Lawsuits Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 6/7/2012 6:40:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this July, 1975 file photo, Atlanta Falcons safety Ray Easterling is shown. A concussion-related lawsuit bringing together scores of cases has been filed in federal court, accusing the NFL of hiding information that linked football-related head trauma to permanent brain injuries. Lawyers for former players say more than 80 pending lawsuits are consolidated in the "master complaint" filed Thursday, June 7, 2012, in Philadelphia. Mary Ann Easterling will remain a plaintiff despite the April suicide of her husband, Ray, who had been a named plaintiff in a suit filed last year. (AP Photo/File)
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    Posted: 6/5/2012 12:05:46 AM EST
    FILE - This Sept. 28, 2011 file photo shows co-owner Eric Jensen as he examines cantaloupe on the Jensen Farms near Holly, Colo. The Food and Drug Administration recalled 300,000 cases of cantaloupe grown on the Jensen Farms after connecting it with a listeria outbreak. Settlement talks are under way in lawsuits against Jensen Farms identified as the source of a nationwide listeria outbreak last fall that killed at least 30. Attorneys for Jensen Farms in Holly, Colo., and for 39 people who were sickened or died said Monday a deal could be worked out by this fall. Both sides say any settlement with Jensen Farms wouldn't include other defendants, such as distributors and retailers. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)
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    Posted: 5/31/2012 2:15:48 PM EST
    An advertising mural for Tropicana orange juice greets visitors at Union Station in Washington, Wednesday, May 30, 2012. Orange juice maker Tropicana markets its brand as fresh off the tree, but a series of lawsuits nationwide claim the company?s juice is so heavily processed it shouldn?t be called ?natural.? (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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    Posted: 5/30/2012 6:40:48 PM EST
    Jim Darby and Patrick Bova, a couple for the last 48 years, tell their story during a news conference Wednesday, May 30, 2012, in Chicago. More than two dozen gay Illinois couples who say it?s unconstitutional for the state to deny them the right to marry and will file two lawsuits Wednesday, a move advocates believe could lead to legalized gay marriage in Illinois. The two lawsuits, filed by attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois and New-York based gay advocacy group Lambda Legal, include couples from Chicago and its suburbs, Bloomington and Marion. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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    Posted: 5/30/2012 6:40:48 PM EST
    John Knight, director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Project of the ACLU of Illinois, speaks at a news conference Wednesday, May 30, 2012, in Chicago. More than two dozen gay Illinois couples who say it?s unconstitutional for the state to deny them the right to marry and will file two lawsuits Wednesday, a move advocates believe could lead to legalized gay marriage in Illinois. The two lawsuits, filed by attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois and New-York based gay advocacy group Lambda Legal, include couples from Chicago and its suburbs, Bloomington and Marion. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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    Posted: 5/30/2012 6:40:47 PM EST
    Camilla Taylor, marriage project director for Lambda Legal, speaks at a news conference, Wednesday, May 30, 2012, in Chicago. More than two dozen gay Illinois couples who say it?s unconstitutional for the state to deny them the right to marry and will file two lawsuits Wednesday, a move advocates believe could lead to legalized gay marriage in Illinois. The two lawsuits, filed by attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois and New-York based gay advocacy group Lambda Legal, include couples from Chicago and its suburbs, Bloomington and Marion. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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    Posted: 5/30/2012 6:40:47 PM EST
    Claudia Mercado, left, holds her son Indigo Lopez-Mercado as Angelica Lopez right, holds the couples other child Isabel Lopez-Mercado as they gather for a news conference, Wednesday, May 30, 2012, in Chicago. More than two dozen gay Illinois couples who say it?s unconstitutional for the state to deny them the right to marry and will file two lawsuits Wednesday, a move advocates believe could lead to legalized gay marriage in Illinois. The two lawsuits, filed by attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois and New-York based gay advocacy group Lambda Legal, include couples from Chicago and its suburbs, Bloomington and Marion. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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    Posted: 5/30/2012 6:40:47 PM EST
    In this June 1, 2011 file photo, Janean Watkins, left, and Lakeesha Harris embrace after being the first in line to obtain a civil union license from the Cook County Office of Vital Records in Chicago. They are among more than two dozen same-sex couples filing lawsuits Wednesday, May 30, 2012, challenging the constitutionality of Illinois? marriage laws. Advocates for the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois and Lambda Legal are each filing a lawsuit on behalf of the couples. Their goal is to make same-sex marriage legal. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)
  •  - Jay Lee, only son of Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee, awaits his father's arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul

    Jay Lee, only son of Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee, awaits his father's arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul

    Posted: 5/30/2012 6:41:34 AM EST
    REFILE - CORRECTING VERB Jay Lee, the only son of Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee, awaits his father's arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul following the latter's visit to several European countries and Japan, May 24, 2012. A family feud at Samsung Group, parent of the world's largest electronics company by revenue, could upset the smooth handover of control of a smartphones-to-ships conglomerate whose $234 billion annual sales are bigger than the economy of Singapore. Lee Kun-hee, South Korea's richest man and chairman of Samsung Electronics on May 30, 2012 defends three lawsuits from his elder brother, Lee Maeng-hee, a sister and another relative, who claim $1 billion of assets - mainly shares in Samsung Life, an insurance company at the heart of a web of Samsung Group cross-shareholdings. Lee is unlikely to attend the case at the Seoul Central District Court. Picture taken May 24, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TELECOMS)
  •  - Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee reacts as he answers reporters' questions upon his arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul

    Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee reacts as he answers reporters' questions upon his arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul

    Posted: 5/29/2012 4:26:57 PM EST
    Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee reacts as he answers reporters' questions upon his arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul after he visited several European countries and Japan, May 24, 2012. A family feud at Samsung Group, parent of the world's largest electronics company by revenue, could upset the smooth handover of control of a smartphones-to-ships conglomerate whose $234 billion annual sales are bigger than the economy of Singapore. Lee Kun-hee, South Korea's richest man and chairman of Samsung Electronics on May 30, 2012 defends three lawsuits from his elder brother, Lee Maeng-hee, a sister and another relative, who claim $1 billion of assets - mainly shares in Samsung Life, an insurance company at the heart of a web of Samsung Group cross-shareholdings. Lee is unlikely to attend the case at the Seoul Central District Court. Picture taken May 24, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW HEADSHOT)
  •  - Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee arrives at Gimpo airport in Seoul after he visited several European countries and Japan

    Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee arrives at Gimpo airport in Seoul after he visited several European countries and Japan

    Posted: 5/29/2012 4:25:25 PM EST
    Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee arrives at Gimpo airport in Seoul after he visited several European countries and Japan, May 24, 2012. A family feud at Samsung Group, parent of the world's largest electronics company by revenue, could upset the smooth handover of control of a smartphones-to-ships conglomerate whose $234 billion annual sales are bigger than the economy of Singapore. Lee Kun-hee, South Korea's richest man and chairman of Samsung Electronics on May 30, 2012 defends three lawsuits from his elder brother, Lee Maeng-hee, a sister and another relative, who claim $1 billion of assets - mainly shares in Samsung Life, an insurance company at the heart of a web of Samsung Group cross-shareholdings. Lee is unlikely to attend the case at the Seoul Central District Court. Picture taken May 24, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW HEADSHOT)
  •  - Jay Lee, only son of Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee, yawns as he awaits his father's arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul

    Jay Lee, only son of Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee, yawns as he awaits his father's arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul

    Posted: 5/29/2012 4:24:01 PM EST
    Jay Lee, only son of Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee, yawns as he awaits his father's arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul following the latter's visit to several European countries and Japan, May 24, 2012. A family feud at Samsung Group, parent of the world's largest electronics company by revenue, could upset the smooth handover of control of a smartphones-to-ships conglomerate whose $234 billion annual sales are bigger than the economy of Singapore. Lee Kun-hee, South Korea's richest man and chairman of Samsung Electronics on May 30, 2012 defends three lawsuits from his elder brother, Lee Maeng-hee, a sister and another relative, who claim $1 billion of assets - mainly shares in Samsung Life, an insurance company at the heart of a web of Samsung Group cross-shareholdings. Lee is unlikely to attend the case at the Seoul Central District Court. Picture taken May 24, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
  •  - Jay Lee, only son of Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee, yawns as he awaits his father's arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul

    Jay Lee, only son of Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee, yawns as he awaits his father's arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul

    Posted: 5/29/2012 4:22:15 PM EST
    Jay Lee (R), only son of Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee, yawns as he awaits his father's arrival at Gimpo airport in Seoul following the latter's visit to several European countries and Japan, May 24, 2012. A family feud at Samsung Group, parent of the world's largest electronics company by revenue, could upset the smooth handover of control of a smartphones-to-ships conglomerate whose $234 billion annual sales are bigger than the economy of Singapore. Lee Kun-hee, South Korea's richest man and chairman of Samsung Electronics on May 30, 2012 defends three lawsuits from his elder brother, Lee Maeng-hee, a sister and another relative, who claim $1 billion of assets - mainly shares in Samsung Life, an insurance company at the heart of a web of Samsung Group cross-shareholdings. Lee is unlikely to attend the case at the Seoul Central District Court. Picture taken May 24, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
  •  - Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee arrives at Gimpo airport in Seoul after he visited several European countries and Japan

    Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee arrives at Gimpo airport in Seoul after he visited several European countries and Japan

    Posted: 5/29/2012 4:20:23 PM EST
    Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Kun-Hee arrives at Gimpo airport in Seoul after he visited several European countries and Japan, May 24, 2012. A family feud at Samsung Group, parent of the world's largest electronics company by revenue, could upset the smooth handover of control of a smartphones-to-ships conglomerate whose $234 billion annual sales are bigger than the economy of Singapore. Lee Kun-hee, South Korea's richest man and chairman of Samsung Electronics on May 30, 2012 defends three lawsuits from his elder brother, Lee Maeng-hee, a sister and another relative, who claim $1 billion of assets - mainly shares in Samsung Life, an insurance company at the heart of a web of Samsung Group cross-shareholdings. Lee is unlikely to attend the case at the Seoul Central District Court. Picture taken May 24, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW HEADSHOT)
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    Posted: 5/15/2012 10:15:52 AM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown points to a chart showing that if voters approve his tax increase initiative in November, that K-14 education funding will be increased, as he discusses his revised state budget plan during a Capitol news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, May 14, 2012. Brown said the budget shortfall swelled from $9.2 billion predicted in January to $16 billion, in part because tax collections have not come in as high as expected and lawsuits and federal requirements that have blocked billions of dollars in state cuts. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 5/15/2012 10:15:52 AM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown points to a chart showing how his budget plans will eventually reduce the budget deficit over the next few years as he discusses his revised state budget plan during a Capitol news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, May 14, 2012. Brown said the budget shortfall swelled from $9.2 billion predicted in January to $16 billion, in part because tax collections have not come in as high as expected and lawsuits and federal requirements that have blocked billions of dollars in state cuts. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 5/15/2012 10:15:51 AM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown discusses his revised state budget plan during a Capitol news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, May 14, 2012. Brown said the budget shortfall swelled from $9.2 billion predicted in January to $16 billion, in part because tax collections have not come in as high as expected and lawsuits and federal requirements that have blocked billions of dollars in state cuts. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 5/14/2012 11:25:46 PM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown leaves a news conference after he unveiled his revised state budget plan at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, May 14, 2012. Brown said the budget shortfall swelled from $9.2 billion predicted in January to $16 billion, in part because tax collections have not come in as high as expected and lawsuits and federal requirements that have blocked billions of dollars in state cuts. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 5/14/2012 11:25:46 PM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown waves to a tour group as he returns to his office after unveiling his revised state budget plan at a Capitol news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, May 14, 2012. Brown said the budget shortfall swelled from $9.2 billion predicted in January to $16 billion, in part because tax collections have not come in as high as expected and lawsuits and federal requirements that have blocked billions of dollars in state cuts. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
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    Posted: 5/14/2012 11:25:46 PM EST
    Gov. Jerry Brown discusses his revised state budget plan during a Capitol news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, May 14, 2012. Brown said the budget shortfall swelled from $9.2 billion predicted in January to $16 billion, in part because tax collections have not come in as high as expected and lawsuits and federal requirements that have blocked billions of dollars in state cuts. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)