Great Recession Photos on Townhall

  •  - 
              In this Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, photo, employees work at a shipping area of Generac Power Systems, Inc., one of the largest makers of residential generators in the U.S., in Whitewater, W

    In this Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, photo, employees work at a shipping area of Generac Power Systems, Inc., one of the largest makers of residential generators in the U.S., in Whitewater, W

    Posted: 12/3/2012 11:23:26 AM EST
    In this Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, photo, employees work at a shipping area of Generac Power Systems, Inc., one of the largest makers of residential generators in the U.S., in Whitewater, Wis. A survey shows U.S. manufacturing shrank in November to its weakest level since July 2009, the first month after the Great Recession ended. Worries about automatic tax increases in the New Year cut demand for factory orders and manufacturing jobs. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
  •  - 
              In this Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, photo, an employee works at a shipping area of Generac Power Systems, Inc., one of the largest makers of residential generators in the U.S., in Whitewater

    In this Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, photo, an employee works at a shipping area of Generac Power Systems, Inc., one of the largest makers of residential generators in the U.S., in Whitewater

    Posted: 12/3/2012 11:23:26 AM EST
    In this Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, photo, an employee works at a shipping area of Generac Power Systems, Inc., one of the largest makers of residential generators in the U.S., in Whitewater, Wis. A survey shows U.S. manufacturing shrank in November to its weakest level since July 2009, the first month after the Great Recession ended. Worries about automatic tax increases in the New Year cut demand for factory orders and manufacturing jobs. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this file photograph taken Feb. 23, 2009, a foreclosure sign blows in the wind in front of a home under foreclosure in Antioch, Calif. More than 1.5 million older Americans al

    FILE - In this file photograph taken Feb. 23, 2009, a foreclosure sign blows in the wind in front of a home under foreclosure in Antioch, Calif. More than 1.5 million older Americans al

    Posted: 7/19/2012 3:28:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this file photograph taken Feb. 23, 2009, a foreclosure sign blows in the wind in front of a home under foreclosure in Antioch, Calif. More than 1.5 million older Americans already have lost their homes, with millions more at risk as the national housing crisis takes its toll on those who are among the worst positioned to weather the storm, a new AARP report says. Older African Americans and Hispanics are the hardest hit. "The Great Recession has been brutal for many older Americans," said Debra Whitman, AARP's policy chief. "This shows that home ownership doesn't guarantee financial security later in life." (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:47 PM EST
    This Wednesday, June 13, 2012 photo shows Michael Bobic, who lost his job as a political science professor at West Virginia Wesleyan College in 2011, outside the Galilean Baptist Church in White Hall, W.Va., where he teaches a money management course. When the government reported that the Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the figure alarmed economists. But for families across the country, the numbers merely confirm that they are not alone. (AP Photo/Vicki Smith)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:47 PM EST
    This Friday, June 15, 2012 photo shows Kathy Miller, president of Total Event Resources, at her offices in Schaumburg, Ill. In 2008, her events planning company was having its best year ever. She and her husband had set aside money to put their two sons through college, with enough left in savings for "a very nice life" in the Chicago suburb. Then the financial crisis sent the stock market tumbling and the corporate customers who had kept Miller's company busy, stopped calling. When the government reported that the Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the figure alarmed economists. But for families across the country, the numbers merely confirm that they are not alone. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:47 PM EST
    In this Thursday, June 14, 2012 photo, Mike Lamm talks with his wife Tracey in the showroom of his jewelry shop in Mediapolis, Iowa. These days, people aren?t buying much jewelry. What saves him is his ability to repair watches and make rings. There?s still enough call for that kind of work in the small town in rural southeastern Iowa. When the government reported that the Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the figure alarmed economists. But for families across the country, the numbers merely confirm that they are not alone. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:47 PM EST
    In this Thursday, June 14, 2012 photo, Mike Lamm works on a ring in his jewelry shop in Mediapolis, Iowa. These days, people aren?t buying much jewelry. What saves him is his ability to repair watches and make rings. There?s still enough call for that kind of work in the small town in rural southeastern Iowa. When the government reported that the Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the figure alarmed economists. But for families across the country, the numbers merely confirm that they are not alone. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:47 PM EST
    This Thursday, June 14, 2012 photo shows Mike Lamm with his wife, Tracey, daughter Raeann and son Ethan in the showroom of his jewelry shop in Mediapolis, Iowa. Even working 65 to 75 hours a week, Mike is bringing in less than he did last year. They have little saved for their children's college. At best, they hope to help pay off their student loans. But they hold on to hopes, if not for themselves, then at least for their kids. When the government reported that the Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the figure alarmed economists. But for families across the country, the numbers merely confirm that they are not alone. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:47 PM EST
    In this Friday, June 15, 2012 photo, Kathy Miller, president of Total Event Resources, poses for a photograph next to trophies awarded to her company in her offices in Schaumburg, Ill. In 2008, her events planning company was having its best year ever. She and her husband had set aside money to put their two sons through college, with enough left in savings for "a very nice life" in the Chicago suburb. Then the financial crisis sent the stock market tumbling and the corporate customers who had kept Miller's company busy, stopped calling. When the government reported that the Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the figure alarmed economists. But for families across the country, the numbers merely confirm that they are not alone. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:46 PM EST
    In this Wednesday, June 13, 2012 photo, Michael Bobic teaches a money management course in White Hall, W.Va. Bobic lost his job as a political science professor at West Virginia Wesleyan College in 2011. When the government reported that the Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the figure alarmed economists. But for families across the country, the numbers merely confirm that they are not alone. (AP Photo/Vicki Smith)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:46 PM EST
    Patricia Jackson sifts through bank documents as a picture of her daughter Nakawe sits on the desk in their home Saturday, June 16, 2012, in Marietta, Ga. On a suburban cul-de-sac northwest of Atlanta, the Jacksons are struggling to keep a house worth $100,000 less than they owe. Their voices and those of many others tell the story of a country that, for all the economic turmoil of the past few years, continues to believe things will get better. But until it does, families are trying to hang on to what they've got left. The Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the Federal Reserve reported last week. The new figures, showing Americans' net worth has plunged back to what it was in 1992, left economists shuddering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:46 PM EST
    Michael, left, and Patricia Jackson sift through bank documents in their home Saturday, June 16, 2012, in Marietta, Ga. On a suburban cul-de-sac northwest of Atlanta, the Jacksons are struggling to keep a house worth $100,000 less than they owe. Their voices and those of many others tell the story of a country that, for all the economic turmoil of the past few years, continues to believe things will get better. But until it does, families are trying to hang on to what they've got left. The Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the Federal Reserve reported last week. The new figures, showing Americans' net worth has plunged back to what it was in 1992, left economists shuddering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:46 PM EST
    A verse hangs on the wall as Michael Jackson heads downstairs of his home Saturday, June 16, 2012, in Marietta, Ga. On a suburban cul-de-sac northwest of Atlanta, the Jacksons are struggling to keep a house worth $100,000 less than they owe. Their voices and those of many others tell the story of a country that, for all the economic turmoil of the past few years, continues to believe things will get better. But until it does, families are trying to hang on to what they've got left. The Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the Federal Reserve reported last week. The new figures, showing Americans' net worth has plunged back to what it was in 1992, left economists shuddering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:46 PM EST
    Michael, left, and Patricia Jackson stand in their bedroom after sifting through bank documents in their home Saturday, June 16, 2012, in Marietta, Ga. On a suburban cul-de-sac northwest of Atlanta, the Jacksons are struggling to keep a house worth $100,000 less than they owe. Their voices and those of many others tell the story of a country that, for all the economic turmoil of the past few years, continues to believe things will get better. But until it does, families are trying to hang on to what they've got left. The Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the Federal Reserve reported last week. The new figures, showing Americans' net worth has plunged back to what it was in 1992, left economists shuddering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:46 PM EST
    Patricia Jackson sifts through bank documents in the bedroom of her home Saturday, June 16, 2012, in Marietta, Ga. On a suburban cul-de-sac northwest of Atlanta, the Jacksons are struggling to keep a house worth $100,000 less than they owe. Their voices and those of many others tell the story of a country that, for all the economic turmoil of the past few years, continues to believe things will get better. But until it does, families are trying to hang on to what they've got left. The Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the Federal Reserve reported last week. The new figures, showing Americans' net worth has plunged back to what it was in 1992, left economists shuddering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:46 PM EST
    Michael, left, and Patricia Jackson are photographed in their home Saturday, June 16, 2012, in Marietta, Ga. On a suburban cul-de-sac northwest of Atlanta, the Jacksons are struggling to keep a house worth $100,000 less than they owe. Their voices and those of many others tell the story of a country that, for all the economic turmoil of the past few years, continues to believe things will get better. But until it does, families are trying to hang on to what they've got left. The Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the Federal Reserve reported last week. The new figures, showing Americans' net worth has plunged back to what it was in 1992, left economists shuddering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:46 PM EST
    Michael, left, and Patricia Jackson are photographed in their home Saturday, June 16, 2012, in Marietta, Ga. On a suburban cul-de-sac northwest of Atlanta, the Jacksons are struggling to keep a house worth $100,000 less than they owe. Their voices and those of many others tell the story of a country that, for all the economic turmoil of the past few years, continues to believe things will get better. But until it does, families are trying to hang on to what they've got left. The Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the Federal Reserve reported last week. The new figures, showing Americans' net worth has plunged back to what it was in 1992, left economists shuddering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:45 PM EST
    A prayer in a frame hangs on the wall as Patricia Jackson sifts through bank documents in her home Saturday, June 16, 2012, in Marietta, Ga. On a suburban cul-de-sac northwest of Atlanta, the Jacksons are struggling to keep a house worth $100,000 less than they owe. Their voices and those of many others tell the story of a country that, for all the economic turmoil of the past few years, continues to believe things will get better. But until it does, families are trying to hang on to what they've got left. The Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the Federal Reserve reported last week. The new figures, showing Americans' net worth has plunged back to what it was in 1992, left economists shuddering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/17/2012 1:15:45 PM EST
    Michael, left, and Patricia Jackson are photographed in their home Saturday, June 16, 2012, in Marietta, Ga. On a suburban cul-de-sac northwest of Atlanta, the Jacksons are struggling to keep a house worth $100,000 less than they owe. Their voices and those of many others tell the story of a country that, for all the economic turmoil of the past few years, continues to believe things will get better. But until it does, families are trying to hang on to what they've got left. The Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the Federal Reserve reported last week. The new figures, showing Americans' net worth has plunged back to what it was in 1992, left economists shuddering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
  •  -

    Posted: 6/16/2012 4:35:47 PM EST
    A prayer hangs on the wall as Patricia Jackson sifts through bank documents in her home Saturday, June 16, 2012, in Marietta, Ga. On a suburban cul-de-sac northwest of Atlanta, the Jacksons are struggling to keep a house worth $100,000 less than they owe. Their voices and those of many others tell the story of a country that, for all the economic turmoil of the past few years, continues to believe things will get better. But until it does, families are trying to hang on to what they've got left. The Great Recession claimed nearly 40 percent of Americans' wealth, the Federal Reserve reported last week. The new figures, showing Americans' net worth has plunged back to what it was in 1992, left economists shuddering. (AP Photo/David Goldman)