Investment Photos on Townhall

  •  - To match Exclusive CUBA-FUND/

    To match Exclusive CUBA-FUND/

    Posted: 5/28/2013 6:56:45 PM EST
    Havana offices of British investment firm Coral Capital Group are closed and cordoned off with Cuban police crime scene tape October 14, 2011. REUTERS/Enrique De La Osa
  •  - To match Exclusive CUBA-FUND/

    To match Exclusive CUBA-FUND/

    Posted: 5/28/2013 6:56:45 PM EST
    Havana offices of British investment firm Coral Capital Group are closed and cordoned off with Cuban police crime scene tape October 14, 2011. REUTERS/Enrique De La Osa
  •  - To match Exclusive CUBA-FUND/

    To match Exclusive CUBA-FUND/

    Posted: 5/28/2013 6:39:37 PM EST
    Havana offices of British investment firm Coral Capital Group are closed and cordoned off with Cuban police crime scene tape October 14, 2011. REUTERS/Enrique De La Osa
  •  - To match Exclusive CUBA-FUND/

    To match Exclusive CUBA-FUND/

    Posted: 5/28/2013 6:39:37 PM EST
    Havana offices of British investment firm Coral Capital Group are closed and cordoned off with Cuban police crime scene tape October 14, 2011. REUTERS/Enrique De La Osa
  •  - File photo of trucks lined up at Rodovia Conego Domenico Rangoni in Guaruja

    File photo of trucks lined up at Rodovia Conego Domenico Rangoni in Guaruja

    Posted: 5/28/2013 11:45:43 AM EST
    Trucks line up at Rodovia Conego Domenico Rangoni in Guaruja in this March 27, 2013 file photo. Investment in Brazil probably grew at the fastest pace in three years in the first quarter, official data should show on Wednesday. But as much as two thirds of the rise may have come from the construction of heavy trucks - hardly the steady capital spending that Brazil so badly needs. Brazil's meager growth since 2011 is due in large part to that dismal investment rate, which President Dilma Rousseff is struggling to boost toward her goal of 25 percent of GDP. While consumer spending has kept the economy plodding along, a lack of capital spending and a host of transportation bottlenecks makes it hard to satisfy demand without stoking inflation. Last year Rousseff announced more than $100 billion in private road, rail and port concessions - a clear shift in strategy from the cumbersome state programs that disappointed in recent years. Picture taken March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files
  •  - File photo of trucks loaded with soybean lined up at Santos port in Santos

    File photo of trucks loaded with soybean lined up at Santos port in Santos

    Posted: 5/28/2013 11:45:43 AM EST
    Trucks loaded with soybean line up at Santos port in Santos in this March 27, 2013 file photo. Investment in Brazil probably grew at the fastest pace in three years in the first quarter, official data should show on Wednesday. But as much as two thirds of the rise may have come from the construction of heavy trucks - hardly the steady capital spending that Brazil so badly needs. Brazil's meager growth since 2011 is due in large part to that dismal investment rate, which President Dilma Rousseff is struggling to boost toward her goal of 25 percent of GDP. While consumer spending has kept the economy plodding along, a lack of capital spending and a host of transportation bottlenecks makes it hard to satisfy demand without stoking inflation. Last year Rousseff announced more than $100 billion in private road, rail and port concessions - a clear shift in strategy from the cumbersome state programs that disappointed in recent years. Picture taken March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files
  •  - File photo of trucks lined up at Rodovia Conego Domenico Rangoni in Guaruja

    File photo of trucks lined up at Rodovia Conego Domenico Rangoni in Guaruja

    Posted: 5/28/2013 11:45:43 AM EST
    Trucks line up at Rodovia Conego Domenico Rangoni in Guaruja in this March 27, 2013 file photo. Investment in Brazil probably grew at the fastest pace in three years in the first quarter, official data should show on Wednesday. But as much as two thirds of the rise may have come from the construction of heavy trucks - hardly the steady capital spending that Brazil so badly needs. Brazil's meager growth since 2011 is due in large part to that dismal investment rate, which President Dilma Rousseff is struggling to boost toward her goal of 25 percent of GDP. While consumer spending has kept the economy plodding along, a lack of capital spending and a host of transportation bottlenecks makes it hard to satisfy demand without stoking inflation. Last year Rousseff announced more than $100 billion in private road, rail and port concessions - a clear shift in strategy from the cumbersome state programs that disappointed in recent years. Picture taken March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files
  •  - File photo of trucks loaded with soybean lined up at Santos port in Santos

    File photo of trucks loaded with soybean lined up at Santos port in Santos

    Posted: 5/28/2013 11:45:43 AM EST
    Trucks loaded with soybean line up at Santos port in Santos in this March 27, 2013 file photo. Investment in Brazil probably grew at the fastest pace in three years in the first quarter, official data should show on Wednesday. But as much as two thirds of the rise may have come from the construction of heavy trucks - hardly the steady capital spending that Brazil so badly needs. Brazil's meager growth since 2011 is due in large part to that dismal investment rate, which President Dilma Rousseff is struggling to boost toward her goal of 25 percent of GDP. While consumer spending has kept the economy plodding along, a lack of capital spending and a host of transportation bottlenecks makes it hard to satisfy demand without stoking inflation. Last year Rousseff announced more than $100 billion in private road, rail and port concessions - a clear shift in strategy from the cumbersome state programs that disappointed in recent years. Picture taken March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files
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              An Egyptian traditional horse cart owner waits for clients in Cairo, Egypt, May 27, 2013.  The 2011 uprising that toppled Egypt's longtime autocratic ruler, Hosni Mubarak, dealt a blow

    An Egyptian traditional horse cart owner waits for clients in Cairo, Egypt, May 27, 2013. The 2011 uprising that toppled Egypt's longtime autocratic ruler, Hosni Mubarak, dealt a blow

    Posted: 5/28/2013 2:28:39 AM EST
    An Egyptian traditional horse cart owner waits for clients in Cairo, Egypt, May 27, 2013. The 2011 uprising that toppled Egypt's longtime autocratic ruler, Hosni Mubarak, dealt a blow to foreign investment and tourism, a main revenue source. Neither has recovered, with investors and tourists still scared away by unrest and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
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              An Egyptian traditional horse cart owner waits for clients in Cairo, Egypt, May 27, 2013.  The 2011 uprising that toppled Egypt's longtime autocratic ruler, Hosni Mubarak, dealt a blow

    An Egyptian traditional horse cart owner waits for clients in Cairo, Egypt, May 27, 2013. The 2011 uprising that toppled Egypt's longtime autocratic ruler, Hosni Mubarak, dealt a blow

    Posted: 5/28/2013 2:28:39 AM EST
    An Egyptian traditional horse cart owner waits for clients in Cairo, Egypt, May 27, 2013. The 2011 uprising that toppled Egypt's longtime autocratic ruler, Hosni Mubarak, dealt a blow to foreign investment and tourism, a main revenue source. Neither has recovered, with investors and tourists still scared away by unrest and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
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              FILE - This April 24, 2013 file photo shows Zachary Levi  at the world premiere of "Iron Man 3" held at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles. Producers said Monday that Zachary Levi an

    FILE - This April 24, 2013 file photo shows Zachary Levi at the world premiere of "Iron Man 3" held at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles. Producers said Monday that Zachary Levi an

    Posted: 5/20/2013 11:32:51 AM EST
    FILE - This April 24, 2013 file photo shows Zachary Levi at the world premiere of "Iron Man 3" held at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles. Producers said Monday that Zachary Levi and Krysta Rodriguez will headline the new romantic musical comedy “First Date” by "Gossip Girl" writer Austin Winsberg. "First Date" centers on a successful young investment banker who meets a serial-dater at a local bistro. The show will be seen at The Longacre Theatre beginning July 9. (Photo by Eric Carbonneau/Invision/AP, file)
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              FILE - This April 24, 2013 file photo shows Zachary Levi  at the world premiere of "Iron Man 3" held at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles. Producers said Monday that Zachary Levi an

    FILE - This April 24, 2013 file photo shows Zachary Levi at the world premiere of "Iron Man 3" held at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles. Producers said Monday that Zachary Levi an

    Posted: 5/20/2013 11:32:51 AM EST
    FILE - This April 24, 2013 file photo shows Zachary Levi at the world premiere of "Iron Man 3" held at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles. Producers said Monday that Zachary Levi and Krysta Rodriguez will headline the new romantic musical comedy “First Date” by "Gossip Girl" writer Austin Winsberg. "First Date" centers on a successful young investment banker who meets a serial-dater at a local bistro. The show will be seen at The Longacre Theatre beginning July 9. (Photo by Eric Carbonneau/Invision/AP, file)
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              FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011 file photo, then Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, left, accompanied by Interros Investment Company President Vladimir Potanin visits the Roza Khut

    FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011 file photo, then Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, left, accompanied by Interros Investment Company President Vladimir Potanin visits the Roza Khut

    Posted: 5/20/2013 2:40:57 AM EST
    FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011 file photo, then Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, left, accompanied by Interros Investment Company President Vladimir Potanin visits the Roza Khutorski resort that is under construction for the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, near the Black Sea resort of Sochi, southern Russia. Metals tycoon Vladimir Potanin, whose fortune is an estimated US dlrs 14.3 billion, started building the Roza Khutor ski resort before Sochi was picked to hold the Olympics. Infrastructure required by the International Olympic Committee costing US dlrs 500 million boosted his total bill to US dlrs 2.5 billion. (AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel, File)
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              FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011 file photo, then Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, left, accompanied by Interros Investment Company President Vladimir Potanin visits the Roza Khut

    FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011 file photo, then Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, left, accompanied by Interros Investment Company President Vladimir Potanin visits the Roza Khut

    Posted: 5/20/2013 2:40:57 AM EST
    FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011 file photo, then Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, left, accompanied by Interros Investment Company President Vladimir Potanin visits the Roza Khutorski resort that is under construction for the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, near the Black Sea resort of Sochi, southern Russia. Metals tycoon Vladimir Potanin, whose fortune is an estimated US dlrs 14.3 billion, started building the Roza Khutor ski resort before Sochi was picked to hold the Olympics. Infrastructure required by the International Olympic Committee costing US dlrs 500 million boosted his total bill to US dlrs 2.5 billion. (AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel, File)
  •  - Paraguay's central bank president Jorge Corvalan speaks during an interview for the Reuters Latin America Investment Summit in Asuncion

    Paraguay's central bank president Jorge Corvalan speaks during an interview for the Reuters Latin America Investment Summit in Asuncion

    Posted: 5/19/2013 10:31:43 AM EST
    Paraguay's central bank president Jorge Corvalan speaks during an interview for the Reuters Latin America Investment Summit in Asuncion May 30, 2012. REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
  •  - Paraguay's central bank president Jorge Corvalan speaks during an interview for the Reuters Latin America Investment Summit in Asuncion

    Paraguay's central bank president Jorge Corvalan speaks during an interview for the Reuters Latin America Investment Summit in Asuncion

    Posted: 5/19/2013 10:31:43 AM EST
    Paraguay's central bank president Jorge Corvalan speaks during an interview for the Reuters Latin America Investment Summit in Asuncion May 30, 2012. REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
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              FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're A

    FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're A

    Posted: 5/18/2013 10:43:19 AM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're American and want to do business in Myanmar, there's a list of people and companies that by law you have to steer clear of, including Tay Zay. The Obama administration has said it wants U.S. companies to set a "gold standard" for investment and foster a fairer, more transparent way of doing business in Myanmar. (AP Photo/File)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're A

    FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're A

    Posted: 5/18/2013 10:43:19 AM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're American and want to do business in Myanmar, there's a list of people and companies that by law you have to steer clear of, including Tay Zay. The Obama administration has said it wants U.S. companies to set a "gold standard" for investment and foster a fairer, more transparent way of doing business in Myanmar. (AP Photo/File)
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              FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're A

    FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're A

    Posted: 5/18/2013 9:24:32 AM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're American and want to do business in Myanmar, there's a list of people and companies that by law you have to steer clear of, including Tay Zay. The Obama administration has said it wants U.S. companies to set a "gold standard" for investment and foster a fairer, more transparent way of doing business in Myanmar. (AP Photo/File)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're A

    FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're A

    Posted: 5/18/2013 9:24:32 AM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2007 file photo, businessman Tay Za speaks at a reception dinner on the third anniversary of his airline, "Air Bagan," at a hotel in Yangon, Myanmar. If you're American and want to do business in Myanmar, there's a list of people and companies that by law you have to steer clear of, including Tay Zay. The Obama administration has said it wants U.S. companies to set a "gold standard" for investment and foster a fairer, more transparent way of doing business in Myanmar. (AP Photo/File)