Jim Crow Photos on Townhall

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              In this photograph of a sample 2010 US Census form, obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options

    In this photograph of a sample 2010 US Census form, obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options

    Posted: 2/25/2013 3:43:34 PM EST
    In this photograph of a sample 2010 US Census form, obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options for White: Black, African Am., or Negro. After more than a century, the Census Bureau is dropping use of the word "Negro" to describe black Americans in its surveys. Instead of the term popularized during the Jim Crow era of racial segregation, census forms will use the more modern-day labels, “black” or “African-American”. (AP Photo)
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              In this photograph of a sample 2010 US Census form, obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options

    In this photograph of a sample 2010 US Census form, obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options

    Posted: 2/25/2013 3:43:34 PM EST
    In this photograph of a sample 2010 US Census form, obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options for White: Black, African Am., or Negro. After more than a century, the Census Bureau is dropping use of the word "Negro" to describe black Americans in its surveys. Instead of the term popularized during the Jim Crow era of racial segregation, census forms will use the more modern-day labels, “black” or “African-American”. (AP Photo)
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              This handout image obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options for White: Black, African Am., o

    This handout image obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options for White: Black, African Am., o

    Posted: 2/25/2013 1:03:30 PM EST
    This handout image obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options for White: Black, African Am., or Negro. After more than a century, the Census Bureau is dropping use of the word "Negro" to describe black Americans in its surveys. Instead of the term popularized during the Jim Crow era of racial segregation, census forms will use the more modern-day labels, “black” or “African-American”. (AP Photo)
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              FILE - In this April 14, 1964 black-and-white file photo, a man holds a Confederate flag at right, as demonstrators, including one carrying a sign saying: "More than 300,000 Negroes are

    FILE - In this April 14, 1964 black-and-white file photo, a man holds a Confederate flag at right, as demonstrators, including one carrying a sign saying: "More than 300,000 Negroes are

    Posted: 2/25/2013 1:03:30 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 14, 1964 black-and-white file photo, a man holds a Confederate flag at right, as demonstrators, including one carrying a sign saying: "More than 300,000 Negroes are Denied Vote in Ala", demonstrate in front of an Indianapolis hotel where then-Alabama Governor George Wallace was staying. After more than a century, the Census Bureau is dropping use of the word "Negro" to describe black Americans in its surveys. Instead of the term popularized during the Jim Crow era of racial segregation, census forms will use the more modern-day labels, “black” or “African-American”. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty, File)
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              This handout image obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options for White: Black, African Am., o

    This handout image obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options for White: Black, African Am., o

    Posted: 2/25/2013 12:58:35 PM EST
    This handout image obtained by The Associated Press shows question 9: "What is Person 1's race", on the first page of the 2010 Census form, with options for White: Black, African Am., or Negro. After more than a century, the Census Bureau is dropping use of the word "Negro" to describe black Americans in its surveys. Instead of the term popularized during the Jim Crow era of racial segregation, census forms will use the more modern-day labels, “black” or “African-American”. (AP Photo)
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    Posted: 4/19/2012 8:05:50 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, a display of colored items is seen at the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia in Big Rapids, Mich. The museum says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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    Posted: 4/19/2012 8:05:50 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, visitors look over displays at the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia in Big Rapids, Mich. The museum says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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    Posted: 4/19/2012 8:05:50 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, David Pilgrim, the founder and curator who started building the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia, stands in the museum's entrance in Big Rapids, Mich. The museum says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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    Posted: 4/19/2012 8:05:50 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, David Pilgrim, the founder and curator who started building the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia, right, talks to visitors at the museum in Big Rapids, Mich. The museum says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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    Posted: 4/19/2012 8:05:49 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, the university library at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Mich., is seen. The library houses the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia, which says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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    Posted: 4/19/2012 8:05:49 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, David Pilgrim, the founder and curator who started building the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia, adjusts a display at the museum in Big Rapids, Mich. The museum says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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    Posted: 4/19/2012 4:05:48 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, a display of colored items is seen at the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia in Big Rapids, Mich. The museum says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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    Posted: 4/19/2012 4:05:48 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, visitors look over displays at the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia in Big Rapids, Mich. The museum says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/19/2012 4:05:48 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, David Pilgrim, the founder and curator who started building the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia, stands in the museum's entrance in Big Rapids, Mich. The museum says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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    Posted: 4/19/2012 4:05:48 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, David Pilgrim, the founder and curator who started building the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia, right, talks to visitors at the museum in Big Rapids, Mich. The museum says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
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    Posted: 4/19/2012 4:05:48 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, the university library at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Mich., is seen. The library houses the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia, which says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/19/2012 4:05:48 AM EST
    In a March 14, 2012 photo, David Pilgrim, the founder and curator who started building the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia, adjusts a display at the museum in Big Rapids, Mich. The museum says it has amassed the nation?s largest public collection of artifacts spanning the segregation era, from Reconstruction until the civil rights movement, and beyond. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)