Judgment Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 3/19/2012 4:35:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 5, 2009 file photo, US singer Michael Jackson speaks at a press conference at the London O2 Arena. Celebrity attorney Mark Geragos and his partner have settled a lawsuit against the owner of a private jet company that secretly recorded Michael Jackson's flight to turn himself in on child molestation charges. Attorneys say the settlement calls for a $2.5 million judgment to be entered against Jeffrey Borer, the owner of now-defunct XtraJet. (AP Photo/Joel Ryan, File)
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    Posted: 3/15/2012 8:00:47 AM EST
    FILE In this May 30, 2003 file photo, a child fighter of the rebel Union of Congolese Patriots, then in control the Congolese town of Bunia, stands near a United Nations armored personnel carrier near the UN compound in Bunia, Congo. Judges at a war crimes tribunal Wednesday, March 14, 2012, convicted Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga of snatching children from the street and turning them into killers, in the International Criminal Court's landmark first judgment 10 years after it was established. Prosecutors said Lubanga led the Union of Congolese Patriots political group and commanded its armed wing, the Patriotic Forces for the Liberation of Congo, which recruited children 'sometimes by force, other times voluntarily' into its ranks to fight in a brutal ethnic conflict in the Ituri region of eastern Congo.(AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo)
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    Posted: 3/14/2012 1:15:53 PM EST
    Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga, center, awaits his verdict in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 14, 2012. Judges have convicted a Congolese warlord of snatching children from the street and turning them into killers. The ruling is the International Criminal Court's first judgment 10 years after it was established as the world's first permanent war crimes tribunal. (AP Photo/Evert-Jan Daniels, Pool)
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    Posted: 3/14/2012 1:15:53 PM EST
    Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga, center, awaits his verdict in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 14, 2012. Judges have convicted a Congolese warlord of snatching children from the street and turning them into killers. The ruling is the International Criminal Court's first judgment 10 years after it was established as the world's first permanent war crimes tribunal. (AP Photo/Evert-Jan Daniels, Pool)
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    Posted: 3/14/2012 1:15:53 PM EST
    Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga, center, arrives for his verdict at the courtroom of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 14, 2012. Judges have convicted a Congolese warlord of snatching children from the street and turning them into killers. The ruling is the International Criminal Court's first judgment 10 years after it was established as the world's first permanent war crimes tribunal. (AP Photo/Evert-Jan Daniels, Pool)
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    Posted: 3/14/2012 1:15:53 PM EST
    Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga, center, awaits his verdict in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 14, 2012. Judges have convicted a Congolese warlord of snatching children from the street and turning them into killers. The ruling is the International Criminal Court's first judgment 10 years after it was established as the world's first permanent war crimes tribunal. (AP Photo/Evert-Jan Daniels, Pool)
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    Posted: 3/14/2012 1:15:53 PM EST
    Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga, center, awaits his verdict in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 14, 2012. Judges have convicted a Congolese warlord of snatching children from the street and turning them into killers. The ruling is the International Criminal Court's first judgment 10 years after it was established as the world's first permanent war crimes tribunal. (AP Photo/Evert-Jan Daniels, Pool)
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    Posted: 3/14/2012 1:15:53 PM EST
    Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga, center, awaits his verdict in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 14, 2012. Judges have convicted a Congolese warlord of snatching children from the street and turning them into killers. The ruling is the International Criminal Court's first judgment 10 years after it was established as the world's first permanent war crimes tribunal. (AP Photo/Evert-Jan Daniels, Pool)
  •  - Camping, California evangelical broadcaster who predicts that Judgment Day will come on May 21, 2011, is seen in this still image from video during 2011 interview

    Camping, California evangelical broadcaster who predicts that Judgment Day will come on May 21, 2011, is seen in this still image from video during 2011 interview

    Posted: 3/9/2012 7:43:18 PM EST
    Harold Camping, the California evangelical broadcaster who predicted that Judgment Day would come on May 21, 2011, is seen in this still image from video during an interview at Family Stations Inc. offices in Oakland, California in this May 16, 2011 file photograph. Camping, who rallied thousands of followers with an end-of-the-world prophecy last year then issued a second failed doomsday forecast, has publicly conceded what was long obvious to many: He was mistaken. In a letter to listeners posted this March 2012 on the website of his Family Radio network, the 90-year-old former civil engineer conceded his error about the biblical Judgment Day. REUTERS/Reuters Television/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
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    Posted: 3/9/2012 7:00:46 AM EST
    Chongqing party secretary Bo Xilai, right shakes hand with a Chinese police officer after a plenary session of the National People's Congress in Beijing, China, Friday, March 9, 2012. Under fire over a scandal that threatens his career, Bo confidently hit back Friday, admitting lapses in judgment while defending the controversial anti-mafia crackdown that made him and his ex-police chief popular. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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    Posted: 3/9/2012 7:00:46 AM EST
    Chongqing party secretary Bo Xilai reacts during a plenary session of the National People's Congress held in Beijing, China, Friday, March 9, 2012. Under fire over a scandal that threatens his career, Bo confidently hit back Friday, admitting lapses in judgment while defending the controversial anti-mafia crackdown that made him and his ex-police chief popular. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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    Posted: 2/19/2012 3:15:48 PM EST
    Protesters from Morocco's pro-democracy February 20 movement shout in front of City Hall Sunday, Feb. 19, 2012, in Casablanca, Morocco. The countrywide anniversary demonstrations to rekindle some of the fire that at its peak in March put 800,000 people from all walks of life on the streets calling for an end to corruption, greater democracy and social justice. Back banner reads 'For the rapid dissolution of the government and parliament with two chambers, the judgment of those who have stolen public money and the release of all political prisoners and prisoners for their right to expression and freedom of worship" and in yellow 'February 20 movement gather'. (AP Photo / Abdeljalil Bounhar)
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    Posted: 2/19/2012 3:15:45 PM EST
    Protesters from Morocco's pro-democracy February 20 movement shout in front of City Hall Sunday, Feb. 19, 2012, in Casablanca, Morocco. The countrywide anniversary demonstrations to rekindle some of the fire that at its peak in March put 800,000 people from all walks of life on the streets calling for an end to corruption, greater democracy and social justice. Back banner reads 'For the rapid dissolution of the government and parliament with two chambers, the judgment of those who have stolen public money and the release of all political prisoners and prisoners for their right to expression and freedom of worship' and in yellow 'February 20 movement gather'. (AP Photo/Abdeljalil Bounhar)
  •  - A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York

    A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York

    Posted: 2/15/2012 4:28:24 PM EST
    A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York February 15, 2012. A few Federal Reserve officials in January believed another round of central bank bond buying would be needed before long to support the U.S. economy, but others withheld judgment to await more data. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
  •  - A trader sits with his hands folded on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York

    A trader sits with his hands folded on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York

    Posted: 2/15/2012 4:25:32 PM EST
    A trader sits with his hands folded on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York February 15, 2012. A few Federal Reserve officials in January believed another round of central bank bond buying would be needed before long to support the U.S. economy, but others withheld judgment to await more data. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
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    Posted: 2/8/2012 4:00:52 PM EST
    Emilio Palacio checks his phone for messages as he arrives at the immigration center in Miami for a hearing Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012. The former Ecuadorian newspaper columnist who faces prison and millions of dollars in fines for criticism of President Rafael Correa is asking for asylum in the U.S., claiming he is the victim of persecution aimed at stifling free expression. Palacio said in an asylum application that a criminal libel judgment against him shows he "is being severely punished in Ecuador for expressing legitimate opinions and subjective interpretations of factual events. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
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    Posted: 2/8/2012 4:00:51 PM EST
    Emilio Palacio arrives at the immigration center in Miami for a hearing Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012. The former Ecuadorian newspaper columnist who faces prison and millions of dollars in fines for criticism of President Rafael Correa is asking for asylum in the U.S., claiming he is the victim of persecution aimed at stifling free expression. Palacio said in an asylum application that a criminal libel judgment against him shows he "is being severely punished in Ecuador for expressing legitimate opinions and subjective interpretations of factual events. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
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    Posted: 2/3/2012 10:30:49 AM EST
    General view of the court showing the judges, rear, the delegation of Germany, front row right, and the delegation of Italy, front row left, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday Feb. 3, 2012, as the International Court of Justice delivered its judgment in a dispute between Germany and Italy over World War II reparations. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 2/3/2012 10:30:49 AM EST
    Italy's agent Paolo Pucci di Benisichi, right, takes a sip of water as Germany's Susanne Wasum-Rainer, director general for legal affairs and legal advisor, left, talks to professor of law Christian Tomuschat of Germany, second left, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday Feb. 3, 2012, prior to the start of the court session where the International Court of Justice delivered its judgment in a dispute between Germany and Italy over World War II reparations. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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    Posted: 2/3/2012 10:30:48 AM EST
    Presiding judge Hisashi Owada of Japan, third from right looking up, reads the verdict of the International Court of Justice in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday Feb. 3, 2012, as it delivered its judgment in a dispute between Germany and Italy over World War II reparations. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)