court. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
  •  - U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome

    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome

    Posted: 2/9/2012 6:44:08 AM EST
    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome February 9, 2012. Eaves, who is representing some victims and survivors of the Costa Concordia cruise that ran aground off the west coast of Italy at Giglio island, is urging passengers to file individual lawsuits in the United States. REUTERS/Max Rossi (ITALY - Tags: MARITIME CRIME LAW DISASTER)
  •  - U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. talks to the media at the Foreign Press Association in Rome

    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. talks to the media at the Foreign Press Association in Rome

    Posted: 2/9/2012 6:43:13 AM EST
    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. (L) talks to the media at the Foreign Press Association in Rome February 9, 2012. Eaves, who is representing some victims and survivors of the Costa Concordia cruise that ran aground off the west coast of Italy at Giglio island, is urging passengers to file individual lawsuits in the United States. REUTERS/Max Rossi (ITALY - Tags: MARITIME CRIME LAW DISASTER)
  •  - U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. talks to the media at the Foreign Press Association in Rome

    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. talks to the media at the Foreign Press Association in Rome

    Posted: 2/9/2012 6:42:18 AM EST
    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. talks to the media at the Foreign Press Association in Rome February 9, 2012. Eaves, who is representing some victims and survivors of the Costa Concordia cruise that ran aground off the west coast of Italy at Giglio island, is urging passengers to file individual lawsuits in the United States. REUTERS/Max Rossi (ITALY - Tags: MARITIME CRIME LAW DISASTER)
  •  - U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Foreign Press Association in Rome

    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Foreign Press Association in Rome

    Posted: 2/9/2012 6:39:09 AM EST
    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Foreign Press Association in Rome February 9, 2012. Eaves, who is representing some victims and survivors of the Costa Concordia cruise that ran aground off the west coast of Italy at Giglio island, is urging passengers to file individual lawsuits in the United States. REUTERS/Max Rossi (ITALY - Tags: MARITIME CRIME LAW DISASTER)
  •  - U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome

    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome

    Posted: 2/9/2012 6:37:02 AM EST
    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome February 9, 2012. Eaves, who is representing some victims and survivors of the Costa Concordia cruise that ran aground off the west coast of Italy at Giglio island, is urging passengers to file individual lawsuits in the United States. REUTERS/Max Rossi (ITALY - Tags: MARITIME CRIME LAW DISASTER)
  •  - U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome

    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome

    Posted: 2/9/2012 6:33:18 AM EST
    U.S. personal injury lawyer John Arthur Eaves Jr. poses in front of the Trevi fountain in Rome February 9, 2012. Eaves, who is representing some victims and survivors of the Costa Concordia cruise that ran aground off the west coast of Italy at Giglio island, is urging passengers to file individual lawsuits in the United States. REUTERS/Max Rossi (ITALY - Tags: MARITIME CRIME LAW DISASTER)
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    Posted: 2/8/2012 1:45:46 PM EST
    This photo of May 22, 2011 shows comedian Steve Coogan who received a settlement of 40,000 pounds ($63,500) from Rupert Murdoch's UK newspaper company over phone hacking. Nine more phone hacking lawsuits against Rupert Murdoch's News International have been settled, including a case brought by comedian Steve Coogan, the victims' lawyer told Britain's High Court on Wednesday Feb. 8, 2012. That brings to more than 60 the number of claims that Murdoch's UK newspaper company has dealt with in the scandal that has already brought down a 168-year-old tabloid and threatened Murdoch's global media empire. (AP Photo/Ian West/PA Wire, File) UNITED KINGDOM OUT NO SALES NO ARCHIVE
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    Posted: 2/7/2012 3:30:53 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan 12, 2012 file photo, former ESPN commentator Craig James is seen announcing his candidacy for U.S. Senate seat in Austin, Texas. James wants to talk about foreign and domestic policy, yet he can?t avoid questions or comments about a pair of high-profile college scandals, one when he was 25 years old and another from 2009 that has him tangled in lawsuits that threaten to swamp his campaign for the U.S. Senate in the Republican primary. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
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    Posted: 1/28/2012 1:30:45 PM EST
    Zied Krichen, 2nd right, editor of the newspaper "The Maghreb", and Hamadi Redissi, president of the Tunisian Observatory for a Democratic Transition, right , are chased by Tunisian Salafi Muslims as they leave the Tunis courthouse after attending the trial of Nabil Karoui, the owner of a Tunisian private channel, Nessma TV, Monday, Jan. 23, 2012.Nearly 140 lawyers filed lawsuits against Karoui for 'violating sacred values' and 'disturbing public order' after his station broadcast a version of the French-Iranian film Persepolis dubbed in Tunisian dialect. The film, which won the jury prize at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival, contains a scene showing a character representing God. Depictions of God are considered sacrilege in Islam. The trial was postponed until April 2012. (AP Photo/Amine Landoulsi)
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    Posted: 1/23/2012 1:35:46 PM EST
    The owner of the Tunisian private channel Nessma TV, Nabil Karoui, center, leaves the Tunis courthouse after attending his trial in Tunis, Monday, Jan. 23, 2012. Nearly 140 lawyers filed lawsuits against Karoui for 'violating sacred values' and 'disturbing public order' after his station broadcast a version of the French-Iranian film Persepolis dubbed in Tunisian dialect. The film, which won the jury prize at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival, contains a scene showing a character representing God. Depictions of God are considered sacrilege in Islam. The trial was postponed until April 2012. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)
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    Posted: 1/23/2012 1:35:46 PM EST
    The owner of the Tunisian private channel Nessma TV, Nabil Karoui, gets into his car as he leaves the Tunis courthouse after attending his trial in Tunis, Monday, Jan. 23, 2012. Nearly 140 lawyers filed lawsuits against Karoui for 'violating sacred values' and 'disturbing public order' after his station broadcast a version of the French-Iranian film Persepolis dubbed in Tunisian dialect. The film, which won the jury prize at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival, contains a scene showing a character representing God. Depictions of God are considered sacrilege in Islam. The trial was postponed until April 2012. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)
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    Posted: 1/23/2012 1:35:46 PM EST
    The owner of the Tunisian private channel Nessma TV, Nabil Karoui, center, leaves the Tunis courthouse after attending his trial, Monday, Jan. 23, 2012. Nearly 140 lawyers filed lawsuits against Karoui for 'violating sacred values' and 'disturbing public order' after his station broadcast a version of the French-Iranian film Persepolis dubbed in Tunisian dialect. The film, which won the jury prize at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival, contains a scene showing a character representing God. Depictions of God are considered sacrilege in Islam. The trial was posponed until April 2012. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)


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