Gulf Oil Spill Photos on Townhall

  •  - Handout file photo shows a Greenpeace campaigner walking through a patch of oil from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill on a breakwater in the mouth of the Mississippi River where it meets the Gulf

    Handout file photo shows a Greenpeace campaigner walking through a patch of oil from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill on a breakwater in the mouth of the Mississippi River where it meets the Gulf

    Posted: 4/15/2011 2:00:51 PM EST
    Greenpeace Senior Campaigner Lindsey Allen walks through a patch of oil from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill on a breakwater in the mouth of the Mississippi River where it meets the Gulf of Mexico in Louisiana in this May 18, 2010 handout file photo. When BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico last April, killing 11 workers, authorities first reported that no crude was leaking into the ocean. They were wrong. One year on, oil from the largest spill in U.S. history clogs wetlands, pollutes the ocean and endangers wildlife, not to mention the toll it has inflicted on the coastal economies of Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and especially Louisiana. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANNIVERSARY DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - Handout file photo shows dark clouds of smoke and fire emerging as oil burns during a controlled fire of the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico

    Handout file photo shows dark clouds of smoke and fire emerging as oil burns during a controlled fire of the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico

    Posted: 4/15/2011 2:00:41 PM EST
    Dark clouds of smoke and fire emerge as oil burns during a controlled fire of the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in this May 6, 2010 handout file photo. When BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico last April, killing 11 workers, authorities first reported that no crude was leaking into the ocean. They were wrong. One year on, oil from the largest spill in U.S. history clogs wetlands, pollutes the ocean and endangers wildlife, not to mention the toll it has inflicted on the coastal economies of Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and especially Louisiana. REUTERS/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Justin Stumberg-US Navy/Handout/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANNIVERSARY BUSINESS DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - File photo shows oil booms as they reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, while oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico

    File photo shows oil booms as they reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, while oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico

    Posted: 4/15/2011 2:00:36 PM EST
    Oil booms are seen as they reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, while oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico in this May 1, 2010 file photo. When BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico last April, killing 11 workers, authorities first reported that no crude was leaking into the ocean. They were wrong. One year on, oil from the largest spill in U.S. history clogs wetlands, pollutes the ocean and endangers wildlife, not to mention the toll it has inflicted on the coastal economies of Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and especially Louisiana. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANNIVERSARY BUSINESS DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Handout file photo shows fire boat response crews battling the blazing remnants of BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig at the site of the gulf oil spill off Louisiana

    Handout file photo shows fire boat response crews battling the blazing remnants of BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig at the site of the gulf oil spill off Louisiana

    Posted: 4/15/2011 2:00:26 PM EST
    Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig at the site of the gulf oil spill off Louisiana in this April 21, 2010 handout file photo. When BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico last April, killing 11 workers, authorities first reported that no crude was leaking into the ocean. They were wrong. One year on, oil from the largest spill in U.S. history clogs wetlands, pollutes the ocean and endangers wildlife, not to mention the toll it has inflicted on the coastal economies of Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and especially Louisiana. REUTERS/U.S. Coast Guard/Handout/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANNIVERSARY BUSINESS DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - File photo shows a tri-colored heron covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill along Queen Bess Island near Grand Isle, Louisiana

    File photo shows a tri-colored heron covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill along Queen Bess Island near Grand Isle, Louisiana

    Posted: 4/15/2011 2:00:14 PM EST
    A tri-colored heron covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill is pictured along Queen Bess Island near Grand Isle, Louisiana in this July 17, 2010 file photo. When BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico last April, killing 11 workers, authorities first reported that no crude was leaking into the ocean. They were wrong. One year on, oil from the largest spill in U.S. history clogs wetlands, pollutes the ocean and endangers wildlife, not to mention the toll it has inflicted on the coastal economies of Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and especially Louisiana. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS ANNIVERSARY BUSINESS DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - File photo shows Greenpeace activists painting over a banner with the BP logo in Vienna, during a protest against the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico

    File photo shows Greenpeace activists painting over a banner with the BP logo in Vienna, during a protest against the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico

    Posted: 4/15/2011 2:00:09 PM EST
    Greenpeace activists paint over a banner with the British Petroleum (BP) logo at St. Stephen's square in Vienna, during a protest against the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in this July 7, 2010 file photo. When BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico last April, killing 11 workers, authorities first reported that no crude was leaking into the ocean. They were wrong. One year on, oil from the largest spill in U.S. history clogs wetlands, pollutes the ocean and endangers wildlife, not to mention the toll it has inflicted on the coastal economies of Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and especially Louisiana. REUTERS/Lisi Niesner/Files (AUSTRIA - Tags: ANNIVERSARY BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - File still image from video shows gas and oil leaking at the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill site in the Gulf of Mexico

    File still image from video shows gas and oil leaking at the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill site in the Gulf of Mexico

    Posted: 4/15/2011 1:59:59 PM EST
    Gas and oil continue to leak at the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill site in the Gulf of Mexico in this file still image from a June 24, 2010 BP live video feed. When BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico last April, killing 11 workers, authorities first reported that no crude was leaking into the ocean. They were wrong. One year on, oil from the largest spill in U.S. history clogs wetlands, pollutes the ocean and endangers wildlife, not to mention the toll it has inflicted on the coastal economies of Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and especially Louisiana. REUTERS/BP/Handout/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANNIVERSARY BUSINESS DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - File photo shows dead porgy fish lying stuck in oil from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill in Bay Jimmy near Port Sulpher, Louisiana

    File photo shows dead porgy fish lying stuck in oil from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill in Bay Jimmy near Port Sulpher, Louisiana

    Posted: 4/15/2011 1:59:55 PM EST
    Dead porgy fish lie stuck in oil from the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill in Bay Jimmy near Port Sulpher, Louisiana in this June 20, 2010 file photo. When BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico last April, killing 11 workers, authorities first reported that no crude was leaking into the ocean. They were wrong. One year on, oil from the largest spill in U.S. history clogs wetlands, pollutes the ocean and endangers wildlife, not to mention the toll it has inflicted on the coastal economies of Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and especially Louisiana. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: ANIMALS ANNIVERSARY BUSINESS DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Posted: 6/8/2010 12:13:08 PM EST
    President Obama listens during a briefing about the situation along the Gulf Coast following the BP oil spill, at the Coast Guard Venice Center, in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. Photo released June 7, 2010. REUTERS/Pete Souza/The White House
  •  - Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Posted: 6/8/2010 11:53:23 AM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (C) listens during a briefing about the situation along the Gulf Coast following the BP oil spill, at the Coast Guard Venice Center, in Venice, Louisiana, in this White House handout photo taken on May 2, 2010 and released on June 7, 2010. Picture taken May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Pete Souza/The White House
  •  - Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Posted: 6/8/2010 11:51:09 AM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (C) listens during a briefing about the situation along the Gulf Coast following the BP oil spill, at the Coast Guard Venice Center, in Venice, Louisiana, in this White House handout photo taken on May 2, 2010 and released on June 7, 2010. Picture taken May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Pete Souza/The White House
  •  - Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Posted: 6/8/2010 6:34:54 AM EST
    President Barack Obama (C) listens during a briefing about the situation along the Gulf Coast following the BP oil spill, at the Coast Guard Venice Center, in Venice, Louisiana, in this White House handout photo taken on May 2, 2010 and released on June 7, 2010. REUTERS/Pete Souza/The White House
  •  - Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Posted: 6/8/2010 1:18:52 AM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (C) listens during a briefing about the situation along the Gulf Coast following the BP oil spill, at the Coast Guard Venice Center, in Venice, Louisiana, in this White House handout photo taken on May 2, 2010 and released on June 7, 2010. Picture taken May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Pete Souza/The White House
  •  - Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill while aboard Air Force One en route to Louisiana

    Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill while aboard Air Force One en route to Louisiana

    Posted: 6/7/2010 5:00:46 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama listens during a briefing on the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, while aboard Air Force One en route to New Orleans, Louisiana, in this White House handout photo taken on May 2, 2010 and released on June 7, 2010. Picture taken May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Pete Souza/The White House (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT ENERGY DISASTER) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Handout of U.S. President Obama being briefed on Gulf oil spill in Venice

    Posted: 6/7/2010 4:59:09 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (C) listens during a briefing about the situation along the Gulf Coast following the BP oil spill, at the Coast Guard Venice Center, in Venice, Louisiana, in this White House handout photo taken on May 2, 2010 and released on June 7, 2010. Picture taken May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Pete Souza/The White House (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT ENERGY DISASTER) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - U.S. President Obama speaks to the press following a meeting on the gulf oil spill in New Orleans

    U.S. President Obama speaks to the press following a meeting on the gulf oil spill in New Orleans

    Posted: 6/4/2010 3:59:30 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (C) sits among officials as he speaks to the press following their meeting to assess the response to damage from the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, at New Orleans Airport June 4, 2010. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement alongside Graham and Reilly at the White House

    U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement alongside Graham and Reilly at the White House

    Posted: 6/1/2010 12:48:34 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (C) delivers a statement on the Mexican Gulf oil spill alongside co-chairmen of the BP Deepwater Horizon Disaster Inquiry Commission Bob Graham (L) and William Reilly in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, June 1, 2010. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - NASA's Terra satellite image of the Gulf oil spill taken on Saturday

    NASA's Terra satellite image of the Gulf oil spill taken on Saturday

    Posted: 5/24/2010 9:48:17 PM EST
    NASA's Terra satellite image captured as it flew over the Gulf oil spill during its orbit on May 22, 2010 at 17:00 UTC (1 pm EDT). The oil slick (top left) is located southeast of the Mississippi Delta and appears as a dull gray color. Some high clouds (white) float over the northern extent of the spill. REUTERS/NASA/Goddard/Terra / Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - Glob of oil thought to be from Gulf oil spill sits on a reed on beach in Southwest Pass, Louisiana

    Glob of oil thought to be from Gulf oil spill sits on a reed on beach in Southwest Pass, Louisiana

    Posted: 5/15/2010 10:07:18 PM EST
    A glob of oil thought to be from the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico sits on a reed on a beach in Southwest Pass, Louisiana May 15, 2010. REUTERS/Lee Celano
  •  - Glob of oil thought to be from Gulf oil spill sits on a reed on beach in Southwest Pass, Louisiana

    Glob of oil thought to be from Gulf oil spill sits on a reed on beach in Southwest Pass, Louisiana

    Posted: 5/15/2010 9:09:30 PM EST
    A glob of oil thought to be from the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico sits on a reed on a beach in Southwest Pass, Louisiana May 15, 2010. For over three weeks roughly 5,000 barrels (210,000 gallons/795,000 liters) of oil per day have been gushing from BP's broken Deepwater oil well situated in the Gulf of Mexico, in what could be named the worst oil spill in U.S. History. REUTERS/Lee Celano (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)