heckling Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this May 22, 2006 file photo, Spain's King Juan Carlos arrives with his daughter, Princess Cristina, and her husband, Inaki Urdangarin, for the Laureus World Sports Awards in

    FILE - In this May 22, 2006 file photo, Spain's King Juan Carlos arrives with his daughter, Princess Cristina, and her husband, Inaki Urdangarin, for the Laureus World Sports Awards in

    Posted: 2/22/2013 3:48:24 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 22, 2006 file photo, Spain's King Juan Carlos arrives with his daughter, Princess Cristina, and her husband, Inaki Urdangarin, for the Laureus World Sports Awards in Barcelona, Spain. Urdangarin is accused of having used his position to embezzle several million dollars in public contracts assigned to a nonprofit foundation he set up. The corruption scandal is contributing to the public's diminishing respect for the monarchy. With the 75-year-old king's reputation in decline and several health scares recently, Juan Carlos and the Spanish monarchy are facing one of their biggest crises ever. The last time Juan Carlos appeared in public in front of thousands of people, he was greeted by persistent heckling and whistling never before seen during his reign of nearly four decades. (AP Photo/Jasper Juinen, File)
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              Cecile Duflot, the Housing minister, speaks before France's National Assembly in Paris, Tuesday, July 17, 2012 in this frame made from TV.  The hooting and catcalls began as soon as the

    Cecile Duflot, the Housing minister, speaks before France's National Assembly in Paris, Tuesday, July 17, 2012 in this frame made from TV. The hooting and catcalls began as soon as the

    Posted: 7/24/2012 3:23:22 PM EST
    Cecile Duflot, the Housing minister, speaks before France's National Assembly in Paris, Tuesday, July 17, 2012 in this frame made from TV. The hooting and catcalls began as soon as the Cabinet minister stood, wearing a blue and white flowered dress. It did not cease for the entire time she spoke before France's National Assembly and the heckling came not from an unruly crowd, but from male legislators who later said they were merely showing their appreciation on a warm summer's day. Duflot faltered very slightly, and then continued with her prepared remarks about an urban development project in Paris. "Ladies and gentlemen, but mostly gentlemen, obviously," she said in a firm voice as hoots rang out. She completed the statement on her ministry and again sat down. None of the men in suits who preceded her got the same treatment from the deputies, and the reaction was extraordinary enough to draw television commentary and headlines for days afterward. (AP Photo / National Assembly TV) TV OUT


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