Judgment Photos on Townhall

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              Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, awaits his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands

    Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, awaits his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands

    Posted: 2/28/2013 10:48:22 AM EST
    Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, awaits his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday Feb. 28, 2013. Prosecutors accused Perisic of providing crucial military aid to rebel Serb forces responsible for the atrocities including the Srebrenica massacre and siege of Sarajevo. Perisic's 2011 conviction and 27-year sentence marked the first time the U.N. court had found a civilian or military officer from Serbia guilty of war crimes in Bosnia. (AP Photo/Koen van Weel, Pool)
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              Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, back row right, awaits his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Ha

    Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, back row right, awaits his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Ha

    Posted: 2/28/2013 10:48:22 AM EST
    Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, back row right, awaits his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday Feb. 28, 2013. Prosecutors accused Perisic of providing crucial military aid to rebel Serb forces responsible for the atrocities including the Srebrenica massacre and siege of Sarajevo. Perisic's 2011 conviction and 27-year sentence marked the first time the U.N. court had found a civilian or military officer from Serbia guilty of war crimes in Bosnia. (AP Photo/Koen van Weel, Pool)
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              Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, right, talks to his lawyer prior to his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribu

    Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, right, talks to his lawyer prior to his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribu

    Posted: 2/28/2013 10:48:22 AM EST
    Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, right, talks to his lawyer prior to his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday Feb. 28, 2013. Prosecutors accused Perisic of providing crucial military aid to rebel Serb forces responsible for the atrocities including the Srebrenica massacre and siege of Sarajevo. Perisic's 2011 conviction and 27-year sentence marked the first time the U.N. court had found a civilian or military officer from Serbia guilty of war crimes in Bosnia. (AP Photo/Koen van Weel, Pool)
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              Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, enters the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal for his appeal judgment in The Hague, Netherland

    Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, enters the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal for his appeal judgment in The Hague, Netherland

    Posted: 2/28/2013 10:48:22 AM EST
    Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, enters the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal for his appeal judgment in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday Feb. 28, 2013. Prosecutors accused Perisic of providing crucial military aid to rebel Serb forces responsible for the atrocities including the Srebrenica massacre and siege of Sarajevo. Perisic's 2011 conviction and 27-year sentence marked the first time the U.N. court had found a civilian or military officer from Serbia guilty of war crimes in Bosnia. (AP Photo/Koen van Weel, Pool)
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              Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, right, talks to his lawyer prior to his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribu

    Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, right, talks to his lawyer prior to his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribu

    Posted: 2/28/2013 10:48:22 AM EST
    Gen. Momcilo Perisic, the former chief of staff of the Yugoslav national army, right, talks to his lawyer prior to his appeal judgment in the court room of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday Feb. 28, 2013. Prosecutors accused Perisic of providing crucial military aid to rebel Serb forces responsible for the atrocities including the Srebrenica massacre and siege of Sarajevo. Perisic's 2011 conviction and 27-year sentence marked the first time the U.N. court had found a civilian or military officer from Serbia guilty of war crimes in Bosnia. (AP Photo/Koen van Weel, Pool)
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              FILE - In this June 15, 2010 file photo, from left, attorneys Ted Olson and David Boies speak in San Francisco. Judgment day is approaching in an epic battle between Argentina and New Y

    FILE - In this June 15, 2010 file photo, from left, attorneys Ted Olson and David Boies speak in San Francisco. Judgment day is approaching in an epic battle between Argentina and New Y

    Posted: 2/27/2013 4:48:42 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 15, 2010 file photo, from left, attorneys Ted Olson and David Boies speak in San Francisco. Judgment day is approaching in an epic battle between Argentina and New York billionaire Paul Singer, who has sent lawyers around the globe trying to force the South American country to pay its defaulted debts. Three U.S. appellate judges will hear oral arguments in New York on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2013, in the case, NML Capital Ltd. v. Argentina. The case has shaken bond markets, worried bankers, lawyers and diplomats, captivated financial analysts and generated enough “friend of the court” briefs to kill a small forest. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
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              FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2013 file photo, Argentina's naval training tall ship ARA Libertad arrives to port as planes fly overhead during a ceremony in Mar del Plata, Argentina Ghana cour

    FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2013 file photo, Argentina's naval training tall ship ARA Libertad arrives to port as planes fly overhead during a ceremony in Mar del Plata, Argentina Ghana cour

    Posted: 2/27/2013 4:48:42 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2013 file photo, Argentina's naval training tall ship ARA Libertad arrives to port as planes fly overhead during a ceremony in Mar del Plata, Argentina Ghana courts ordered the ship held in October on a claim by Cayman Islands-based hedge fund NML Capital Ltd. But the U.N.'s International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea ordered the ship's release after Argentina argued that warships are immune from seizure. Judgment day is approaching in an epic battle between Argentina and New York billionaire Paul Singer, who has sent lawyers around the globe trying to force the South American country to pay its defaulted debts. Three U.S. appellate judges will hear oral arguments in New York on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2013, in the case, NML Capital Ltd. v. Argentina. The case has shaken bond markets, worried bankers, lawyers and diplomats, captivated financial analysts and generated enough “friend of the court” briefs to kill a small forest. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko, File)
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              FILE - In this July 25, 2012 photo, Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez unveils an archetype of the new 100 Argentine pesos bill bearing the profile of former late first lady Maria

    FILE - In this July 25, 2012 photo, Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez unveils an archetype of the new 100 Argentine pesos bill bearing the profile of former late first lady Maria

    Posted: 2/27/2013 4:48:42 AM EST
    FILE - In this July 25, 2012 photo, Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez unveils an archetype of the new 100 Argentine pesos bill bearing the profile of former late first lady Maria Eva Duarte de Peron, better known as "Evita," at the government palace in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Judgment day is approaching in an epic battle between Argentina and New York billionaire Paul Singer, who has sent lawyers around the globe trying to force the South American country to pay its defaulted debts. Three U.S. appellate judges will hear oral arguments in New York on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2013, in the case, NML Capital Ltd. v. Argentina. The case has shaken bond markets, worried bankers, lawyers and diplomats, captivated financial analysts and generated enough “friend of the court” briefs to kill a small forest. (AP Photo/Alberto Raggio, DyN, File)
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              FILE- In this file photo taken March 7, 2007, David Jin, an investor for the Skywalk project, is all smiles at the rollout for the Skywalk on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Grand Ca

    FILE- In this file photo taken March 7, 2007, David Jin, an investor for the Skywalk project, is all smiles at the rollout for the Skywalk on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Grand Ca

    Posted: 2/11/2013 10:43:21 PM EST
    FILE- In this file photo taken March 7, 2007, David Jin, an investor for the Skywalk project, is all smiles at the rollout for the Skywalk on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Grand Canyon West, Ariz. A federal court has upheld a $28 million judgment against a business arm of the northern Arizona tribe that owns the Grand Canyon Skywalk. The American Arbitration Association had awarded Las Vegas businessman David Jin the money in August. His attorneys went to federal court to enforce it. Jin invested $30 million to build the Skywalk, a glass bridge that gives visitors a view of the Colorado River from the Hualapai reservation. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
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              FILE - In this file photo taken Tuesday, March 20, 2007, people walk on the Skywalk during the First Walk event at the Grand Canyon on the Hualapai Indian Reservation at Grand Canyon We

    FILE - In this file photo taken Tuesday, March 20, 2007, people walk on the Skywalk during the First Walk event at the Grand Canyon on the Hualapai Indian Reservation at Grand Canyon We

    Posted: 2/11/2013 10:43:21 PM EST
    FILE - In this file photo taken Tuesday, March 20, 2007, people walk on the Skywalk during the First Walk event at the Grand Canyon on the Hualapai Indian Reservation at Grand Canyon West, Ariz. The Skywalk opened to the general public on March 28, 2007. A federal court has upheld a $28 million judgment against a business arm of the northern Arizona tribe that owns the Grand Canyon Skywalk. The American Arbitration Association had awarded Las Vegas businessman David Jin the money in August. His attorneys went to federal court to enforce it. Jin invested $30 million to build the Skywalk, a glass bridge that gives visitors a view of the Colorado River from the Hualapai reservation. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
  •  - Opposition leader Sergei Udaltsov stands to listen to a judgment with his legal team in a court hearing in Moscow

    Opposition leader Sergei Udaltsov stands to listen to a judgment with his legal team in a court hearing in Moscow

    Posted: 2/9/2013 11:04:11 AM EST
    Opposition leader Sergei Udaltsov (2nd L) stands to listen to a judgment with his legal team in a court hearing in Moscow February 9, 2013. Russia's top investigative agency said on Friday it was seeking to put Udaltsov under house arrest charged with plotting mass disorder in protests against President Vladimir Putin. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov
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              FILE- In this April 11, 2012 file photo, former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor speaks during a forum to celebrate the 30th anniversary of O’Connor’s appointment to the Suprem

    FILE- In this April 11, 2012 file photo, former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor speaks during a forum to celebrate the 30th anniversary of O’Connor’s appointment to the Suprem

    Posted: 1/29/2013 8:03:21 PM EST
    FILE- In this April 11, 2012 file photo, former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor speaks during a forum to celebrate the 30th anniversary of O’Connor’s appointment to the Supreme Court, at the Newseum in Washington. O'Connor on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013 warned against a rush to judgment in a New York gun ownership dispute, citing the recent killings of 20 Connecticut schoolchildren and six educators. (AP Photo Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
  •  - Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas

    Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas

    Posted: 1/9/2013 3:17:29 PM EST
    Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas January 9, 2013. The head of Venezuela's Supreme Court said on Wednesday the postponement of Hugo Chavez's planned December 10 inauguration for a new presidential term was constitutionally legitimate. Luisa Morales, the court's president, gave the judgment at a news conference, saying no new swearing-in was necessary and Chavez remained Venezuela's president, with Nicolas Maduro also continuing in his role as vice-president. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
  •  - Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas

    Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas

    Posted: 1/9/2013 3:17:29 PM EST
    Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas January 9, 2013. The head of Venezuela's Supreme Court said on Wednesday the postponement of Hugo Chavez's planned December 10 inauguration for a new presidential term was constitutionally legitimate. Luisa Morales, the court's president, gave the judgment at a news conference, saying no new swearing-in was necessary and Chavez remained Venezuela's president, with Nicolas Maduro also continuing in his role as vice-president. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
  •  - Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas

    Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas

    Posted: 1/9/2013 3:17:29 PM EST
    Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas January 9, 2013. The head of Venezuela's Supreme Court said on Wednesday the postponement of Hugo Chavez's planned December 10 inauguration for a new presidential term was constitutionally legitimate. Luisa Morales, the court's president, gave the judgment at a news conference, saying no new swearing-in was necessary and Chavez remained Venezuela's president, with Nicolas Maduro also continuing in his role as vice-president. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
  •  - Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas

    Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas

    Posted: 1/9/2013 3:17:29 PM EST
    Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas January 9, 2013. The head of Venezuela's Supreme Court said on Wednesday the postponement of Hugo Chavez's planned December 10 inauguration for a new presidential term was constitutionally legitimate. Luisa Morales, the court's president, gave the judgment at a news conference, saying no new swearing-in was necessary and Chavez remained Venezuela's president, with Nicolas Maduro also continuing in his role as vice-president. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
  •  - Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas

    Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas

    Posted: 1/9/2013 2:29:57 PM EST
    Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas January 9, 2013. The head of Venezuela's Supreme Court said on Wednesday the postponement of Hugo Chavez's planned December 10 inauguration for a new presidential term was constitutionally legitimate. Luisa Morales, the court's president, gave the judgment at a news conference, saying no new swearing-in was necessary and Chavez remained Venezuela's president, with Nicolas Maduro also continuing in his role as vice-president. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
  •  - Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas

    Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas

    Posted: 1/9/2013 2:29:57 PM EST
    Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas January 9, 2013. The head of Venezuela's Supreme Court said on Wednesday the postponement of Hugo Chavez's planned December 10 inauguration for a new presidential term was constitutionally legitimate. Luisa Morales, the court's president, gave the judgment at a news conference, saying no new swearing-in was necessary and Chavez remained Venezuela's president, with Nicolas Maduro also continuing in his role as vice-president. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
  •  - Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas

    Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas

    Posted: 1/9/2013 2:29:20 PM EST
    Luisa Estella Morales, President of the Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ), attends a news conference in Caracas January 9, 2013. The head of Venezuela's Supreme Court said on Wednesday the postponement of Hugo Chavez's planned December 10 inauguration for a new presidential term was constitutionally legitimate. Luisa Morales, the court's president, gave the judgment at a news conference, saying no new swearing-in was necessary and Chavez remained Venezuela's president, with Nicolas Maduro also continuing in his role as vice-president. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
  •  - Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas

    Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas

    Posted: 1/9/2013 2:29:20 PM EST
    Venezuelan Supreme Court of Justice (TSJ) magistrates attend a news conference in Caracas January 9, 2013. The head of Venezuela's Supreme Court said on Wednesday the postponement of Hugo Chavez's planned December 10 inauguration for a new presidential term was constitutionally legitimate. Luisa Morales, the court's president, gave the judgment at a news conference, saying no new swearing-in was necessary and Chavez remained Venezuela's president, with Nicolas Maduro also continuing in his role as vice-president. REUTERS/Jorge Silva


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