Ideology Photos on Townhall

  •  - Magazine supplement containing illegible text of Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf and commentary on blue background is pictured in Berlin

    Magazine supplement containing illegible text of Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf and commentary on blue background is pictured in Berlin

    Posted: 1/26/2012 10:43:20 AM EST
    A magazine supplement, containing the illegible text of Adolf Hitler's "Mein Kampf" and a commentary on a blue background, is pictured in Berlin January 26, 2012. Excerpts from "Mein Kampf" will be wiped from the magazine supplement due to go on sale in Germany on Thursday following the threat of legal action from the state of Bavaria, the publishers of the magazine said on Wednesday. Passages from the Nazi dictator's work were to appear alongside critical analysis as a supplement to the historical magazine 'Zeitungszeugen'. Now only the accompanying commentary to the text will be legible. "Mein Kampf", which outlines the Nazi doctrine of Aryan supremacy, is difficult to obtain in Germany due to strict publishing laws. The dissemination of Nazi ideology for non-educational purposes has been outlawed in Germany since the end of World War Two. The word in the black box reads: "Illegible." REUTERS/Thomas Peter (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS MEDIA)
  •  - Magazine supplement with image of Adolf Hitler and title 'The Unreadable Book' is pictured in Berlin

    Magazine supplement with image of Adolf Hitler and title 'The Unreadable Book' is pictured in Berlin

    Posted: 1/26/2012 10:40:37 AM EST
    A magazine supplement with an image of Adolf Hitler and the title 'The Unreadable Book' is pictured in Berlin January 26, 2012. Excerpts from Hitler's "Mein Kampf" will be wiped from the magazine supplement due to go on sale in Germany on Thursday following the threat of legal action from the state of Bavaria, the publishers of the magazine said on Wednesday. Passages from the Nazi dictator's work were to appear alongside critical analysis as a supplement to the historical magazine 'Zeitungszeugen'. Now only the accompanying commentary to the text will be legible. "Mein Kampf", which outlines the Nazi doctrine of Aryan supremacy, is difficult to obtain in Germany due to strict publishing laws. The dissemination of Nazi ideology for non-educational purposes has been outlawed in Germany since the end of World War Two. REUTERS/Thomas Peter (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS MEDIA)
  •  - Man passes news stand in Berlin

    Man passes news stand in Berlin

    Posted: 1/26/2012 7:48:38 AM EST
    A man passes a news stand selling a magazine supplement with an image of Adolf Hitler and the title 'The Unreadable Book' in Berlin January 26, 2012. Excerpts from Hitler's Mein Kampf will be wiped from a magazine supplement due to go on sale in Germany on Thursday following the threat of legal action from the state of Bavaria, the publishers of the magazine said on Wednesday. Passages from the Nazi dictator's work were to appear alongside critical analysis as a supplement to the historical magazine 'Zeitungszeugen'. Now only the accompanying commentary to the text will be legible. Mein Kampf, which outlines the Nazi doctrine of Aryan supremacy, is difficult to obtain in Germany due to strict publishing laws. The dissemination of Nazi ideology for non-educational purposes has been outlawed in Germany since the end of World War Two. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz (GERMANY - Tags: MEDIA)
  •  - Inside cover of magazine supplement with image of Hitler is pictured in Berlin

    Inside cover of magazine supplement with image of Hitler is pictured in Berlin

    Posted: 1/25/2012 9:37:18 AM EST
    The inside cover of a magazine supplement with images of Adolf Hitler and the title 'The Unreadable Book', is pictured in Berlin January 25, 2012. Excerpts from Hitler's Mein Kampf will be wiped from a magazine supplement due to go on sale in Germany on Thursday following the threat of legal action from the state of Bavaria, the publishers of the magazine said on Wednesday. Passages from the Nazi dictator's work were to appear alongside critical analysis as a supplement to the historical magazine 'Zeitungszeugen'. Now only the accompanying commentary to the text will be legible. Mein Kampf, which outlines the Nazi doctrine of Aryan supremacy, is difficult to obtain in Germany due to strict publishing laws. The dissemination of Nazi ideology for non-educational purposes has been outlawed in Germany since the end of World War Two. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski (GERMANY) - Tags: MEDIA)
  •  - Inside cover of magazine supplement with image of Hitler is pictured in Berlin

    Inside cover of magazine supplement with image of Hitler is pictured in Berlin

    Posted: 1/25/2012 9:36:43 AM EST
    The inside cover of a magazine supplement with images of Adolf Hitler and the title 'The Unreadable Book', is pictured in Berlin January 25, 2012. Excerpts from Hitler's Mein Kampf will be wiped from a magazine supplement due to go on sale in Germany on Thursday following the threat of legal action from the state of Bavaria, the publishers of the magazine said on Wednesday. Passages from the Nazi dictator's work were to appear alongside critical analysis as a supplement to the historical magazine 'Zeitungszeugen'. Now only the accompanying commentary to the text will be legible. Mein Kampf, which outlines the Nazi doctrine of Aryan supremacy, is difficult to obtain in Germany due to strict publishing laws. The dissemination of Nazi ideology for non-educational purposes has been outlawed in Germany since the end of World War Two. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski (GERMANY) - Tags: MEDIA)
  •  - Cover of magazine supplement with image of Hitler is pictured in Berlin

    Cover of magazine supplement with image of Hitler is pictured in Berlin

    Posted: 1/25/2012 9:35:15 AM EST
    The cover of a magazine supplement with an image of Adolf Hitler and the title 'The Unreadable Book', is pictured in Berlin January 25, 2012. Excerpts from Hitler's Mein Kampf will be wiped from a magazine supplement due to go on sale in Germany on Thursday following the threat of legal action from the state of Bavaria, the publishers of the magazine said on Wednesday. Passages from the Nazi dictator's work were to appear alongside critical analysis as a supplement to the historical magazine 'Zeitungszeugen'. Now only the accompanying commentary to the text will be legible. Mein Kampf, which outlines the Nazi doctrine of Aryan supremacy, is difficult to obtain in Germany due to strict publishing laws. The dissemination of Nazi ideology for non-educational purposes has been outlawed in Germany since the end of World War Two. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski (GERMANY) - Tags: MEDIA)
  •  - Cover of magazine supplement with image of Hitler is pictured in Berlin

    Cover of magazine supplement with image of Hitler is pictured in Berlin

    Posted: 1/25/2012 9:35:00 AM EST
    The cover of a magazine supplement with an image of Adolf Hitler and the title 'The Unreadable Book', is pictured in Berlin January 25, 2012. Excerpts from Hitler's Mein Kampf will be wiped from a magazine supplement due to go on sale in Germany on Thursday following the threat of legal action from the state of Bavaria, the publishers of the magazine said on Wednesday. Passages from the Nazi dictator's work were to appear alongside critical analysis as a supplement to the historical magazine 'Zeitungszeugen'. Now only the accompanying commentary to the text will be legible. Mein Kampf, which outlines the Nazi doctrine of Aryan supremacy, is difficult to obtain in Germany due to strict publishing laws. The dissemination of Nazi ideology for non-educational purposes has been outlawed in Germany since the end of World War Two. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski (GERMANY) - Tags: MEDIA)
  •  - File photo of Wu, chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, smiling in Beijing

    File photo of Wu, chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, smiling in Beijing

    Posted: 7/7/2011 1:44:56 AM EST
    Wu Bangguo, chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, smiles as he stands in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing in this February 22, 2011 file photo. The prospect of former Chinese President Jiang Zemin's passing would add a breeze of uncertainty to a leadership transition generally thought to be headed for a smooth shift from President Hu Jintao to a new generation led by Xi Jinping, currently vice president. That would take place at the 18th Communist Party Congress expected sometime in the autumn of 2012. Among the Jiang allies still in senior posts are: Wu, parliament chief and the second ranking person in the nine-member Politburo Standing Committee; Jia Qinglin, who heads a parliamentary advisory body and is ranked fourth; and Li Changchun, who oversees propaganda and ideology and is ranked fifth. REUTERS/Adrian Bradshaw/Pool/Files (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS HEADSHOT)
  •  - File photo of China's Politburo Standing Committee member Li in Ljubljana

    File photo of China's Politburo Standing Committee member Li in Ljubljana

    Posted: 7/7/2011 1:42:49 AM EST
    China's Politburo Standing Committee member Li Changchun speaks in Ljubljana in this April 15, 2011 file photo. The prospect of former Chinese President Jiang Zemin's passing would add a breeze of uncertainty to a leadership transition generally thought to be headed for a smooth shift from President Hu Jintao to a new generation led by Xi Jinping, currently vice president. That would take place at the 18th Communist Party Congress expected sometime in the autumn of 2012. Among the Jiang allies still in senior posts are: Wu Bangguo, parliament chief and the second ranking person in the nine-member Politburo Standing Committee; Jia Qinglin, who heads a parliamentary advisory body and is ranked fourth; and Li, who oversees propaganda and ideology and is ranked fifth. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic/Files (SLOVENIA - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - File photo of Jia, chairman of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, delivering a speech in Beijing

    File photo of Jia, chairman of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, delivering a speech in Beijing

    Posted: 7/7/2011 1:39:45 AM EST
    Jia Qinglin, chairman of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), delivers a speech during the CPPCC opening ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing in this March 3, 2011 file photo. The prospect of former Chinese President Jiang Zemin's passing would add a breeze of uncertainty to a leadership transition generally thought to be headed for a smooth shift from President Hu Jintao to a new generation led by Xi Jinping, currently vice president. That would take place at the 18th Communist Party Congress expected sometime in the autumn of 2012. Among the Jiang allies still in senior posts are: Wu Bangguo, parliament chief and the second ranking person in the nine-member Politburo Standing Committee; Jia, who heads a parliamentary advisory body and is ranked fourth; and Li Changchun, who oversees propaganda and ideology and is ranked fifth. REUTERS/Jason Lee/Files (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS)
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    Posted: 5/8/2011 1:30:50 PM EST
    This undated image made available by U.S. Department of Justice in April 2011 shows the canceled passport of Tai Kuo. Kuo's journey from entrepreneur to spy is, in many ways, emblematic of how China conducts espionage in the 21st century. It is rooted in opportunity, nurtured by perseverance, sustained by greed over ideology and born of something known as "guanxi" _ a "you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours" concept based on developing close relationships. (AP Photo/U.S. Justice Department)
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    Posted: 5/8/2011 1:30:50 PM EST
    This Monday, Feb. 11, 2008 photo made available by the U.S. Department of Justice shows an investigator holding money Tai Kuo paid James Fondren that was collected on the day of Kuo's arrest in Alexandria, Va. Kuo's journey from entrepreneur to spy is, in many ways, emblematic of how China conducts espionage in the 21st century. It is rooted in opportunity, nurtured by perseverance, sustained by greed over ideology and born of something known as "guanxi" _ a "you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours" concept based on developing close relationships. (AP Photo/U.S. Justice Department)
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    Posted: 5/8/2011 1:30:49 PM EST
    This undated image made available by U.S. Department of Justice in April 2011 shows a government exhibit photograph of Tai Kuo and James Fondren on a trip to China. Kuo's journey from entrepreneur to spy is, in many ways, emblematic of how China conducts espionage in the 21st century. It is rooted in opportunity, nurtured by perseverance, sustained by greed over ideology and born of something known as "guanxi" _ a "you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours" concept based on developing close relationships. (AP Photo/U.S. Justice Department)
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    Posted: 5/2/2011 6:27:06 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 9, 2011 file photo, protesters chant slogans as they march following an attack by security forces in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt. Osama bin Laden and his jihadi rhetoric once resonated with millions, especially those in the Arab world who saw militant Islam as their best hope for throwing off the shackles of corrupt, oppressive governments. But 10 years after 9/11, the dominant theme in the uprisings across the Middle East is a clamor for democracy _ with al-Qaida's militant ideology largely relegated to the sidelines. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra, File)
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    Posted: 5/2/2011 6:26:59 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2011 file photo, anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt. Osama bin Laden and his jihadi rhetoric once resonated with millions, especially those in the Arab world who saw militant Islam as their best hope for throwing off the shackles of corrupt, oppressive governments. But 10 years after 9/11, the dominant theme in the uprisings across the Middle East is a clamor for democracy _ with al-Qaida's militant ideology largely relegated to the sidelines. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill, File)
  •  - Southern Sudanese citizens chant slogans and hold placards as they march in the streets in support of the independence referendum in Juba

    Southern Sudanese citizens chant slogans and hold placards as they march in the streets in support of the independence referendum in Juba

    Posted: 12/9/2010 8:01:43 AM EST
    Southern Sudanese citizens chant slogans and hold placards as they march in the streets in support of the independence referendum in Juba, South Sudan, December 9, 2010. The referendum on whether the oil-producing region should declare independence, scheduled for Jan. 9, is the climax of a 2005 peace deal that ended decades of north-south conflict - Africa's longest civil war that was fought over ethnicity, religion, ideology and oil and that killed 2 million people. REUTERS/Benedicte Desrus (SUDAN - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS SOCIETY)
  •  - A policeman stands guard at the entrance of a registration point on the sixth day of South Sudan's independence referendum in South Sudan

    A policeman stands guard at the entrance of a registration point on the sixth day of South Sudan's independence referendum in South Sudan

    Posted: 11/20/2010 12:33:39 PM EST
    A policeman stands guard at the entrance of a registration point on the sixth day of South Sudan's independence referendum in Wau town of Baher Al Gazal State in South Sudan November 20, 2010. The referendum on whether the oil-producing region should declare independence, scheduled for Jan. 9, is the climax of a 2005 peace deal that ended decades of north-south conflict -- Africa's longest civil war that was fought over ethnicity, religion, ideology and oil and that killed 2 million people. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS)


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