Labor Unions Photos on Townhall

  •  -

    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:46 AM EST
    People protest following the removal of fuel subsidy by the Government in Lagos ,Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -

    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:45 AM EST
    People protest past policemen following the removal of fuel subsidy by the Government in Lagos ,Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -

    Posted: 12/1/2011 4:20:45 PM EST
    Leader of Italy's largest labor union Cgil , Susanna Camusso, meets the media during the presentation of a book in Rome, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011. The Italian government's financial rescue plan is yet to be finalized, but already labor unions are denouncing it and some politicians are suggesting they might not back all the anticipated harsh measures meant to save the country from bankruptcy. Camusso, head of Italy's largest labor confederation, the left-leaning Cgil, has demanded a meeting with the government before the Cabinet clears the new measures. News reports suggest Monti's plan includes a proposal to add add at least one year to the 40 years now required in social security tax contributions before a worker is entitled to retire. (AP Photo/Mauro Scrobogna, Lapresse) ITALY OUT
  •  -

    Posted: 10/14/2011 1:55:46 PM EST
    Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi raises his hand as he sits in the lower chamber of parliament to attend a confidence vote, in Rome, Friday, Oct. 14, 2011. Italy's Parliament has begun debating before a confidence vote that will determine the political future of Premier Silvio Berlusconi. The vote will be held later Friday. If Berlusconi loses, he has to resign. With an electorate weary of the scandals engulfing the premier and worried about Italy's economy, Berlusconi is facing repeated calls for his resignation from his political rivals, labor unions and parts of the business community that once considered him their savior. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
  •  -

    Posted: 10/14/2011 1:55:46 PM EST
    Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi sits in the lower chamber to attend a confidence vote, in Rome, Friday, Oct. 14, 2011. Italy's Parliament has begun debating before a confidence vote that will determine the political future of Premier Silvio Berlusconi. The vote will be held later Friday. If Berlusconi loses, he has to resign. With an electorate weary of the scandals engulfing the premier and worried about Italy's economy, Berlusconi is facing repeated calls for his resignation from his political rivals, labor unions and parts of the business community that once considered him their savior. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
  •  -

    Posted: 10/14/2011 1:55:46 PM EST
    Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi sits in the lower chamber to attend a confidence vote, in Rome, Friday, Oct. 14, 2011. Italy's Parliament has begun debating before a confidence vote that will determine the political future of Premier Silvio Berlusconi. The vote will be held later Friday. If Berlusconi loses, he has to resign. With an electorate weary of the scandals engulfing the premier and worried about Italy's economy, Berlusconi is facing repeated calls for his resignation from his political rivals, labor unions and parts of the business community that once considered him their savior. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
  •  -

    Posted: 10/14/2011 1:55:46 PM EST
    Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi sits in the lower chamber to attend a confidence vote, in Rome, Friday, Oct. 14, 2011. Italy's Parliament has begun debating before a confidence vote that will determine the political future of Premier Silvio Berlusconi. The vote will be held later Friday. If Berlusconi loses, he has to resign. With an electorate weary of the scandals engulfing the premier and worried about Italy's economy, Berlusconi is facing repeated calls for his resignation from his political rivals, labor unions and parts of the business community that once considered him their savior. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
  •  -

    Posted: 10/14/2011 1:55:45 PM EST
    Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi sits in the lower chamber to attend a confidence vote, in Rome, Friday, Oct. 14, 2011. Italy's Parliament has begun debating before a confidence vote that will determine the political future of Premier Silvio Berlusconi. The vote will be held later Friday. If Berlusconi loses, he has to resign. With an electorate weary of the scandals engulfing the premier and worried about Italy's economy, Berlusconi is facing repeated calls for his resignation from his political rivals, labor unions and parts of the business community that once considered him their savior. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
  •  - Greek police officers stand guard outside the finance ministry in Athens

    Greek police officers stand guard outside the finance ministry in Athens

    Posted: 10/14/2011 8:01:39 AM EST
    Greek riot police officers stand guard outside the finance ministry during a protest by striking taxi drivers October 14, 2011. Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos pledged on Friday to pass austerity measures in parliament next week in a "fight for our existence", rallying lawmakers despite mounting opposition from labor unions and within the ruling party's own ranks. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
  •  -

    Posted: 10/6/2011 1:10:51 PM EST
    Marchers with Occupy Wall Street lead off a march that included labor unions through Lower Manhattan Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011 in New York. Unions gave a high-profile boost to the long-running protest against Wall Street and economic inequality, with their members joining thousands of protesters in a lower Manhattan march. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  •  -

    Posted: 10/6/2011 3:16:08 AM EST
    Labor unions and others join Occupy Wall Street during a march in Lower Manhattan near Zuccotti Park Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011 in New York. Unions gave a high-profile boost to the long-running protest against Wall Street and economic inequality Wednesday, with their members joining thousands of protesters in a lower Manhattan march. Across the country, students at several colleges walked out of classes in solidarity. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  •  -

    Posted: 10/5/2011 7:35:48 PM EST
    Labor unions and others join Occupy Wall Street during a march in Lower Manhattan as they arrive near Zuccotti Park Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011 in New York. Unions gave a high-profile boost to the long-running protest against Wall Street and economic inequality Wednesday, with their members joining thousands of protesters in a lower Manhattan march. Across the country, students at several colleges walked out of classes in solidarity. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  •  -

    Posted: 9/27/2011 6:45:51 PM EST
    Former Nebraska State Senator Mike Friend speaks in favor of the Keystone XL pipeline during a hearing in Lincoln, Neb., Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. Opponents of the pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from Canada to Texas through the sandhills of Nebraska expressed concern about the pipeline's effect on the Ogallala Aquifer, a vast subterranean reservoir that spans a large swath of the Great Plains and provides water to eight states, while supporters of the pipeline, which include labor unions and business groups, spoke of jobs and development and energy security. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  -

    Posted: 9/27/2011 6:45:51 PM EST
    Rancher Wayne Frost speaks against the Keystone XL pipeline during a hearing in Lincoln, Neb., Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. Opponents of the pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from Canada to Texas through the sandhills of Nebraska expressed concern about the pipeline's effect on the Ogallala Aquifer, a vast subterranean reservoir that spans a large swath of the Great Plains and provides water to eight states, while supporters of the pipeline, which include labor unions and business groups, spoke of jobs and development and energy security. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  -

    Posted: 9/27/2011 6:45:50 PM EST
    Nebraska State Senator Ken Harr speaks against the Keystone XL pipeline during a hearing in Lincoln, Neb., Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. Opponents of the pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from Canada to Texas through the sandhills of Nebraska expressed concern about the pipeline's effect on the Ogallala Aquifer, a vast subterranean reservoir that spans a large swath of the Great Plains and provides water to eight states, while supporters of the pipeline, which include labor unions and business groups, spoke of jobs and development and energy security. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  -

    Posted: 9/27/2011 6:45:50 PM EST
    Demonstrators in support of the Keystone XL pipeline arrive outside Pershing Auditorium near the state Capitol in Lincoln, Neb., Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. Federal officials head to Nebraska?s capital Tuesday as public hearings about a proposed oil pipeline that would span the country from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico move to the state where opposition to the $7 billion plan has been strongest. Opponents of the pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from Canada to Texas through the sandhills of Nebraska expressed concern about the pipeline's effect on the Ogallala Aquifer, a vast subterranean reservoir that spans a large swath of the Great Plains and provides water to eight states, while supporters of the pipeline, which include labor unions and business groups, spoke of jobs and development and energy security. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  -

    Posted: 9/27/2011 6:45:50 PM EST
    Demonstrators for the Keystone XL pipeline, right, and a demonstrator against the pipeline meet outside Pershing Auditorium near the state Capitol in Lincoln, Neb., Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011, before a hearing on the pipeline. Opponents of the pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from Canada to Texas through the sandhills of Nebraska expressed concern about the pipeline's effect on the Ogallala Aquifer, a vast subterranean reservoir that spans a large swath of the Great Plains and provides water to eight states, while supporters of the pipeline, which include labor unions and business groups, spoke of jobs and development and energy security. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  -

    Posted: 9/27/2011 6:45:50 PM EST
    Robert Jones, Vice President of TransCanada Keystone pipelines, takes questions from the media in Lincoln, Neb., Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011, prior to a hearing on the Keystone XL pipeline. Opponents of the pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from Canada to Texas through the sandhills of Nebraska expressed concern about the pipeline's effect on the Ogallala Aquifer, a vast subterranean reservoir that spans a large swath of the Great Plains and provides water to eight states, while supporters of the pipeline, which include labor unions and business groups, spoke of jobs and development and energy security. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  -

    Posted: 9/27/2011 6:45:50 PM EST
    Demonstrators for and against the Keystone XL pipeline gather outside Pershing Auditorium near the state Capitol in Lincoln, Neb., Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. Federal officials head to Nebraska?s capital Tuesday as public hearings about a proposed oil pipeline that would span the country from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico move to the state where opposition to the $7 billion plan has been strongest. Opponents of the pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from Canada to Texas through the sandhills of Nebraska expressed concern about the pipeline's effect on the Ogallala Aquifer, a vast subterranean reservoir that spans a large swath of the Great Plains and provides water to eight states, while supporters of the pipeline, which include labor unions and business groups, spoke of jobs and development and energy security. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  -

    Posted: 9/27/2011 6:45:50 PM EST
    Demonstrators against the Keystone XL pipeline hold signs outside Pershing Auditorium near the state Capitol in Lincoln, Neb., ahead of a hearing on the pipeline, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. Opponents of the pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from Canada to Texas through the sandhills of Nebraska expressed concern about the pipeline's effect on the Ogallala Aquifer, a vast subterranean reservoir that spans a large swath of the Great Plains and provides water to eight states, while supporters of the pipeline, which include labor unions and business groups, spoke of jobs and development and energy security. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)