Government Intervention Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at the General Motors Orion assembly plant in Orion Township, Mich. The U.S. government said Wednesday, D

    FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at the General Motors Orion assembly plant in Orion Township, Mich. The U.S. government said Wednesday, D

    Posted: 12/19/2012 3:33:23 PM EST
    FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at the General Motors Orion assembly plant in Orion Township, Mich. The U.S. government said Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012, that it will sell its remaining stake in General Motors in the next year or so, winding down a $50 billion bailout that saved the iconic American car giant but also set off a heated debate about government intervention in private business that influenced this year’s presidential election. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
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              FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at the General Motors Orion assembly plant in Orion Township, Mich. The U.S. government said Wednesday, D

    FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at the General Motors Orion assembly plant in Orion Township, Mich. The U.S. government said Wednesday, D

    Posted: 12/19/2012 12:43:26 PM EST
    FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at the General Motors Orion assembly plant in Orion Township, Mich. The U.S. government said Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012, that it will sell its remaining stake in General Motors in the next year or so, winding down a $50 billion bailout that saved the iconic American car giant but also set off a heated debate about government intervention in private business that influenced this year’s presidential election. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
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              FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, file photo, General Motors Co. CEO Daniel Akerson sits in the driver's seat of a 2011 Chevrolet Camaro parked in front of the New York Stock Exch

    FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, file photo, General Motors Co. CEO Daniel Akerson sits in the driver's seat of a 2011 Chevrolet Camaro parked in front of the New York Stock Exch

    Posted: 12/19/2012 12:43:26 PM EST
    FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, file photo, General Motors Co. CEO Daniel Akerson sits in the driver's seat of a 2011 Chevrolet Camaro parked in front of the New York Stock Exchange following GM's initial public offering. The U.S. government said Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012, that it will sell its remaining stake in General Motors in the next year or so, winding down a $50 billion bailout that saved the iconic American car giant but also set off a heated debate about government intervention in private business that influenced this year’s presidential election. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  •  - To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/

    To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/

    Posted: 2/16/2012 9:25:52 AM EST
    Dr Steven Weinberger, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive of the American College of Physicians (ACP), holds a book in his office at the ACP building in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania February 15, 2012. A leading group of U.S. doctors is trying to tackle the costly problem of excessive medical testing, hoping to avoid more government intervention in how they practice. The ACP, the largest U.S. medical specialty group, is rolling out guidelines to help doctors better identify when patients should screen for specific diseases and when they can be spared the cost, and potentially invasive procedures, that follow. Picture taken February 15, 2012. To match Feature HEALTH -OVERTREATMENT/ REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH)
  •  - To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/

    To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/

    Posted: 2/16/2012 9:20:41 AM EST
    Dr Steven Weinberger, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive of the American College of Physicians (ACP), holds a book in his office at the ACP building in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania February 15, 2012. A leading group of U.S. doctors is trying to tackle the costly problem of excessive medical testing, hoping to avoid more government intervention in how they practice. The ACP, the largest U.S. medical specialty group, is rolling out guidelines to help doctors better identify when patients should screen for specific diseases and when they can be spared the cost, and potentially invasive procedures, that follow. Picture taken February 15, 2012. To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/ REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH PROFILE)
  •  - To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/

    To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/

    Posted: 2/16/2012 9:19:24 AM EST
    Dr Steven Weinberger, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive of the American College of Physicians (ACP), sits in his office at the ACP building in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania February 15, 2012. A leading group of U.S. doctors is trying to tackle the costly problem of excessive medical testing, hoping to avoid more government intervention in how they practice. The ACP, the largest U.S. medical specialty group, is rolling out guidelines to help doctors better identify when patients should screen for specific diseases and when they can be spared the cost, and potentially invasive procedures, that follow. Picture taken February 15, 2012. To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/ REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH)
  •  - To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/

    To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/

    Posted: 2/16/2012 9:11:33 AM EST
    Dr Steven Weinberger, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive of the American College of Physicians (ACP), sits in his office at the ACP building in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania February 15, 2012. A leading group of U.S. doctors is trying to tackle the costly problem of excessive medical testing, hoping to avoid more government intervention in how they practice. The ACP, the largest U.S. medical specialty group, is rolling out guidelines to help doctors better identify when patients should screen for specific diseases and when they can be spared the cost, and potentially invasive procedures, that follow. Picture taken February 15, 2012. To match Feature HEALTH-OVERTREATMENT/ REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH)
  •  - To match Feature HEALTH/OVERTREATMENT

    To match Feature HEALTH/OVERTREATMENT

    Posted: 2/16/2012 9:08:39 AM EST
    Dr Steven Weinberger, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive of the American College of Physicians (ACP), holds a book in his office at the ACP building in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania February 15, 2012. A leading group of U.S. doctors is trying to tackle the costly problem of excessive medical testing, hoping to avoid more government intervention in how they practice. The ACP, the largest U.S. medical specialty group, is rolling out guidelines to help doctors better identify when patients should screen for specific diseases and when they can be spared the cost, and potentially invasive procedures, that follow. Picture taken February 15, 2012. To match Feature HEALTH/OVERTREATMENT REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH PROFILE)
  •  - Richard Fuld testifies before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission for a hearing about extraordinary government intervention and the recent financial crisis, on Capitol Hill in Washington

    Richard Fuld testifies before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission for a hearing about extraordinary government intervention and the recent financial crisis, on Capitol Hill in Washington

    Posted: 9/8/2011 8:09:06 PM EST
    Former Lehman Brothers Chairman and CEO Richard Fuld testifies before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission for a hearing about extraordinary government intervention and the recent financial crisis, on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 1, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair at a Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission hearing in Washington

    FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair at a Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission hearing in Washington

    Posted: 12/14/2010 5:40:25 PM EST
    Federal Deposit Insurance Corp (FDIC) Chairman Sheila Bair testifies at a Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission hearing on "Too Big to Fail: Expectations and Impact of Extraordinary Government Intervention and the role of Systemic Risk in the Financial Crisis," on Capitol Hill in Washington September 2, 2010. REUTERS/Molly Riley
  •  - Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben Bernanke testifies at a Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission hearing in Washington

    Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben Bernanke testifies at a Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission hearing in Washington

    Posted: 9/2/2010 10:39:59 AM EST
    Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben Bernanke testifies at a Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission hearing on "Too Big to Fail: Expectations and Impact of Extraordinary Government Intervention and the role of Systemic Risk in the Financial Crisis," on Capitol Hill in Washington September 2, 2010. REUTERS/Molly Riley (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Fuld is sworn in before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission in Washington

    Fuld is sworn in before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission in Washington

    Posted: 9/1/2010 1:14:43 PM EST
    Former Lehman Brothers Chairman and CEO Richard Fuld is sworn in before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission for a hearing about extraordinary government intervention and the recent financial crisis, on Capitol Hill, September 1, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  - Ukrainian trade unions stage a mass rally in central Kiev

    Ukrainian trade unions stage a mass rally in central Kiev

    Posted: 9/9/2009 7:33:27 AM EST
    REFILE - CAPTION ADDITION Ukrainian trade unions stage a mass rally to criticise the lack of government intervention amid the economic crisis and demand wages back from employers in central Kiev September 9, 2009. About four percent of the working population are owed a total of $200 million in wage arrears, official data showed on August 1. The poster in front reads "Bosses - pay us!" REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE POLITICS CONFLICT)
  •  - Customers are seen inside one of the branches of mortgage company Amlak in Dubai

    Customers are seen inside one of the branches of mortgage company Amlak in Dubai

    Posted: 11/23/2008 7:20:44 AM EST
    Customers are seen inside one of the branches of mortgage company Amlak in Dubai November 23, 2008. Amlak and Tamweel, two of the United Arab Emirates' largest mortgage lenders, already on track to merge, will be brought under a government-owned bank, the UAE finance ministry said on Sunday, in the first sign of federal government intervention in Dubai's troubled property sector. REUTERS/Jumana El Heloueh (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES)
  •  - Aboriginal rights protesters demonstrate outside old Parliament House in Canberra

    Aboriginal rights protesters demonstrate outside old Parliament House in Canberra

    Posted: 2/11/2008 11:59:02 PM EST
    Aboriginal rights protesters demonstrate against federal government intervention in Aboriginal affairs in the Northern Territory outside old Parliament House in Canberra February 12, 2008. Aborigines playing didgeridoos and smeared with white body paint overturned hundreds of years of British tradition in Australia on Tuesday by taking part in the official opening of the nation's new parliamentary session. REUTERS/Mick Tsikas (AUSTRALIA)