Landslide Photos on Townhall

  •  - A rescue worker runs past a landslide on a buried road to Maomaoshan village as a policeman keeps people going through, in Luozehe town after two earthquakes hit Yiliang

    A rescue worker runs past a landslide on a buried road to Maomaoshan village as a policeman keeps people going through, in Luozehe town after two earthquakes hit Yiliang

    Posted: 9/9/2012 6:59:51 AM EST
    A rescue worker runs past a landslide on a buried road to Maomaoshan village as a policeman keeps people going through, in Luozehe town after two earthquakes hit Yiliang, Yunnan province September 9, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Lee
  •  - A landslide blocks rescue workers along a road to Maomaoshan village in Luozehe town, after two earthquakes hit Yiliang

    A landslide blocks rescue workers along a road to Maomaoshan village in Luozehe town, after two earthquakes hit Yiliang

    Posted: 9/9/2012 6:59:51 AM EST
    A landslide blocks rescue workers along a road to Maomaoshan village in Luozehe town, after two earthquakes hit Yiliang, Yunnan province September 9, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Lee
  •  - Local resident Hu Qin sits on a rope bridge as she is blocked by a landslide from going home to look for her parents living in a mountain in Luozehe town, after two earthquakes hit Yiliang

    Local resident Hu Qin sits on a rope bridge as she is blocked by a landslide from going home to look for her parents living in a mountain in Luozehe town, after two earthquakes hit Yiliang

    Posted: 9/9/2012 6:59:51 AM EST
    Local resident Hu Qin sits on a rope bridge as she is blocked by a landslide from going home to look for her parents living in a mountain in Luozehe town, after two earthquakes hit Yiliang, Yunnan province September 9, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Lee
  •  - Damaged houses next to a landslide are seen at the foot of a mountain in Luozehe town after two earthquakes hit Yiliang

    Damaged houses next to a landslide are seen at the foot of a mountain in Luozehe town after two earthquakes hit Yiliang

    Posted: 9/9/2012 2:58:26 AM EST
    Damaged houses next to a landslide are seen at the foot of a mountain in Luozehe town after two earthquakes hit Yiliang, Yunnan province September 8, 2012. Rescuers in southwestern China tried on Saturday to reach remote communities rocked by back-to-back earthquakes that killed at least 89 people and damaged many thousands of buildings, state media reported said. Shallow 5.6 magnitude quakes struck an impoverished, mountainous part of the country with poor infrastructure and communications on Friday and the death toll could rise as news trickled in from cut-off areas, the Xinhua news agency said. REUTERS/Jason Lee
  •  - Damaged houses next to a landslide are seen at the foot of a mountain in Luozehe town after two earthquakes hit Yiliang

    Damaged houses next to a landslide are seen at the foot of a mountain in Luozehe town after two earthquakes hit Yiliang

    Posted: 9/8/2012 9:08:46 AM EST
    Damaged houses next to a landslide are seen at the foot of a mountain in Luozehe town after two earthquakes hit Yiliang, Yunnan province September 8, 2012. Rescuers in southwestern China tried on Saturday to reach remote communities rocked by back-to-back earthquakes that killed at least 89 people and damaged many thousands of buildings, state media reported said. REUTERS/Jason Lee
  •  - A still image taken from video shows a tracking shot of a vehicle passing by an area affected by a landslide after an earthquake hit Yiliang county in Zhaotong city, in Yunnan province

    A still image taken from video shows a tracking shot of a vehicle passing by an area affected by a landslide after an earthquake hit Yiliang county in Zhaotong city, in Yunnan province

    Posted: 9/7/2012 9:16:22 AM EST
    A still image taken from video shows a tracking shot of a vehicle passing by an area affected by a landslide after an earthquake hit Yiliang county in Zhaotong city, in Yunnan province September 7, 2012. REUTERS/CCTV via Reuters TV
  •  - A still image taken from video shows a tracking shot of a vehicle passing by an area affected by a landslide after an earthquake hit Yiliang county in Zhaotong city, in Yunnan province

    A still image taken from video shows a tracking shot of a vehicle passing by an area affected by a landslide after an earthquake hit Yiliang county in Zhaotong city, in Yunnan province

    Posted: 9/7/2012 9:16:22 AM EST
    A still image taken from video shows a tracking shot of a vehicle passing by an area affected by a landslide after an earthquake hit Yiliang county in Zhaotong city, in Yunnan province September 7, 2012. REUTERS/CCTV via Reuters TV
  •  - 
              Earth partially covers a road after a landslide was triggered by an earthquake in Samara, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012.  A powerful, magnitude-7.6 earthquake shook Costa Rica an

    Earth partially covers a road after a landslide was triggered by an earthquake in Samara, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012. A powerful, magnitude-7.6 earthquake shook Costa Rica an

    Posted: 9/5/2012 1:48:22 PM EST
    Earth partially covers a road after a landslide was triggered by an earthquake in Samara, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012. A powerful, magnitude-7.6 earthquake shook Costa Rica and a wide swath of Central America on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Danica Coto)
  •  - Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Posted: 8/24/2012 10:54:22 AM EST
    A man talks about his experience at his home, where a landslide caused by heavy showers due to the passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen through his window, on the hills of Carenage, about 10 km (6 miles) west of the capital Port-of-Spain, August 23, 1012. REUTERS/Andrea De Silva
  •  - Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Posted: 8/24/2012 10:54:22 AM EST
    A man talks about his experience at his home, where a landslide caused by heavy showers due to the passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen through his window, on the hills of Carenage, about 10 km (6 miles) west of the capital Port-of-Spain, August 23, 1012. REUTERS/Andrea De Silva
  •  - Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Posted: 8/24/2012 10:54:22 AM EST
    A man talks about his experience at his home, where a landslide caused by heavy showers due to the passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen through his window, on the hills of Carenage, about 10 km (6 miles) west of the capital Port-of-Spain, August 23, 1012. REUTERS/Andrea De Silva
  •  - Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Posted: 8/24/2012 9:40:45 AM EST
    A man talks about his experience at his home, where a landslide caused by heavy showers due to the passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen through his window, on the hills of Carenage, about 10 km (6 miles) west of the capital Port-of-Spain, August 23, 1012. REUTERS/Andrea De Silva
  •  - Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Posted: 8/24/2012 9:40:45 AM EST
    A man talks about his experience at his home, where a landslide caused by heavy showers due to the passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen through his window, on the hills of Carenage, about 10 km (6 miles) west of the capital Port-of-Spain, August 23, 1012. REUTERS/Andrea De Silva
  •  - Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Man talks at his home, where landslide caused passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen, in Carenage

    Posted: 8/24/2012 9:40:45 AM EST
    A man talks about his experience at his home, where a landslide caused by heavy showers due to the passing of Tropical Storm Isaac can be seen through his window, on the hills of Carenage, about 10 km (6 miles) west of the capital Port-of-Spain, August 23, 1012. REUTERS/Andrea De Silva
  •  - Man looks at cracked walls of his house after landslide near Badong, on the bank of the Yangtze River

    Man looks at cracked walls of his house after landslide near Badong, on the bank of the Yangtze River

    Posted: 8/22/2012 5:42:48 PM EST
    Ma Tianxin looks at the cracked walls of his house after a landslide near Badong, on the bank of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. China relocated 1.3 million people during the 17 years it took to complete the Three Gorges dam. Even after finishing the $59 billion project last month, the threat of landslides along the dam's banks will force tens of thousands to move again. It's a reminder of the social and environmental challenges that have dogged the world's largest hydroelectric project. While there has been little protest among residents who will be relocated a second time, the environmental fallout over other big investments in China has become a hot-button issue ahead of a leadership transition this year. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - A boy stands inside a cracked house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province

    A boy stands inside a cracked house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province

    Posted: 8/22/2012 5:42:48 PM EST
    A boy stands inside a cracked house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Man looks at cracked walls of his house after landslide near Badong, on banks of Yangtze River, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province

    Man looks at cracked walls of his house after landslide near Badong, on banks of Yangtze River, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province

    Posted: 8/22/2012 5:42:48 PM EST
    Ma Tianxin looks at the cracked walls of his house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. China relocated 1.3 million people during the 17 years it took to complete the Three Gorges dam. Even after finishing the $59 billion project last month, the threat of landslides along the dam's banks will force tens of thousands to move again. It's a reminder of the social and environmental challenges that have dogged the world's largest hydroelectric project. While there has been little protest among residents who will be relocated a second time, the environmental fallout over other big investments in China has become a hot-button issue ahead of a leadership transition this year. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Man looks at cracked walls of his house after landslide near Badong, on the bank of the Yangtze River

    Man looks at cracked walls of his house after landslide near Badong, on the bank of the Yangtze River

    Posted: 8/22/2012 5:42:48 PM EST
    Ma Tianxin looks at the cracked walls of his house after a landslide near Badong, on the bank of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. China relocated 1.3 million people during the 17 years it took to complete the Three Gorges dam. Even after finishing the $59 billion project last month, the threat of landslides along the dam's banks will force tens of thousands to move again. It's a reminder of the social and environmental challenges that have dogged the world's largest hydroelectric project. While there has been little protest among residents who will be relocated a second time, the environmental fallout over other big investments in China has become a hot-button issue ahead of a leadership transition this year. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - A boy stands inside a cracked house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province

    A boy stands inside a cracked house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province

    Posted: 8/22/2012 5:42:48 PM EST
    A boy stands inside a cracked house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria
  •  - Man looks at cracked walls of his house after landslide near Badong, on banks of Yangtze River, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province

    Man looks at cracked walls of his house after landslide near Badong, on banks of Yangtze River, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province

    Posted: 8/22/2012 5:42:48 PM EST
    Ma Tianxin looks at the cracked walls of his house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. China relocated 1.3 million people during the 17 years it took to complete the Three Gorges dam. Even after finishing the $59 billion project last month, the threat of landslides along the dam's banks will force tens of thousands to move again. It's a reminder of the social and environmental challenges that have dogged the world's largest hydroelectric project. While there has been little protest among residents who will be relocated a second time, the environmental fallout over other big investments in China has become a hot-button issue ahead of a leadership transition this year. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria


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