Hoax Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 3/7/2012 10:35:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2011 file photo, Australian collar bomb hoax suspect Paul Douglas Peters leaves the Federal Courthouse after waiving extradition to Australia, in Louisville, Ky, USA. Peters' lawyer Kathy Crittenden pleaded guilty Thursday, March 8, 2012, on his behalf in a Sydney courtroom to a charge of aggravated break and enter and committing a serious indictable offense by knowingly detaining 18-year-old Madeleine Pulver. (AP Photo/Ed Reinke, File)
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    Posted: 9/24/2011 3:00:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2011 file photo, Paul Douglas Peters, left, of Sydney, Australia, is escorted from the Federal Courthouse in Louisville, Ky., after he was arraigned in connection with a bomb hoax in Australia. The Australian man accused of chaining a fake bomb to a teenage girl's neck as part of an extortion attempt is being extradited from the U.S. to Australia. New South Wales police said Friday Sept. 23, 2011 that Australian detectives were sent to the U.S. to assist in the extradition (AP Photo/The Courier-Journal, Sam Upshaw Jr., File)
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    Posted: 9/14/2011 11:10:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2011 file photo, Paul Douglas Peters, left, of Sydney, Australia, is escorted from the Federal Courthouse in Louisville, Ky., after he was arraigned in connection with a bomb hoax in Australia. Peters appeared in U.S. District Court in Louisville on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2011 and waived extradition. (AP Photo/The Courier-Journal, Sam Upshaw Jr., File)
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    Posted: 9/2/2011 10:55:49 AM EST
    This image provided by Desmet on Friday, Sept. 2, 2011, shows quiz master Waldemar Torenstra, second right, during his show. The nation that brought the television world Big Brother and a hoax game show with a donor kidney as prize has now pitted five young rejected asylum seekers against one another in a Dutch trivia quiz for a euro 4,000 prize to take with them when they are sent back to their home country. The one-off show "Weg Van Nederland" (Out Of the Netherlands) shone a satirical light on the plight of young asylum seekers slated for expulsion by Dutch immigration authorities despite having spent most of their childhoods here. A Kurd whose family fled Armenia 11 years ago, won the show by correctly answering questions like, "Who was the first king of the Netherlands?" and artistically carving a map of the Netherlands out of a slab of cheese.( AP Photo/Desmet/Paul Weijenberg) MANDATORY CREDIT
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    Posted: 9/2/2011 10:55:49 AM EST
    This image provided by Desmet on Friday, Sept. 2, 2011, shows Armenian contestant identified as Gulistan, top left, and Sabina from Chechnya wearing a yellow shirt. The nation that brought the television world Big Brother and a hoax game show with a donor kidney as prize has now pitted five young rejected asylum seekers against one another in a Dutch trivia quiz for a euro 4,000 prize to take with them when they are sent back to their home country. The one-off show "Weg Van Nederland" (Out Of the Netherlands) shone a satirical light on the plight of young asylum seekers slated for expulsion by Dutch immigration authorities despite having spent most of their childhoods here. Gulistan. a Kurd whose family fled Armenia 11 years ago, won the show by correctly answering questions like, "Who was the first king of the Netherlands?" and artistically carving a map of the Netherlands out of a slab of cheese.( AP Photo/Desmet/Paul Weijenberg) MANDATORY CREDIT
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    Posted: 9/2/2011 10:55:49 AM EST
    This image provided by Desmet on Friday, Sept. 2, 2011, shows quiz master Waldemar Torenstra, center. The nation that brought the television world Big Brother and a hoax game show with a donor kidney as prize has now pitted five young rejected asylum seekers against one another in a Dutch trivia quiz for a euro 4,000 prize to take with them when they are sent back to their home country. The one-off show "Weg Van Nederland" (Out Of the Netherlands) shone a satirical light on the plight of young asylum seekers slated for expulsion by Dutch immigration authorities despite having spent most of their childhoods here. A Kurd whose family fled Armenia 11 years ago, won the show by correctly answering questions like, "Who was the first king of the Netherlands?" and artistically carving a map of the Netherlands out of a slab of cheese.( AP Photo/Desmet/Paul Weijenberg) MANDATORY CREDIT
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    Posted: 8/17/2011 6:45:49 PM EST
    Paul Douglas Peters, left, of Sydney, Australia, is escorted from the Federal Courthouse in Louisville, Ky., after he was arraigned in connection with a bomb hoax in Australia, Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2011 (AP Photo/The Courier-Journal, Sam Upshaw Jr.)
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    Posted: 8/17/2011 6:45:49 PM EST
    Paul Douglas Peters, left, of Sydney, Australia, is escorted from the Federal Courthouse in Louisville, Ky., after he was arraigned in connection with a bomb hoax in Australia, Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2011. (AP Photo/The Courier-Journal, Sam Upshaw Jr.)
  •  - File photo of Austrian member of the EU parliament Ernst Strasser

    File photo of Austrian member of the EU parliament Ernst Strasser

    Posted: 3/21/2011 9:36:43 AM EST
    File photo of Austrian member of the EU parliament Ernst Strasser of the People's Party (OeVP) addressing a news conference in Vienna, May 8, 2009. Strasser, who stepped down on March 20, 2011, had admitted to accepting an offer of money by an undercover journalist posing as a lobbyist to put forward amendments to a law. He said he suspected a hoax and maintained that no money had changed hands.REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger/Files (AUSTRIA - Tags: POLITICS HEADSHOT)
  •  - Austrian member of the EU parliament Strasser poses in front of an election poster with his face in Vienna

    Austrian member of the EU parliament Strasser poses in front of an election poster with his face in Vienna

    Posted: 3/21/2011 9:30:29 AM EST
    File photo of Austrian member of the EU parliament Ernst Strasser of the People's Party (OeVP) posing in front of an election poster with his face in Vienna May 11, 2009. Strasser, who stepped down on March 20, 2011, had admitted to accepting an offer of money by an undercover journalist posing as a lobbyist to put forward amendments to a law. He said he suspected a hoax and maintained that no money had changed hands. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader/Files (AUSTRIA - Tags: POLITICS HEADSHOT)


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