intellectual property Photos on Townhall

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              In this  Feb. 11, 2013 photo, Przemek Berendt, the vice president for global marketing at Luxoft, an IT services outsourcing company, works at a company office in Krakow, Poland.  Luxof

    In this Feb. 11, 2013 photo, Przemek Berendt, the vice president for global marketing at Luxoft, an IT services outsourcing company, works at a company office in Krakow, Poland. Luxof

    Posted: 2/27/2013 10:28:37 AM EST
    In this Feb. 11, 2013 photo, Przemek Berendt, the vice president for global marketing at Luxoft, an IT services outsourcing company, works at a company office in Krakow, Poland. Luxoft, which is headquartered in Russia, is just one of dozens of international companies that have outsourced key business services to Poland, making the Eastern European country the outsourcing destination in Europe. In fact, the outsourcing sector in Poland is going so strong now that it is even starting to attract workers from Western Europe. Berendt says a key factor in Poland’s attractiveness to companies is the country’s political stability and the fact that as an EU member, it has a strong rule of law and protects intellectual property rights. That’s important for Luxoft, which creates trading platforms for investment banks and automotive software. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
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              In this  Feb. 11, 2013 photo, Przemek Berendt, the vice president for global marketing at Luxoft, an IT services outsourcing company, speaks on his phone  in Krakow, Poland, on Monday F

    In this Feb. 11, 2013 photo, Przemek Berendt, the vice president for global marketing at Luxoft, an IT services outsourcing company, speaks on his phone in Krakow, Poland, on Monday F

    Posted: 2/27/2013 10:28:32 AM EST
    In this Feb. 11, 2013 photo, Przemek Berendt, the vice president for global marketing at Luxoft, an IT services outsourcing company, speaks on his phone in Krakow, Poland, on Monday Feb. 11, 2013. Luxoft, which is headquartered in Russia, is just one of dozens of international companies that have outsourced key business services to Poland, making the Eastern European country the outsourcing destination in Europe. In fact, the outsourcing sector in Poland is going so strong now that it is even starting to attract workers from Western Europe. Berendt says a key factor in Poland’s attractiveness to companies is the country’s political stability and the fact that as an EU member, it has a strong rule of law and protects intellectual property rights. That’s important for Luxoft, which creates trading platforms for investment banks and automotive software. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
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              Attorney General Eric Holder, center, speaks about strategy to mitigate the theft of U.S. trade secrets, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013, in the Eisenhower Executive Office building on the Whi

    Attorney General Eric Holder, center, speaks about strategy to mitigate the theft of U.S. trade secrets, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013, in the Eisenhower Executive Office building on the Whi

    Posted: 2/20/2013 6:19:00 PM EST
    Attorney General Eric Holder, center, speaks about strategy to mitigate the theft of U.S. trade secrets, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013, in the Eisenhower Executive Office building on the White House complex in Washington. From left are, Undersecretary of Stat Robert Hormats; U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator Victoria Espinel; Holder; Acting Commerce Deputy Secretary Rebecca Blank; Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer; and General Electric Vice President Karan Bhatia. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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              FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2011 file photo, designer Jason Wu takes a bow after presenting his Spring 2012 collection during Fashion Week in New York. Wu may have won international recogni

    FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2011 file photo, designer Jason Wu takes a bow after presenting his Spring 2012 collection during Fashion Week in New York. Wu may have won international recogni

    Posted: 1/22/2013 7:13:29 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2011 file photo, designer Jason Wu takes a bow after presenting his Spring 2012 collection during Fashion Week in New York. Wu may have won international recognition for twice designing inaugural gowns for U.S. first lady Michelle Obama, but judges in his native Taiwan seem unimpressed. Taiwan's Intellectual Property Court ruled Monday, Jan. 21, 2013 that Wu's new label "Miss Wu" could not be registered as a brand because it was not distinctive enough. He designed Michelle Obama's white inaugural gown in 2008. On Monday, she appeared in another of his creations, a shiny gown with a red halter top. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
  •  - Director of the State Intellectual Property Office of China Tian answers a question during a news conference in Beijing

    Director of the State Intellectual Property Office of China Tian answers a question during a news conference in Beijing

    Posted: 11/11/2012 4:05:09 AM EST
    Director of the State Intellectual Property Office of China Tian Lipu answers a question during a news conference in Beijing October 18, 2007. REUTERS/Jason Lee
  •  - Director of the State Intellectual Property Office of China Tian answers a question during a news conference in Beijing

    Director of the State Intellectual Property Office of China Tian answers a question during a news conference in Beijing

    Posted: 11/11/2012 4:05:09 AM EST
    Director of the State Intellectual Property Office of China Tian Lipu answers a question during a news conference in Beijing October 18, 2007. REUTERS/Jason Lee
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              File - In this combination of two undated handout photos made available by the Centro de Estudios Borjanos,  the 20th century Ecce Homo-style fresco of Christ , left and the 'restored'

    File - In this combination of two undated handout photos made available by the Centro de Estudios Borjanos, the 20th century Ecce Homo-style fresco of Christ , left and the 'restored'

    Posted: 9/21/2012 12:23:48 PM EST
    File - In this combination of two undated handout photos made available by the Centro de Estudios Borjanos, the 20th century Ecce Homo-style fresco of Christ , left and the 'restored' version, at right. Only a month has gone by since an 80-year-old artist won global infamy for botching a restoration of a fresco of Christ in a little-known Spanish town, but it took even less time for Internet entrepreneurs to start copying her image compared to a monkey’s head to sell everything from T-shirts to cellphone covers and wine. Now a mortified Cecilia Gimenez has lawyers researching her intellectual property rights, and could demand a cut of profits to benefit charity for her amazingly popular disfiguration of the fresco from the genre known as “Ecce Homo” (“Behold the Man) style. On Twitter, where the story and image went viral, her version is known as “Ecce Mono” (“Behold the Monkey.)” (AP Photo/Centro de Estudios Borjanos, File)
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              FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2010 file photo, an Israeli man sits in his stall where he sells skull caps in downtown Jerusalem. A lawyer representing DC Comics and Marvel says the co

    FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2010 file photo, an Israeli man sits in his stall where he sells skull caps in downtown Jerusalem. A lawyer representing DC Comics and Marvel says the co

    Posted: 9/20/2012 1:08:37 PM EST
    FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2010 file photo, an Israeli man sits in his stall where he sells skull caps in downtown Jerusalem. A lawyer representing DC Comics and Marvel says the comics giants are suing a Jerusalem vendor for selling Jewish skullcaps, or kippas, adorned with unauthorized images of crime-fighting superheroes Batman and Spiderman. Lawyer Chagay Netzer said the "Kippa Man" store was violating the intellectual property rights of both companies. DC Comics and Marvel are each demanding 25,500 U.S. dollars in damages and expect the store to stop selling the kippas.(AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill, File)
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              In this picture taken Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010,  Jewish women buys men's skull caps during a designer fashion fair in Jerusalem. A lawyer representing DC Comics and Marvel says the comic

    In this picture taken Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010, Jewish women buys men's skull caps during a designer fashion fair in Jerusalem. A lawyer representing DC Comics and Marvel says the comic

    Posted: 9/20/2012 1:08:37 PM EST
    In this picture taken Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010, Jewish women buys men's skull caps during a designer fashion fair in Jerusalem. A lawyer representing DC Comics and Marvel says the comics giants are suing a Jerusalem vendor for selling Jewish skullcaps, or kippas, adorned with unauthorized images of crime-fighting superheroes Batman and Spiderman. Lawyer Chagay Netzer said the "Kippa Man" store was violating the intellectual property rights of both companies. DC Comics and Marvel are each demanding 25,500 U.S. dollars in damages and expect the store to stop selling the kippas. (AP Photo/Maya Hasson, File)
  •  - Gurry Director General of the WIPO gestures during a news conference on the International Patent System in 2009 at the UN European headquarters in Geneva

    Gurry Director General of the WIPO gestures during a news conference on the International Patent System in 2009 at the UN European headquarters in Geneva

    Posted: 8/30/2012 11:06:23 AM EST
    Francis Gurry, Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), gestures during a news conference on the International Patent System in 2009 at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva February 8, 2010. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
  •  - Gurry Director General of the WIPO gestures during a news conference on the International Patent System in 2009 at the UN European headquarters in Geneva

    Gurry Director General of the WIPO gestures during a news conference on the International Patent System in 2009 at the UN European headquarters in Geneva

    Posted: 8/30/2012 11:06:23 AM EST
    Francis Gurry, Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), gestures during a news conference on the International Patent System in 2009 at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva February 8, 2010. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
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              Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliam

    Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliam

    Posted: 7/5/2012 3:38:22 PM EST
    Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France. The European Parliament has overwhelmingly defeated the international ACTA anti-piracy agreement, after fears that it would limit Internet freedom. A "no" vote in the Parliament on Wednesday would kill the treaty as far as the European Union is concerned. Supporters say that ACTA — the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement — is needed to harmonize international standards to protect the rights of those who produce music, movies, pharmaceuticals, fashion goods and other products that often fall victim to piracy and intellectual property theft. Opponents say it would stifle free access to information. (AP Photo/Christian Lutz)
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              Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliam

    Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliam

    Posted: 7/5/2012 3:38:22 PM EST
    Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France. The European Parliament has overwhelmingly defeated the international ACTA anti-piracy agreement, after fears that it would limit Internet freedom. A "no" vote in the Parliament on Wednesday would kill the treaty as far as the European Union is concerned. Supporters say that ACTA — the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement — is needed to harmonize international standards to protect the rights of those who produce music, movies, pharmaceuticals, fashion goods and other products that often fall victim to piracy and intellectual property theft. Opponents say it would stifle free access to information. (AP Photo/Christian Lutz)
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              Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliam

    Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliam

    Posted: 7/5/2012 3:38:22 PM EST
    Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France. The European Parliament has overwhelmingly defeated the international ACTA anti-piracy agreement, after fears that it would limit Internet freedom. A "no" vote in the Parliament on Wednesday would kill the treaty as far as the European Union is concerned. Supporters say that ACTA — the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement — is needed to harmonize international standards to protect the rights of those who produce music, movies, pharmaceuticals, fashion goods and other products that often fall victim to piracy and intellectual property theft. Opponents say it would stifle free access to information. (AP Photo/Christian Lutz)
  •  - Employee sits on a sofa as she holds an Angry Bird cup at an office of Rovio in Shanghai

    Employee sits on a sofa as she holds an Angry Bird cup at an office of Rovio in Shanghai

    Posted: 6/26/2012 12:49:16 PM EST
    An employee sits on a sofa as she holds an Angry Bird cup at an office of Rovio in Shanghai June 20, 2012. When Peter Vesterbacka visited China last spring, the marketing chief for Rovio, the Finnish firm behind the video game Angry Birds, saw fake Angry Birds products everywhere - and he was happy about it. That rosy view of an intellectual property problem that has vexed global brands for decades - and sparked friction in China's relations with the United States and others - underpins Rovio's novel approach to the world's fastest growing consumer market. Picture taken June 20, 2012. REUTERS/Aly Song
  •  - Employee walks out an office of Rovio, the company which created the video game Angry Birds, in Shanghai

    Employee walks out an office of Rovio, the company which created the video game Angry Birds, in Shanghai

    Posted: 6/26/2012 12:49:16 PM EST
    An employee walks out an office of Rovio, the company which created the video game Angry Birds, in Shanghai June 20, 2012. When Peter Vesterbacka visited China last spring, the marketing chief for Rovio, the Finnish firm behind the video game Angry Birds, saw fake Angry Birds products everywhere - and he was happy about it. That rosy view of an intellectual property problem that has vexed global brands for decades - and sparked friction in China's relations with the United States and others - underpins Rovio's novel approach to the world's fastest growing consumer market. Picture taken June 20, 2012. REUTERS/Aly Song
  •  - Employee works inside an office of Rovio, the company which created the video game Angry Birds, in Shanghai

    Employee works inside an office of Rovio, the company which created the video game Angry Birds, in Shanghai

    Posted: 6/26/2012 12:49:16 PM EST
    An employee works inside an office of Rovio, the company which created the video game Angry Birds, in Shanghai June 20, 2012. When Peter Vesterbacka visited China last spring, the marketing chief for Rovio, the Finnish firm behind the video game Angry Birds, saw fake Angry Birds products everywhere - and he was happy about it. That rosy view of an intellectual property problem that has vexed global brands for decades - and sparked friction in China's relations with the United States and others - underpins Rovio's novel approach to the world's fastest growing consumer market. Picture taken June 20, 2012. REUTERS/Aly Song
  •  - Ethnic Uighur man sleeps in front of posters advertising medical products as an employee talks on her mobile phone at the entrance of a pharmacy in Aksu

    Ethnic Uighur man sleeps in front of posters advertising medical products as an employee talks on her mobile phone at the entrance of a pharmacy in Aksu

    Posted: 6/12/2012 1:37:01 AM EST
    An ethnic Uighur man sleeps in front of posters advertising medical products as an employee talks on her mobile phone at the entrance of a pharmacy in Aksu, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region June 11, 2012. China has overhauled parts of its intellectual property laws to allow its drugmakers to make cheap copies of medicines still under patent protection in an initiative likely to unnerve foreign pharmaceutical companies. Picture taken June 11, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer (CHINA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS CRIME LAW POVERTY) CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA
  •  - File photo of visitors at "You Tube" stand during the MIDEM in Cannes

    File photo of visitors at "You Tube" stand during the MIDEM in Cannes

    Posted: 4/20/2012 8:53:03 AM EST
    File photo of visitors at "You Tube" stand during the MIDEM, which is the international record music publishing and video music market, in Cannes January 23, 2011. A German court in Hamburg ruled on April 20, 2012 that Google's YouTube service did not do enough to prevent its users from posting seven copyrighted music clips without permission.The suit was brought against YouTube in 2010 by German royalty collections body GEMA and several other groups handling the intellectual property rights to music. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (FRANCE - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS)
  •  - A visitor looks at Apple patents displayed at the World Intellectual Property Organization headquarters in Geneva

    A visitor looks at Apple patents displayed at the World Intellectual Property Organization headquarters in Geneva

    Posted: 4/11/2012 4:18:30 PM EST
    A visitor looks at Apple patents displayed at the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) headquarters in Geneva March 29, 2012. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse


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