international terrorism Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In a July 5, 2006, file photo  Terence J. Bonner, former president of the National Border Patrol Council testifies before members of the House Subcommittee on International Terro

    FILE - In a July 5, 2006, file photo Terence J. Bonner, former president of the National Border Patrol Council testifies before members of the House Subcommittee on International Terro

    Posted: 8/17/2012 1:48:19 AM EST
    FILE - In a July 5, 2006, file photo Terence J. Bonner, former president of the National Border Patrol Council testifies before members of the House Subcommittee on International Terrorism and Nonproliferation in Imperial Beach, Calif. Bonner, the leader of a union representing Border Patrol agents for more than two decades until his retirement last year was indicted by a federal grand jury Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, on charges of diverting hundreds of thousands of dollars in union funds for personal use. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi, File)
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    Posted: 3/6/2012 9:08:02 AM EST
    The Nazi era Valentin bunker built using thousands of forced labour from 1943 to March 1945 for the construction of submarines, but unfinished due to two British air-raids and the end of World War II, is pictured in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can
  •  - To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 9:07:27 AM EST
    Rosemaie Mielke is pictured in her apartment in a reconstructed World War Two bunker in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/
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    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 9:06:55 AM EST
    People pass the music bunker, a reconstructed World War Two bunker in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/ REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
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    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 9:05:44 AM EST
    People pass the music bunker, a reconstructed World War Two bunker in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/ REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
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    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 9:05:01 AM EST
    A reconstructed World War Two bunker is pictured in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/ REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (GERMANY -
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    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 9:04:25 AM EST
    Drummer Sascha Barasa Suso performs in his studio in a reconstructed World War Two bunker in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/
  •  - To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 9:03:29 AM EST
    Rosemaie Mielke is pictured in her apartment in a reconstructed World War Two bunker in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/
  •  - To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 9:02:36 AM EST
    A reconstructed World War Two bunker is pictured in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/ REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (GERMANY -
  •  - To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 9:01:05 AM EST
    People pass a wall-painting on a reconstructed World War Two bunker in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/ REUTERS/Fabian
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    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 8:59:52 AM EST
    A reconstructed World War Two bunker is pictured in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/ REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (GERMANY -
  •  - To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 8:59:18 AM EST
    A reconstructed World War Two bunker is pictured in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story GERMANY-BUNKERS/ REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (GERMANY -
  •  - To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 8:58:30 AM EST
    Architect Rainer Mielke is pictured in his apartment on the roof of a reconstructed World War Two bunker in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can extend into the hundreds of thousands of euros a year. Picture taken February 22, 2012. To go with Story
  •  - To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 8:57:32 AM EST
    The Nazi era Valentin bunker built using thousands of forced labour from 1943 to March 1945 for the construction of submarines, but unfinished due to two British air-raids and the end of World War II, is pictured in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can
  •  - To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 8:56:44 AM EST
    The Nazi era Valentin bunker built using thousands of forced labour from 1943 to March 1945 for the construction of submarines, but unfinished due to two British air-raids and the end of World War II, is pictured in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can
  •  - To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    To go with story GERMANY-BUNKER/

    Posted: 3/6/2012 8:55:41 AM EST
    The Nazi era Valentin bunker built using thousands of forced labour from 1943 to March 1945 for the construction of submarines, but unfinished due to two British air-raids and the end of World War II, is pictured in Bremen, February 22, 2012. In 2007, Germany decided it was anachronistic to continue the upkeep of its 2,000 above- and below-ground bunkers built before and during World War Two and in the Cold War. The dangers it faced were no longer conventional warfare, with air raids, artillery and tanks, but rather international terrorism and natural catastrophes - against which the bunkers offered little protection. Germany started decommissioning the bunkers, beginning with some 220 above-ground WWII ones owned by the state. Considering what to do with them, it realised that blowing up these cement fortifications often embedded in dense inner cities was not an option. Instead, it decided to sell them off, to rake in revenue and rid itself of the maintenance costs, which can
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    Posted: 1/22/2012 8:25:46 PM EST
    Marc Grossman the special U.S. envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan speaks during a joint press conference with Afghanistan's Deputy Foreign Minister Jawed Ludin, unseen, in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012. Marc Grossman, a top American diplomat visiting Afghanistan, says the United States wants the Taliban to issue statements disassociating themselves from international terrorism and saying they want to join a peace process to end the 10-year war. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)