Harold Camping Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 3/9/2012 9:20:51 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 23, 2011 file photo, Harold Camping speaks during a taping of his show Open Forum in Oakland, Calif. Camping, the Northern California preacher whose radio ministry spent millions of dollars last year predicting a fiery apocalypse that failed to materialize has apologized to his followers in an open letter, saying ?we humbly acknowledge we were wrong? and ?we have no new evidence pointing to another date for the end of the world.? (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, file)
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    Posted: 10/21/2011 6:45:46 AM EST
    FILE - Harold Camping speaks during a taping of his show Open Forum in Oakland, Calif., in this May 23, 2011 file photo. The Oakland-based Family Radio International that stirred a global frenzy when it predicted the rapture would take 200 million Christians to heaven on May 21, now says the cataclysmic event will destroy the globe on Friday Oct. 21, 2011. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
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    Posted: 6/13/2011 4:27:14 PM EST
    In this May 23, 2011 photo, Harold Camping speaks during a taping of his show Open Forum in Oakland, Calif. Camping, the California radio preacher who predicted that the end of the world would take place last month, has suffered a stroke. The Oakland Tribune reports that 89-year-old Camping was hospitalized after suffering the stroke Thursday, June 9, 2011, at his Alameda home. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
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    Posted: 5/24/2011 4:05:53 AM EST
    In this photo from May 8, 2011, Christian radio host Harold Camping, right, leads Sunday service at the Veterans Memorial Building in Alameda, Calif. The Christian radio host who predicted the world would end over the weekend said Monday he's ready to talk about why the apocalypse didn't arrive. Harold Camping declined to immediately comment to The Associated Press but said he'll make a full statement in a broadcast through his Oakland-based Family Radio International. (AP Photo/Sprinkle Lab, Brandon Tauszik) MAGS OUT NO ARCHIVE
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    Posted: 5/24/2011 4:05:53 AM EST
    In this photo from May 8, 2011, Christian radio host Harold Camping prepares for Open Forum, a live talk-telephone program broadcast daily on radio and TV, inside the Family Radio compound, in Oakland, Calif. The Christian radio host who predicted the world would end over the weekend said Monday he's ready to talk about why the apocalypse didn't arrive. Harold Camping declined to immediately comment to The Associated Press but said he'll make a full statement in a broadcast through his Oakland-based Family Radio International. (AP Photo/Sprinkle Lab, Brandon Tauszik) MAGS OUT NO ARCHIVE
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    Posted: 5/24/2011 4:05:53 AM EST
    FILE - In a Dec. 12, 2002 file photo, Harold Camping speaks while holding the Bible during his live television broadcast, in San Leandro, Calif. Camping, the Christian radio host who predicted the world would end over the weekend said Monday, May 23, 2011 that he's ready to talk about why the apocalypse didn't arrive. Camping, who previously said there was no possibility the Rapture would not occur at 6 p.m. Saturday, says he'll make a full statement in a broadcast through his Oakland-based Family Radio International. (AP Photo, File)
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    Posted: 5/24/2011 4:05:52 AM EST
    In this photo from Sunday, May 22, 2011, Christian radio host Harold Camping speaks outside of his home in Alameda, Calif. The Christian radio host who predicted the world would end over the weekend said Monday he's ready to talk about why the apocalypse didn't arrive. Harold Camping declined to immediately comment to The Associated Press but said he'll make a full statement in a broadcast through his Oakland-based Family Radio International. (AP Photo/Sprinkle Lab, Brandon Tauszik) MAGS OUT; NO SALES; NO ARCHIVE
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    Posted: 5/24/2011 4:05:52 AM EST
    Harold Camping speaks during a taping of his show "Open Forum" in Oakland, Calif., Monday, May 23, 2011. Camping says his prophecy that the world would end was off by five months because Judgment Day actually will come on October 21. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
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    Posted: 5/24/2011 4:05:52 AM EST
    Harold Camping speaks during a taping of his show "Open Forum" in Oakland, Calif., Monday, May 23, 2011. Camping says his prophecy that the world would end was off by five months because Judgment Day actually will come on October 21. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez
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    Posted: 5/22/2011 6:35:50 PM EST
    FILE - In this Saturday, May 21, 2011 photo, members of the Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas appear at the closed Family Radio station offices of Harold Camping in Oakland, Calif., to offer support to victims of the radio evangelist, who claimed that the ascension into heaven of the Christian faithful would happen on Saturday. The curious buildup that came after Camping used math to predict that Saturday would begin the rolling global destruction of Judgment Day, ended with no discernible apocalyptic events. (AP Photo/Dino Vournas, File)
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    Posted: 5/22/2011 6:35:50 PM EST
    FILE - In this Saturday, May 21, 2011 file photo, David Kirk, Carlos Munoz and Pete Erwin, with his Jesus figure, gather in front of the closed radio station offices of evangelist Harold Camping along with others, to celebrate irreverently, the non-destruction of the world predicted by Camping, in Oakland, Calif. The curious buildup that came after Camping used math to predict that Saturday would begin the rolling global destruction of Judgment Day, ended with no discernible apocalyptic events. (AP Photo/Dino Vournas, File)
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    Posted: 5/22/2011 8:25:59 AM EST
    Members of the Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas appear at the closed Family Radio station offices of Harold Camping to offer support to victims of the radio evangelist, who claimed that the ascension into heaven of the Christian faithful would happen today, Saturday, May 21, 2011 in Oakland, Calif.. (AP Photo/Dino Vournas)
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    Posted: 5/22/2011 8:25:59 AM EST
    Members of the Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas appear at the closed Family Radio station offices of Harold Camping to offer support to victims of the radio evangelist, who claimed that the ascension into heaven of the Christian faithful would happen today, Saturday, May 21, 2011 in Oakland, Calif.. (AP Photo/Dino Vournas)
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    Posted: 5/22/2011 8:25:56 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2002 file photo, Harold Camping speaks while holding the Bible, in San Leandro, Calif. A loosely organized Christian movement has spread the word around the globe that Jesus Christ will return to earth on Saturday, May 21, 2011, to gather the faithful into heaven. While the Christian mainstream isn't buying it, many other skeptics are believing it. The prediction originates with Camping, the 89-year-old retired civil engineer, who founded Family Radio Worldwide, an independent ministry that has broadcasted his prediction around the world. (AP Photo, File)
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    Posted: 5/22/2011 8:25:55 AM EST
    Pastor Jacob Denys, left, rallies his Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas members to appear at the closed Family Radio station offices of Harold Camping to offer support to victims of the radio evangelist, who claimed that the ascension into heaven of the Christian faithful would happen today, Saturday, May 21, 2011 in Oakland, Calif.. (AP Photo/Dino Vournas)
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    Posted: 5/18/2011 9:41:03 PM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2002 file photo, Harold Camping speaks while holding the Bible, in San Leandro, Calif. A loosely organized Christian movement has spread the word around the globe that Jesus Christ will return to earth on Saturday, May 21, 2011, to gather the faithful into heaven. While the Christian mainstream isn't buying it, many other skeptics are believing it. The prediction originates with Camping, the 89-year-old retired civil engineer, who founded Family Radio Worldwide, an independent ministry that has broadcasted his prediction around the world. (AP Photo, File)