Judgment Photos on Townhall

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              A police vehicle with terror charged Anders Behring Breivik arrives at  Ila Prison outside Oslo Norway Wednesday Aug. 22, 2012. The Norwegian right-wing extremist who admitted to bomb a

    A police vehicle with terror charged Anders Behring Breivik arrives at Ila Prison outside Oslo Norway Wednesday Aug. 22, 2012. The Norwegian right-wing extremist who admitted to bomb a

    Posted: 8/22/2012 12:33:28 PM EST
    A police vehicle with terror charged Anders Behring Breivik arrives at Ila Prison outside Oslo Norway Wednesday Aug. 22, 2012. The Norwegian right-wing extremist who admitted to bomb and gun attacks that killed 77 people last year will receive his judgment Friday in a court room custom built for his trial. (AP Photo/Ole Berg Rusten, NTB scanpix) NORWAY OUT
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              FILE -This Monday March 17, 2008 file photo shows Paul McCartney, 65, leaving the central London's Royal Courts of Justice, following the announcement of the judgment of his divorce wit

    FILE -This Monday March 17, 2008 file photo shows Paul McCartney, 65, leaving the central London's Royal Courts of Justice, following the announcement of the judgment of his divorce wit

    Posted: 7/24/2012 12:38:39 PM EST
    FILE -This Monday March 17, 2008 file photo shows Paul McCartney, 65, leaving the central London's Royal Courts of Justice, following the announcement of the judgment of his divorce with Heather Mills. On Tuesday, July 24, 2012, British prosecutors announced charges against eight people alleged to have been involved in a phone hacking scheme with more than 600 targets. Some of the prominent alleged victims of the phone hacking are thought to have included, Paul McCartney, Heather Mills, Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt, Jude Law, Sadie Frost, Sienna Miller, Wayne Rooney, Sven-Goran Eriksson, Lord Frederick Windsor, John Prescott, as well as murdered 13-year old school girl who was abducted in 2002 Amanda "Milly" Dowler. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, file)
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              FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2010 file photo, President Barack Obama greets Chief Justice John Roberts before he delivered his State of the Union Address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Break

    FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2010 file photo, President Barack Obama greets Chief Justice John Roberts before he delivered his State of the Union Address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Break

    Posted: 6/29/2012 11:33:34 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2010 file photo, President Barack Obama greets Chief Justice John Roberts before he delivered his State of the Union Address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Breaking with the court's other conservative justices, Roberts announced the judgment that allows the law to go forward with its aim of covering more than 30 million uninsured Americans. Roberts explained at length the court's view of the mandate as a valid exercise of Congress' authority to "lay and collect taxes." The administration estimates that roughly 4 million people will pay the penalty rather than buy insurance. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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              FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2010 file photo, Chief Justice John Roberts is seen during the group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. Breaking with the court's other conserv

    FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2010 file photo, Chief Justice John Roberts is seen during the group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. Breaking with the court's other conserv

    Posted: 6/29/2012 11:33:33 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2010 file photo, Chief Justice John Roberts is seen during the group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. Breaking with the court's other conservative justices, Roberts announced the judgment that allows the law to go forward with its aim of covering more than 30 million uninsured Americans. Roberts explained at length the court's view of the mandate as a valid exercise of Congress' authority to "lay and collect taxes." The administration estimates that roughly 4 million people will pay the penalty rather than buy insurance. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
  •  - Journalists read the court's decision on the judgment of Nabil Karoui, the owner of Tunisian television station Nessma, inside a court in Tunis

    Journalists read the court's decision on the judgment of Nabil Karoui, the owner of Tunisian television station Nessma, inside a court in Tunis

    Posted: 5/3/2012 9:08:59 AM EST
    Journalists read the court's decision on the judgment of Nabil Karoui, the owner of Tunisian television station Nessma, inside a court in Tunis, May 3, 2012. A Tunisian court on Thursday fined Karoui 2,400 dinars ($1,550) for showing a controversial film after a trial that deepened a growing divide between Islamists and secularists. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: CRIME LAW MEDIA CIVIL UNREST RELIGION)
  •  - Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Floettl and BAWAG Chairman Weninger wait in a courtroom for rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Floettl and BAWAG Chairman Weninger wait in a courtroom for rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    Posted: 5/3/2012 6:34:39 AM EST
    Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Wolfgang Floettl, who invested money for BAWAG Bank, and former Chairman of Austrian BAWAG P.S.K. bank Guenther Weninger (L) wait in a a courtroom for a rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna May 3, 2012. Bankers are accused of committing or aiding breach of trust and false accounting by gambling away at least 1.4 billion euros ($2.08 billion) in one of the world's biggest speculative failures. The first instance judgment in July 2008, spoken by Judge Claudia Bandion-Ortner had been cancelled in large parts because of procedural irregularities by the supreme court. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
  •  - Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Floettl waits in a courtroom for rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Floettl waits in a courtroom for rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    Posted: 5/3/2012 6:34:01 AM EST
    Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Wolfgang Floettl, who invested money for BAWAG Bank, waits in a courtroom for a rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna May 3, 2012. Bankers are accused of committing or aiding breach of trust and false accounting by gambling away at least 1.4 billion euros ($2.08 billion) in one of the world's biggest speculative failures. The first instance judgment in July 2008, spoken by Judge Claudia Bandion-Ortner had been cancelled in large parts because of procedural irregularities by the supreme court. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
  •  - Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Floettl waits in a courtroom for rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Floettl waits in a courtroom for rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    Posted: 5/3/2012 6:32:34 AM EST
    Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Wolfgang Floettl, who invested money for BAWAG Bank, waits in a courtroom for a rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna May 3, 2012. Bankers are accused of committing or aiding breach of trust and false accounting by gambling away at least 1.4 billion euros ($2.08 billion) in one of the world's biggest speculative failures. The first instance judgment in July 2008, spoken by Judge Claudia Bandion-Ortner had been cancelled in large parts because of procedural irregularities by the supreme court. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
  •  - Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Floettl arrives at courtroom for rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Floettl arrives at courtroom for rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    Posted: 5/2/2012 4:56:08 AM EST
    Defendant Austrian hedge fund manager Wolfgang Floettl, who invested money for BAWAG Bank, arrives at a courtroom for a rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna May 2, 2012. Bankers, led by former Chief Executive of Austrian BAWAG P.S.K. bank Helmut Elsner are accused of committing or aiding breach of trust and false accounting, by gambling away at least 1.4 billion euros ($2.08 billion) in one of the world's biggest speculative failures. The first instance judgment in July 2008, spoken by Judge Claudia Bandion-Ortner had been cancelled in large parts because of procedural irregularities by the supreme court. REUTERS/Lisi Niesner (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
  •  - A sign marks the seat of former BAWAG P.S.K. bank CEO Elsner in a courtroom before beginning of rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    A sign marks the seat of former BAWAG P.S.K. bank CEO Elsner in a courtroom before beginning of rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    Posted: 5/2/2012 4:49:58 AM EST
    A sign marks the seat of former BAWAG P.S.K. bank CEO Helmut Elsner in a courtroom before the beginning of a rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna May 2, 2012. Elsner who did not appear on Tuesday because of health problems, is accused of committing or aiding breach of trust and false accounting, by gambling away at least 1.4 billion euros ($2.08 billion) in one of the world's biggest speculative failures. The first instance judgment in July 2008, spoken by Judge Claudia Bandion-Ortner had been cancelled in large parts because of procedural irregularities by the supreme court. REUTERS/Lisi Niesner (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
  •  - A sign marks the seat of former BAWAG P.S.K. bank CEO Elsner in a courtroom before beginning of rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    A sign marks the seat of former BAWAG P.S.K. bank CEO Elsner in a courtroom before beginning of rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna

    Posted: 5/2/2012 4:49:29 AM EST
    A sign marks the seat of former BAWAG P.S.K. bank CEO Helmut Elsner in a courtroom before the beginning of a rerun of BAWAG trial in Vienna May 2, 2012. Elsner who did not appear on Tuesday because of health problems, is accused of committing or aiding breach of trust and false accounting, by gambling away at least 1.4 billion euros ($2.08 billion) in one of the world's biggest speculative failures. The first instance judgment in July 2008, spoken by Judge Claudia Bandion-Ortner had been cancelled in large parts because of procedural irregularities by the supreme court. REUTERS/Lisi Niesner (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS CRIME LAW)
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    Posted: 4/27/2012 4:00:48 AM EST
    FILE In this Sept. 1, 1999 file photo, a Sierra Leonean whose two hands were hacked off by terrorist rebels helps another place a sling on his functionless hands, which were similarly hacked off at the wrists, but later sewn back for cosmetic reasons only, at the Camp for War Wounded and Amputees, in Freetown, Sierra Leone. On Thursday, April 26, 2012, judges at an international war crimes court will pass judgment on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor, who is accused of sponsoring rebels responsible for untold atrocities during Sierra Leone's brutal civil war in return for so-called blood diamonds. The historic verdicts at the Special Court for Sierra Leone will mark the first time an international tribunal has reached judgment in the trial of a former head of state since Nuremberg.(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
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    Posted: 4/27/2012 4:00:48 AM EST
    FILE In this Oct. 3, 1998 file photo, Yanor Kanu sits at her hospital window in the Laka Town Rehabilitation Center near Freetown, Sierra Leone, as she recovers from surgery on her amputated arms. On Thursday, April 26, 2012, judges at an international war crimes court will pass judgment on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor, who is accused of sponsoring rebels responsible for untold atrocities during Sierra Leone's brutal civil war in return for so-called blood diamonds. The historic verdicts at the Special Court for Sierra Leone will mark the first time an international tribunal has reached judgment in the trial of a former head of state since Nuremberg.(AP Photo/Christine Nesbitt, File)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 5:50:53 PM EST
    Jabati Mambu, whose right hand was hacked off by rebel fighters more than 13 years ago, stands outside the United Nations compound where he works in Freetown, Sierra Leone Tuesday, April 24, 2012. This week, Mambu says his wounds may finally be healed. On Thursday, judges at an international war crimes court will pass judgment on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor, who is accused of sponsoring rebels responsible for untold atrocities during Sierra Leone's brutal civil war in return for so-called blood diamonds.(AP Photo/Felicity Thompson)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 5:50:53 PM EST
    FILE In this June 10, 1997 photo, RUF ( Revolutionary United Front ) soldiers ride in a pick up truck at their base in the outskirts of Freetown. On Thursday, April 26, 2012, judges at an international war crimes court will pass judgment on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor, who is accused of sponsoring rebels responsible for untold atrocities during Sierra Leone's brutal civil war in return for so-called blood diamonds. The historic verdicts at the Special Court for Sierra Leone will mark the first time an international tribunal has reached judgment in the trial of a former head of state since Nuremberg.(AP Photo/Enric Marti, File)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 5:50:53 PM EST
    FILE In this June 11, 1997 photo, a Revolutionary United Front (RUF) rebel soldier lies dead on the side of the road after being killed in a clash with Nigerian ECOMOG soldiers next to the Nigerian base at the Lungi airport north of Freetown. On Thursday, April 26, 2012, judges at an international war crimes court will pass judgment on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor, who is accused of sponsoring rebels responsible for untold atrocities during Sierra Leone's brutal civil war in return for so-called blood diamonds. The historic verdicts at the Special Court for Sierra Leone will mark the first time an international tribunal has reached judgment in the trial of a former head of state since Nuremberg.(AP Photo/Enric Marti, FILE)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 5:50:53 PM EST
    FILE In this May 18, 2000 file photo, 14-year-old Maria Tukamara, mother of 5-month-old son Abdul, shows her false arms in the Amputee camp run by the French aid agency 'Medicins Sans Frontiers' in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Maria lost her hands after the Revolutionary United Front (RUF) invaded her village on April 30, 1999. On Thursday, April 26, 2012, judges at an international war crimes court will pass judgment on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor, who is accused of sponsoring rebels responsible for untold atrocities during Sierra Leone's brutal civil war in return for so-called blood diamonds. The historic verdicts at the Special Court for Sierra Leone will mark the first time an international tribunal has reached judgment in the trial of a former head of state since Nuremberg.(AP Photo/Adam Butler, FILE).
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 5:50:53 PM EST
    FILE In this May 11, 2000 file photo, a Sierra Leonean Army soldier runs to get onto a truck filled with soldiers en route to the battlefront against RUF rebels, east of the village of Waterloo, Sierra Leone. On Thursday, April 26, 2012, judges at an international war crimes court will pass judgment on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor, who is accused of sponsoring rebels responsible for untold atrocities during Sierra Leone's brutal civil war in return for so-called blood diamonds. The historic verdicts at the Special Court for Sierra Leone will mark the first time an international tribunal has reached judgment in the trial of a former head of state since Nuremberg.(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 5:50:53 PM EST
    FILE In this May 24, 2000 file photo, diamond prospectors sift through the earth in the Corbert mine in Waiima, Sierra Leone, 40 kilometers (25 miles) east of Bo in central Sierra Leone. On Thursday, April 26, 2012, judges at an international war crimes court will pass judgment on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor, who is accused of sponsoring rebels responsible for untold atrocities during Sierra Leone's brutal civil war in return for so-called blood diamonds. The historic verdicts at the Special Court for Sierra Leone will mark the first time an international tribunal has reached judgment in the trial of a former head of state since Nuremberg. (AP Photo/Adam Butler, File)
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    Posted: 4/26/2012 3:00:46 AM EST
    FILE -In this April 3, 2006 file photo former Liberian President Charles Taylor makes his first appearance at the Special Court in Freetown. On Thursday April 26, 2012, judges at an international war crimes court will pass judgment on warlord-turned-Liberian president Charles Taylor, who is accused of sponsoring rebels responsible for untold atrocities during Sierra Leone's brutal civil war in return for so-called blood diamonds. The historic verdicts at the Special Court for Sierra Leone will mark the first time an international tribunal has reached judgment in the trial of a former head of state since judges in Nuremberg convicted Karl Doenitz, a naval officer who briefly led Germany after Adolf Hitler's suicide.(AP Photo/George Osodi, Pool, File)