Lawsuits Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 1/23/2012 1:35:46 PM EST
    The owner of the Tunisian private channel Nessma TV, Nabil Karoui, center, leaves the Tunis courthouse after attending his trial, Monday, Jan. 23, 2012. Nearly 140 lawyers filed lawsuits against Karoui for 'violating sacred values' and 'disturbing public order' after his station broadcast a version of the French-Iranian film Persepolis dubbed in Tunisian dialect. The film, which won the jury prize at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival, contains a scene showing a character representing God. Depictions of God are considered sacrilege in Islam. The trial was postponed until April 2012. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)
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    Posted: 1/8/2012 12:15:47 PM EST
    In this Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2011 photo, Patricia Votre looks at a care package that was given to her by nurses after the death of her infant son Miles in Woodbridge, Conn. Connecticut lawmakers and lawyers say a 2005 state law aimed at preventing frivolous medical malpractice lawsuits has had the unintended consequence of keeping many apparently legitimate claims out of state courts. After Votre's son died due to infection in 2003, she filed a medical malpractice lawsuit against her doctors, but Votre was never able to get her case before a jury. A judge dismissed her lawsuit based on a technicality added to the state?s medical malpractice law in 2005 as part of the national ?tort reform? debate. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
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    Posted: 1/8/2012 12:15:47 PM EST
    In this Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2011 photo, a hand and foot impression of Patricia Votre's son Miles are in a keepsake box in Woodbridge, Conn. Connecticut lawmakers and lawyers say a 2005 state law aimed at preventing frivolous medical malpractice lawsuits has had the unintended consequence of keeping many apparently legitimate claims out of state courts. After Votre's son Miles died due to infection in 2003, she filed a medical malpractice lawsuit against her doctors, but Votre was never able to get her case before a jury. A judge dismissed her lawsuit based on a technicality added to the state?s medical malpractice law in 2005 as part of the national ?tort reform? debate. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
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    Posted: 1/8/2012 12:15:47 PM EST
    In this Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2011 photo, Patricia Votre poses for a photograph at home in Woodbridge, Conn. Connecticut lawmakers and lawyers say a 2005 state law aimed at preventing frivolous medical malpractice lawsuits has had the unintended consequence of keeping many apparently legitimate claims out of state courts. After Votre's son died due to infection in 2003, she filed a medical malpractice lawsuit against her doctors, but Votre was never able to get her case before a jury. A judge dismissed her lawsuit based on a technicality added to the state?s medical malpractice law in 2005 as part of the national ?tort reform? debate. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
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    Posted: 12/25/2011 11:15:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 19, 2010 file photo, New York City resident Lori Angelone holds a banner describing her husband Louis' ailments outside Manhattan Federal Court in New York. More than 1,600 people suing over their exposure to World Trade Center dust must decide by Jan. 2 whether to keep fighting in court, or drop their lawsuits and apply for benefits from a government fund. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano, File)
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    Posted: 12/25/2011 11:15:44 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2001 file photo, firefighters make their way over the ruins of the World Trade Center through clouds of dust and smoke at ground zero in New York. More than 1,600 people suing over their exposure to World Trade Center dust must decide by Jan. 2 whether to keep fighting in court, or drop their lawsuits and apply for benefits from a government fund. (AP Photo/Stan Honda, Pool, File)
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    Posted: 12/22/2011 6:00:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2011 file photo, University of California, Davis Police Lt. John Pike uses pepper spray to move Occupy UC Davis protesters while blocking their exit from the school's quad in Davis, Calif. Most major Occupy Wall Street encampments in the U.S. have been dispersed, but they live on in a flurry of lawsuits in which protesters are asserting their constitutional rights to free speech and assembly and challenging authorities' use of force to break up tent cities. (AP Photo/The Enterprise, Wayne Tilcock, File)
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    Posted: 11/25/2011 6:25:48 PM EST
    NBA Players Roger Mason, Jr., right, and Charles Jenkins, left, look on as Billy Hunter speak during a news conference Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011 in New York. After filing two separate antitrust lawsuits against the league in different states, NBA players are consolidating their efforts and have turned to the courts in Minnesota as their chosen venue. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
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    Posted: 11/25/2011 6:25:48 PM EST
    NBA Player Roger Mason, Jr., joins volunteers as they distribute turkeys in Harlem as Part of Associationís Nationwide Season of Feeding Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011, in New York. After filing two separate antitrust lawsuits against the league in different states, NBA players are consolidating their efforts and have turned to the courts in Minnesota as their chosen venue. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
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    Posted: 11/23/2011 11:30:47 PM EST
    NBA Player Roger Mason, Jr., joins volunteers as they distribute turkeys in Harlem as Part of Association's Nationwide Season of Feeding Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011, in New York. After filing two separate antitrust lawsuits against the league in different states, NBA players are consolidating their efforts and have turned to the courts in Minnesota as their chosen venue. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
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    Posted: 11/23/2011 11:30:47 PM EST
    NBA player Roger Mason Jr. speaks as recent draft pick Charles Jenkins, left, and Billy Hunter, executive director of the NBA players union, listen during a news conference Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011, in New York. After filing two separate antitrust lawsuits against the league in different states, NBA players are consolidating their efforts and have turned to the courts in Minnesota as their chosen venue. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
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    Posted: 10/27/2011 4:30:46 PM EST
    Betty Dukes, left, shakes hands with Patricia Surgeson as they sit with Edith Arana, right, before a news conference at the Equal Rights Advocates office in San Francisco, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011. Dukes, Surgeson, and Arana are all plaintiffs in Dukes v. Wal-Mart. A group of current and former female Wal-Mart workers in California have filed the first of an expected series of class action lawsuits alleging the world's largest retailer discriminates against women. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
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    Posted: 10/27/2011 4:30:45 PM EST
    Betty Dukes, right, a plaintiff in Dukes v. Wal-Mart, and attorney Arcelia Hurtado listen to speakers at a news conference at the Equal Rights Advocates office in San Francisco, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011. A group of current and former female Wal-Mart workers in California have filed the first of an expected series of class action lawsuits alleging the world's largest retailer discriminates against women. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
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    Posted: 10/27/2011 4:30:45 PM EST
    Attorney Brad Seligman, right, speaks as Betty Dukes, from left, Patricia Surgeson and Edith Arana, all plaintiffs in Dukes v. Wal-Mart, listen at a news conference at the Equal Rights Advocates office in San Francisco, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011. A group of current and former female Wal-Mart workers in California have filed the first of an expected series of class action lawsuits alleging the world's largest retailer discriminates against women. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
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    Posted: 10/20/2011 11:00:49 PM EST
    FILE - In this Friday, April 23, 2010 file photo, with law enforcement supporters behind her, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signs immigration bill SB1070 into law in Phoenix. Gov. Jan Brewer faces a Friday deadline for filing responses to two lawsuits that seek to overturn Arizona's new immigration law. Brewer was sued in four of the five legal challenges that have been filed to the law since she approved it in April. Brewer's new book "Scorpions For Breakfast" will be released Nov. 1. The foreword is written by Sarah Palin. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
  •  - A general view shows a judicial trial inside an assizes car in Taihe district of Jinzhou

    A general view shows a judicial trial inside an assizes car in Taihe district of Jinzhou

    Posted: 10/20/2011 6:49:30 AM EST
    A general view shows a judicial trial inside an assizes car in Taihe district of Jinzhou, Liaoning province October 20, 2011. The Liaoning High People's Court distributed 100 assizes car to 57 local people's courts to facilitate the solving of lawsuits of villagers living in remote areas, local media reported. REUTERS/China Daily (CHINA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY) CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA
  •  - United States Attorney Laura Duffy displays retail marijuana packaging while announcing law enforcement action against California's marijuana industry in Sacramento.

    United States Attorney Laura Duffy displays retail marijuana packaging while announcing law enforcement action against California's marijuana industry in Sacramento.

    Posted: 10/7/2011 5:38:14 PM EST
    United States Attorney Laura Duffy displays retail marijuana packaging while announcing law enforcement action against California's marijuana industry in Sacramento, California October 7, 2011. The U.S. Attorneys in California are targeting commercial marijuana operations through civil forfeiture lawsuits against property owners and criminal arrests of commercial marijuana activities. REUTERS/Max Whittaker (UNITED STATES - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY POLITICS CRIME LAW)
  •  - Retail marijuana packaging is displayed at a U.S. Attorney's news conference in Sacramento.

    Retail marijuana packaging is displayed at a U.S. Attorney's news conference in Sacramento.

    Posted: 10/7/2011 5:35:40 PM EST
    Retail marijuana packaging is displayed at a U.S. Attorney's news conference in Sacramento, California October 7, 2011. The U.S. Attorneys in California are targeting commercial marijuana operations through civil forfeiture lawsuits against property owners and criminal arrests of commercial marijuana activities. REUTERS/Max Whittaker (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS DRUGS SOCIETY CRIME LAW)
  •  - United States Attorney Benjamin Wagner announces law enforcement action against California's marijuana industry in Sacramento

    United States Attorney Benjamin Wagner announces law enforcement action against California's marijuana industry in Sacramento

    Posted: 10/7/2011 5:33:02 PM EST
    United States Attorney Benjamin Wagner (R) announces law enforcement action against California's marijuana industry in Sacramento, California October 7, 2011. The U.S. Attorneys in California are targeting commercial marijuana operations through civil forfeiture lawsuits against property owners and criminal arrests of commercial marijuana activities. REUTERS/Max Whittaker (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS DRUGS SOCIETY)
  •  - United States Attorney Melinda Haag announces law enforcement action against California's marijuana industry in Sacramento

    United States Attorney Melinda Haag announces law enforcement action against California's marijuana industry in Sacramento

    Posted: 10/7/2011 5:31:09 PM EST
    United States Attorney Melinda Haag (R) announces law enforcement action against California's marijuana industry in Sacramento, California October 7, 2011. The U.S. attorneys in California are targeting commercial marijuana operations through civil forfeiture lawsuits against property owners and criminal arrests of commercial marijuana activities. REUTERS/Max Whittaker (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW DRUGS SOCIETY POLITICS)