Lawsuits Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 5/14/2012 11:25:46 PM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown discusses his revised state budget plan during a Capitol news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, May 14, 2012. Brown said the budget shortfall swelled from $9.2 billion predicted in January to $16 billion, in part because tax collections have not come in as high as expected and lawsuits and federal requirements that have blocked billions of dollars in state cuts. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
  •  - Pedestrians walk past a Bank of America ATM in Charlotte

    Pedestrians walk past a Bank of America ATM in Charlotte

    Posted: 4/18/2012 8:08:35 PM EST
    Pedestrians walk past a Bank of America ATM in Charlotte, North Carolina April 18, 2012. When Bank of America reports first-quarter earnings on Thursday, analysts will be looking for signs the bank can boost earnings at a time of low interest rates and new regulations. The second-biggest U.S. bank by assets has lagged its peers in recovering from the financial crisis largely because of losses and lawsuits tied to its 2008 Countrywide Financial purchase. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
  •  - A Bank of America customer uses an ATM in Charlotte

    A Bank of America customer uses an ATM in Charlotte

    Posted: 4/18/2012 8:07:27 PM EST
    A Bank of America customer uses an ATM in Charlotte, North Carolina April 18, 2012. When Bank of America reports first-quarter earnings on Thursday, analysts will be looking for signs the bank can boost earnings at a time of low interest rates and new regulations. The second-biggest U.S. bank by assets has lagged its peers in recovering from the financial crisis largely because of losses and lawsuits tied to its 2008 Countrywide Financial purchase. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
  •  - A pedestrian walks past a Bank of America ATM in Charlotte

    A pedestrian walks past a Bank of America ATM in Charlotte

    Posted: 4/18/2012 8:05:47 PM EST
    A pedestrian walks past a Bank of America ATM in Charlotte, North Carolina April 18, 2012. When Bank of America reports first-quarter earnings on Thursday, analysts will be looking for signs the bank can boost earnings at a time of low interest rates and new regulations. The second-biggest U.S. bank by assets has lagged its peers in recovering from the financial crisis largely because of losses and lawsuits tied to its 2008 Countrywide Financial purchase. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
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    Posted: 4/4/2012 3:31:12 PM EST
    Carmen Bradley, left, listens as Dennis Lamond, right, describes a lightning strike that injured him and another worker and killed Bradley's husband Bryan last September as the men worked on the revel casino project in Atlantic City N.J. Bradley, Lamond and a third victim filed lawsuits on April 4, 2012 against two construction firms involved in the project. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)
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    Posted: 4/4/2012 3:31:12 PM EST
    Carmen Bradley, left, wipes away tears as Dennis Lamond, right, describes a lightning strike that injured him and another worker, and killed Bradley's husband, Bryan, while they worked on the Revel casino project in Atlantic City N.J. last September. They filed lawsuits on April 4, 2012 against two construction firms involved in the project and spoke about the suits at a news conference in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)
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    Posted: 3/29/2012 5:05:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 13, 2004 file photo, Jack Whittaker heads toward the Putnam County Judicial Annex in Winfield, W.Va. Whittaker won the $315 million Powerball jackpot in 2002, but fell victim to scandals, lawsuits and personal setbacks. With a massive multi-state lottery jackpot up for grabs, plenty of folks are fantasizing how to spend the money. But doing it the right way ? protecting your riches, your identity and your sanity ? takes some thought and planning. Some do's and don'ts on the very slim chance you pull the winning ticket for the $476 million Mega Millions drawing Friday. (AP Photo/Jeff Gentner, File)
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    Posted: 3/28/2012 7:40:46 PM EST
    This combo made from file photos shows former IMF leader Dominique Strauss-Kahn on June 6, 2011, left, and Nafissatou Diallo on July 28, 2011, in New York. While Strauss-Kahn faces fresh charges in his native France amid a prostitution ring probe, a judge in New York may decide whether to allow a civil case against him filed by Diallo, the hotel maid who said he sexually assaulted her. The first hearing is likely to deal with complex laws that shield diplomats from prosecution and lawsuits in their host countries. (AP Photos)
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    Posted: 3/23/2012 11:00:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 16, 2009 file photo, Jennifer Nettles, right, and Kristian Bush of the band "Sugarland" perform at the CMT Music Awards in Nashville, Tenn. A Judge, on Friday, March 23, 2012, ordered Nettles to give a deposition next month in lawsuits filed over August's deadly Indiana State Fair stage collapse. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, file)
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    Posted: 3/23/2012 5:15:46 PM EST
    The Supreme Court Building is seen, Thursday, March 5, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Supreme Court has several options in ruling on President Barack Obama?s health care overhaul, from upholding the law to striking it down in its entirety. The court also could avoid deciding the law?s constitutionality at all, if it finds the lawsuits challenging the law are premature. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
  •  - Passengers are seen at AeroSur airlines counter at the El Alto airport in the outskirts of La Paz

    Passengers are seen at AeroSur airlines counter at the El Alto airport in the outskirts of La Paz

    Posted: 3/16/2012 8:52:11 PM EST
    Passengers are seen at AeroSur airlines counter at the El Alto airport in the outskirts of La Paz, March 16, 2012. Bolivia's tax authority confirmed on Friday an order to seize the proceeds of Aerosur for a tax debt, aggravating economic and technical problems that threaten to paralyze the country's largest private airline. The company, which faces increasing competition from the state BoA recently lost one of several lawsuits for tax debts of more than a decade and by the end of last year totalled 1.338 million bolivianos (192 million dollars), said service National Tax (SIN). REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
  •  - Passengers are seen at AeroSur airlines counter at the El Alto airport in the outskirts of La Paz

    Passengers are seen at AeroSur airlines counter at the El Alto airport in the outskirts of La Paz

    Posted: 3/16/2012 8:46:09 PM EST
    Passengers are seen at AeroSur airlines counter at the El Alto airport in the outskirts of La Paz, March 16, 2012. Bolivia's tax authority confirmed on Friday an order to seize the proceeds of Aerosur for a tax debt, aggravating economic and technical problems that threaten to paralyze the country's largest private airline. The company, which faces increasing competition from the state BoA recently lost one of several lawsuits for tax debts of more than a decade and by the end of last year totalled 1.338 million bolivianos (192 million dollars), said service National Tax (SIN) REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
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    Posted: 3/14/2012 2:45:45 PM EST
    FILE - In a Thursday, Sept. 30, 2010 file photo, Johnson & Johnson Chairman and CEO William Weldon testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing. Johnson & Johnson raised compensation 8 percent last year for outgoing CEO Weldon, despite a seemingly endless string of product recalls, mediocre 2011 results and ongoing lawsuits and government probes over some products and marketing practices. Weldon, who will step down on April 26 but remain chairman of the board for the time being, raked in total compensation valued at $23.4 million last year, up from $21.6 million in 2010. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf, File)
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    Posted: 3/13/2012 8:40:49 PM EST
    A guard holds open a door to the barber shop at a new civil detention facility for low-risk inmates in Karnes City, Texas, on Tuesday, March 13, 2012. Federal officials are holding up the new facility as the centerpiece of an initiative to treat those facing immigration violation charges more humanely after lawsuits filed in past years. (AP Photo/Will Weissert)
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    Posted: 3/13/2012 8:40:49 PM EST
    Gary Mead, executive associate director for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement?s Enforcement and Removal Operations, speaks to reporters by a soccer field at a new civil detention facility for low-risk detainees in Karnes City, Texas, on Tuesday, March 13, 2012. Federal officials are holding up the new facility as the centerpiece of an initiative to treat those facing immigration violation charges more humanely after lawsuits filed in past years. (AP Photo/Will Weissert)
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    Posted: 3/13/2012 8:40:49 PM EST
    A hallway near the medical and dental clinics at a new civil detention facility for low-risk inmates in Karnes City, Texas, on Tuesday, March 13, 2012. Federal officials are holding up the new facility as the centerpiece of an initiative to treat those facing immigration violation charges more humanely after lawsuits filed in past years. (AP Photo/Will Weissert)
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    Posted: 3/13/2012 8:40:49 PM EST
    Gary Mead, executive associate director for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement?s Enforcement and Removal Operations, surveys clothing and toiletries that will be issued to detainees at a new civil detention facility for low-risk inmates in Karnes City, Texas, on Tuesday, March 13, 2012. Federal officials are holding up the new facility as the centerpiece of an initiative to treat those facing immigration violation charges more humanely after lawsuits filed in past years. (AP Photo/Will Weissert)
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    Posted: 3/13/2012 8:40:49 PM EST
    A guard walks by rooms at a new civil detention facility for low-risk inmates in Karnes City, Texas, on Tuesday, March 13, 2012. Federal officials are holding up the new facility as the centerpiece of an initiative to treat those facing immigration violation charges more humanely after lawsuits filed in past years. (AP Photo/Will Weissert)
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    Posted: 3/3/2012 10:30:47 AM EST
    FILE - Two ships float near in a massive oil slick spreading in the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded off the coast of Louisiana. Florida Gov. Charlie Crist flew above the plume on in this April 27, 2010 file photo. BP agreed late Friday March 2, 2012 to settle lawsuits brought by more than 100,000 fishermen who lost work, cleanup workers who got sick and others who claimed harm from the oil giant's 2010 Gulf of Mexico disaster, the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history. The momentous settlement will have no cap to compensate the plaintiffs, though BP PLC estimated it would have to pay out about $7.8 billion, making it one of the largest class-action settlements ever. After the Exxon Valdez disaster in 1989, the company ultimately settled with the U.S. government for $1 billion, which would be about $1.8 billion today. (AP Photo/Brendan Farrington, File)
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    Posted: 3/3/2012 10:30:47 AM EST
    FILE - Shrimp boats are seen parked in Venice, La., near the mouth of the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico, in this April 30, 2010 file photo. BP agreed late Friday March 2, 2012 to settle lawsuits brought by more than 100,000 fishermen who lost work, cleanup workers who got sick and others who claimed harm from the oil giant's 2010 Gulf of Mexico disaster, the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history. The momentous settlement will have no cap to compensate the plaintiffs, though BP PLC estimated it would have to pay out about $7.8 billion, making it one of the largest class-action settlements ever. After the Exxon Valdez disaster in 1989, the company ultimately settled with the U.S. government for $1 billion, which would be about $1.8 billion today. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)


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