Independent Voters Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2012, file photo, Republican vice presidential candidate Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., takes questions during a campaign stop in Dover, N.H. Political mailers are stu

    FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2012, file photo, Republican vice presidential candidate Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., takes questions during a campaign stop in Dover, N.H. Political mailers are stu

    Posted: 10/31/2012 3:08:35 AM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2012, file photo, Republican vice presidential candidate Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., takes questions during a campaign stop in Dover, N.H. Political mailers are stuffed in their front doors and the phone rings nonstop. Under a fall canopy of crimson and golden leaves, the battle for independent voters is being waged hour by hour in battleground New Hampshire. The state offers only four electoral votes in next week's presidential election, but President Barack Obama and challenger Mitt Romney are vying fiercely here for the remaining independent voters, who are decidedly ambivalent about either candidate. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
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              FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2012, file photo, President Barack Obama, left, speaks to supporters at a campaign event at Elm Street Middle School in Nashua, N.H. Political mailers are stuffe

    FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2012, file photo, President Barack Obama, left, speaks to supporters at a campaign event at Elm Street Middle School in Nashua, N.H. Political mailers are stuffe

    Posted: 10/31/2012 3:08:35 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2012, file photo, President Barack Obama, left, speaks to supporters at a campaign event at Elm Street Middle School in Nashua, N.H. Political mailers are stuffed in their front doors and the phone rings nonstop. Under a fall canopy of crimson and golden leaves, the battle for independent voters is being waged hour by hour in battleground New Hampshire. The state offers only four electoral votes in next week's presidential election, but Obama and challenger Mitt Romney are vying fiercely here for the remaining independent voters, who are decidedly ambivalent about either candidate. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
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              Joe Galli jokingly covers his face while walking with his wife, Thyra, by an Obama/Biden sign in front of a neighbor's home, Friday, Oct. 5, 2012, in Portsmouth, N.H. New Hampshire's ni

    Joe Galli jokingly covers his face while walking with his wife, Thyra, by an Obama/Biden sign in front of a neighbor's home, Friday, Oct. 5, 2012, in Portsmouth, N.H. New Hampshire's ni

    Posted: 10/8/2012 3:38:27 PM EST
    Joe Galli jokingly covers his face while walking with his wife, Thyra, by an Obama/Biden sign in front of a neighbor's home, Friday, Oct. 5, 2012, in Portsmouth, N.H. New Hampshire's nickname is "the Granite State" but there's nothing solid about its political landscape. Independent voters have been the reason in recent presidential elections. Today, former factory towns to the south _ Manchester and Nashua _ typically vote Republican as do the rural small towns up north, while state capital Concord and university towns like Durham, Dover, Keene and Hanover tend to lean Democratic. And the entire state is peppered with independents like Joe and Thyra Galli of Portsmouth. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
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              This photo taken Oct. 5, 2012 shows independent voters Joe and Thyra Galli taking a break during their daily walk to watch fishermen, in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra plans to vote for Obama a

    This photo taken Oct. 5, 2012 shows independent voters Joe and Thyra Galli taking a break during their daily walk to watch fishermen, in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra plans to vote for Obama a

    Posted: 10/8/2012 3:38:27 PM EST
    This photo taken Oct. 5, 2012 shows independent voters Joe and Thyra Galli taking a break during their daily walk to watch fishermen, in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra plans to vote for Obama and Joe is supporting Romney. New Hampshire's nickname is "the Granite State" but there's nothing solid about its political landscape. Independent voters have been the reason in recent presidential elections. Today, former factory towns to the south _ Manchester and Nashua _ typically vote Republican as do the rural small towns up north, while state capital Concord and university towns like Durham, Dover, Keene and Hanover tend to lean Democratic. And the entire state is peppered with independents like Joe and Thyra Galli of Portsmouth. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
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              In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, independent voters Thyra and Joe Galli relax in their flower garden, in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra plans to vote for Obama and Joe is supporting Romney. Ne

    In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, independent voters Thyra and Joe Galli relax in their flower garden, in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra plans to vote for Obama and Joe is supporting Romney. Ne

    Posted: 10/8/2012 3:38:27 PM EST
    In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, independent voters Thyra and Joe Galli relax in their flower garden, in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra plans to vote for Obama and Joe is supporting Romney. New Hampshire's nickname is "the Granite State" but there's nothing solid about its political landscape. Independent voters have been the reason in recent presidential elections. Today, former factory towns to the south _ Manchester and Nashua _ typically vote Republican as do the rural small towns up north, while state capital Concord and university towns like Durham, Dover, Keene and Hanover tend to lean Democratic. And the entire state is peppered with independents like Joe and Thyra Galli of Portsmouth. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
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              This photo taken Oct. 5, 2012 shows independent voters Thyra and Joe Galli reading up on political news on Internet and with print newspapers at their home in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra pla

    This photo taken Oct. 5, 2012 shows independent voters Thyra and Joe Galli reading up on political news on Internet and with print newspapers at their home in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra pla

    Posted: 10/8/2012 3:38:27 PM EST
    This photo taken Oct. 5, 2012 shows independent voters Thyra and Joe Galli reading up on political news on Internet and with print newspapers at their home in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra plans to vote for Obama and Joe is supporting Romney. New Hampshire's nickname is "the Granite State" but there's nothing solid about its political landscape. Independent voters have been the reason in recent presidential elections. Today, former factory towns to the south _ Manchester and Nashua _ typically vote Republican as do the rural small towns up north, while state capital Concord and university towns like Durham, Dover, Keene and Hanover tend to lean Democratic. And the entire state is peppered with independents like Joe and Thyra Galli of Portsmouth. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
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              In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, independent voters Thyra and Joe Galli read up on political news on Internet and with print newspapers at their home in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra plans to

    In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, independent voters Thyra and Joe Galli read up on political news on Internet and with print newspapers at their home in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra plans to

    Posted: 10/8/2012 3:38:27 PM EST
    In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, independent voters Thyra and Joe Galli read up on political news on Internet and with print newspapers at their home in Portsmouth, N.H. Thyra plans to vote for Obama and Joe is supporting Romney. New Hampshire's nickname is "the Granite State" but there's nothing solid about its political landscape. Independent voters have been the reason in recent presidential elections. Today, former factory towns to the south _ Manchester and Nashua _ typically vote Republican as do the rural small towns up north, while state capital Concord and university towns like Durham, Dover, Keene and Hanover tend to lean Democratic. And the entire state is peppered with independents like Joe and Thyra Galli of Portsmouth. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
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              In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, Thyra Galli, an independent voter, sits next to a political sign for the ticket she's supporting, in Portsmouth, N.H. New Hampshire's nickname is "the

    In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, Thyra Galli, an independent voter, sits next to a political sign for the ticket she's supporting, in Portsmouth, N.H. New Hampshire's nickname is "the

    Posted: 10/8/2012 3:38:27 PM EST
    In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, Thyra Galli, an independent voter, sits next to a political sign for the ticket she's supporting, in Portsmouth, N.H. New Hampshire's nickname is "the Granite State" but there's nothing solid about its political landscape. Independent voters have been the reason in recent presidential elections. Today, former factory towns to the south _ Manchester and Nashua _ typically vote Republican as do the rural small towns up north, while state capital Concord and university towns like Durham, Dover, Keene and Hanover tend to lean Democratic. And the entire state is peppered with independents like Joe and Thyra Galli of Portsmouth. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
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              In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, Joe Galli, an independent voter, holds up a sign for the team he'll be voting for in November, in Portsmouth, N.H. New Hampshire's nickname is "the Gra

    In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, Joe Galli, an independent voter, holds up a sign for the team he'll be voting for in November, in Portsmouth, N.H. New Hampshire's nickname is "the Gra

    Posted: 10/8/2012 3:38:27 PM EST
    In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2012, Joe Galli, an independent voter, holds up a sign for the team he'll be voting for in November, in Portsmouth, N.H. New Hampshire's nickname is "the Granite State" but there's nothing solid about its political landscape. Independent voters have been the reason in recent presidential elections. Today, former factory towns to the south _ Manchester and Nashua _ typically vote Republican as do the rural small towns up north, while state capital Concord and university towns like Durham, Dover, Keene and Hanover tend to lean Democratic. And the entire state is peppered with independents like Joe and Thyra Galli of Portsmouth. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
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    Posted: 6/14/2012 6:15:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 22, 2011 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney works with volunteers making calls while visiting his Romney For President New Hampshire Headquarters in Manchester, N.H. Perhaps no presidential battleground will test the leanings of critical independent voters more than the ?Live Free or Die? state, the launching pad for Mitt Romney's White House bid. President Barack Obama won New Hampshire handily four years ago, but the former Massachusetts governor's ties run deep in a state that has vacillated between Republicans and Democrats in recent years. (AP Photo/Cheryl Senter, File)
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    Posted: 6/14/2012 6:15:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 1, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in Nashua, N.H. Perhaps no presidential battleground will test the leanings of critical independent voters more than the ?Live Free or Die? state, the launching pad for Mitt Romney's White House bid. President Barack Obama won New Hampshire handily four years ago, but the former Massachusetts governor's ties run deep in a state that has vacillated between Republicans and Democrats in recent years. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
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    Posted: 6/1/2012 9:55:46 AM EST
    House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio meets with reporters following a GOP strategy session on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 31, 2012. Republicans stung by the culture wars that dominated political discourse this year are standing down on social issues. They are acutely aware that the presidential and congressional elections five months off are expected to turn on a thin margin of independent voters neither party can afford to alienate. Boehner vowed to reverse President Barack Obama?s birth control policy. But there?s no sign of any such legislation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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    Posted: 5/26/2012 4:30:45 PM EST
    In this May 23, 2012, photo, President Barack Obama speaks to supporters during a campaign fundraiser in Denver. Government spending and debt are emerging as a campaign tug-of-war. Republican Mitt Romney blames President Barack Obama for a "prairie fire of debt." Obama calls the charge a "cowpie of distortion." Both candidates are reaching for unaligned, independent voters anxious about who's going to get stuck with the bill.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
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    Posted: 5/21/2012 7:20:46 AM EST
    In this May 16, 2012, photo, Nebraska state Sen. Deb Fischer addresses supporters with her former opponent, state Attorney Gen. Jon Bruning applauding, right. For Senate Republicans, 2012 is starting a lot like 2010. Republicans have a shot at taking control of the Senate from Democrats as long as insurgent conservatives who are defeating the GOP?s more establishment candidates in primaries don?t frighten off independent voters like they did two years ago. Fischer, a little-known state senator, became the latest unexpected Senate Republican nominee Tuesday, rallying late to upset the favored _ and better funded _ choices of both the party?s mainstream and tea party establishments. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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    Posted: 4/11/2012 5:55:46 PM EST
    FILE - I this Feb. 22, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidates, from left, Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich share the stage during a Republican presidential debate in Mesa, Ariz. If he can manage it, now is the time for Mitt Romney to mend his Republican fences and bring around those dubious voters who kept spurning him for Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and others on the right. After a nasty Republican primary battle, he's got to somehow fire up the party's staunchest conservatives without alienating independent voters he'll need to defeat President Barack Obama in the fall. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
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    Posted: 4/11/2012 5:55:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, left, and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney talk following a Republican presidential debate in Mesa, Ariz. If he can manage it, now is the time for Mitt Romney to mend his Republican fences and bring around those dubious voters who kept spurning him for Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and others on the right. After a nasty Republican primary battle, he's got to somehow fire up the party's staunchest conservatives without alienating independent voters he'll need to defeat President Barack Obama in the fall. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)