Government Corruption Photos on Townhall

  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:46 AM EST
    People protest following the removal of fuel subsidy by the government in Lagos , Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:46 AM EST
    People protest following the removal of fuel subsidy by the Government in Lagos ,Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:46 AM EST
    People protest following the removal of fuel subsidy by the Government in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:46 AM EST
    People protest following the removal of fuel subsidy by the Government in Lagos ,Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:46 AM EST
    People protest following the removal of fuel subsidy by the Government in Lagos ,Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:46 AM EST
    People protest following the removal of fuel subsidy by the Government in Lagos ,Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:46 AM EST
    People protest following the removal of fuel subsidy by the Government in Lagos ,Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:46 AM EST
    People protest following the removal of fuel subsidy by the Government in Lagos ,Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 10:10:45 AM EST
    People protest past policemen following the removal of fuel subsidy by the Government in Lagos ,Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Labor unions began a paralyzing national strike Monday in oil-rich Nigeria, angered by soaring fuel prices and decades of engrained government corruption in Africa's most populous nation. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  -
    Posted: 7/4/2011 3:06:01 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 24, 2011 file photo, children hold onto a banner as they join protesters demanding an end to government corruption during a demonstration by opposition parties in front of the prime minister's office in Amman, Jordan. The unrest of the Arab Spring has thrown much of the Middle East into turmoil, but a handful of countries have found ways to prevent or calm the anger of the streets. At the heart of the political standoff in Jordan is a half-British king and darling of Western governments who is trying to avoid the tumult. Arabic writings reads, "Jordan National opposition." (AP Photo/Nader Daoud, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 7/4/2011 3:06:01 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 24, 2011 file photo, supporters of the Communist Party hold banners demanding cancellation of the sales tax during a demonstration by opposition parties demanding an end to government corruption in front of the prime minister's office in Amman, Jordan. White placard on right reads, "People want the stolen money back." The unrest of the Arab Spring has thrown much of the Middle East into turmoil, but a handful of countries have found ways to prevent or calm the anger of the streets. At the heart of the political standoff in Jordan is a half-British king and darling of Western governments who is trying to avoid the tumult. (AP Photo/ Nader Daoud, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 7/4/2011 3:06:00 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 24, 2011 file photo, protesters shout slogans demanding an end to government corruption during a demonstration by opposition parties in front of the prime minister's office in Amman, Jordan. The unrest of the Arab Spring has thrown much of the Middle East into turmoil, but a handful of countries have found ways to prevent or calm the anger of the streets. At the heart of the political standoff in Jordan is a half-British king and darling of Western governments who is trying to avoid the tumult. (AP Photo/Nader Daoud, File)
  •  - To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    Posted: 6/18/2011 10:00:14 PM EST
    A girl selling peanuts and mangoes watches the hip-hop group Y'en a marre during a community concert in the impoverished Dalifort neighbourhood of Senegal's capital Dakar, June 18 2011. With nearly 40 local chapters formed across the country since January, "Y'en a marre" is focusing on encouraging youths who have turned 18 since the last election in 2007 to register for the February 2012 vote -- and to vote against incumbent Abdoulaye Wade. Using a mix of concerts, demonstrations and stomping the streets in black T-shirts emblazoned with their name, the group has been hard at work raising youth awareness of government corruption and mismanagement -- and urging Senegalese to act instead of just complain over cups of 'ataya' tea. Picture taken June 18, 2011. To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/ REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (SENEGAL - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS IMAGES OF THE DAY)
  •  - To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    Posted: 6/18/2011 9:33:10 PM EST
    Members of the hip-hop group Y'en a marre perform during a community concert in the Dalifort neighbourhood of Senegal's capital Dakar, June 18, 2011. With nearly 40 local chapters formed across the country since January, "Y'en a marre" is focusing on encouraging youths who have turned 18 since the last election in 2007 to register for the February 2012 vote -- and to vote against incumbent Abdoulaye Wade. Using a mix of concerts, demonstrations and stomping the streets in black T-shirts emblazoned with their name, the group has been hard at work raising youth awareness of government corruption and mismanagement -- and urging Senegalese to act instead of just complain over cups of 'ataya' tea. Picture taken June 18, 2011. To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/ REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (SENEGAL - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS)
  •  - To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    Posted: 6/18/2011 9:32:17 PM EST
    Baba Soumare, 23, a member of the hip-hop group Y'en a marre, poses for a portrait in his home neighbourhood of Dalifort in Senegal's capital Dakar, June 18 2011. With nearly 40 local chapters formed across the country since January, "Y'en a marre" is focusing on encouraging youths who have turned 18 since the last election in 2007 to register for the February 2012 vote -- and to vote against incumbent Abdoulaye Wade. Using a mix of concerts, demonstrations and stomping the streets in black T-shirts emblazoned with their name, the group has been hard at work raising youth awareness of government corruption and mismanagement -- and urging Senegalese to act instead of just complain over cups of 'ataya' tea. Picture taken June 18, 2011. To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/ REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (SENEGAL - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS)
  •  - To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    Posted: 6/18/2011 9:29:06 PM EST
    A member of the activist hip-hop group Y'en a marre performs during a community concert in the Dalifort neighbourhood of Senegal's capital Dakar, June 18, 2011. With nearly 40 local chapters formed across the country since January, "Y'en a marre" is focusing on encouraging youths who have turned 18 since the last election in 2007 to register for the February 2012 vote -- and to vote against incumbent Abdoulaye Wade. Using a mix of concerts, demonstrations and stomping the streets in black T-shirts emblazoned with their name, the group has been hard at work raising youth awareness of government corruption and mismanagement -- and urging Senegalese to act instead of just complain over cups of 'ataya' tea. Picture taken June 18, 2011. To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/ REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (SENEGAL - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS)
  •  - To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    Posted: 6/18/2011 9:27:50 PM EST
    Boys watch a performance by the hip-hop group Y'en a marre during a community concert in the Dalifort neighbourhood of Senegal's capital Dakar, June 18 2011. With nearly 40 local chapters formed across the country since January, "Y'en a marre" is focusing on encouraging youths who have turned 18 since the last election in 2007 to register for the February 2012 vote -- and to vote against incumbent Abdoulaye Wade. Using a mix of concerts, demonstrations and stomping the streets in black T-shirts emblazoned with their name, the group has been hard at work raising youth awareness of government corruption and mismanagement -- and urging Senegalese to act instead of just complain over cups of 'ataya' tea. Picture taken June 18, 2011. To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/ REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (SENEGAL - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS)
  •  - To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    Posted: 6/18/2011 9:26:43 PM EST
    A member of the hip-hop group Y'en a marre performs during a community concert in the Dalifort neighbourhood of Senegal's capital Dakar, June 18, 2011. With nearly 40 local chapters formed across the country since January, "Y'en a marre" is focusing on encouraging youths who have turned 18 since the last election in 2007 to register for the February 2012 vote -- and to vote against incumbent Abdoulaye Wade. Using a mix of concerts, demonstrations and stomping the streets in black T-shirts emblazoned with their name, the group has been hard at work raising youth awareness of government corruption and mismanagement -- and urging Senegalese to act instead of just complain over cups of 'ataya' tea. Picture taken June 18, 2011. To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/ REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (SENEGAL - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS)
  •  - To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/

    Posted: 6/18/2011 9:25:00 PM EST
    A girl selling peanuts and mangoes watches the hip-hop group Y'en a marre during a community concert in the impoverished Dalifort neighbourhood of Senegal's capital Dakar, June 18 2011. With nearly 40 local chapters formed across the country since January, "Y'en a marre" is focusing on encouraging youths who have turned 18 since the last election in 2007 to register for the February 2012 vote -- and to vote against incumbent Abdoulaye Wade. Using a mix of concerts, demonstrations and stomping the streets in black T-shirts emblazoned with their name, the group has been hard at work raising youth awareness of government corruption and mismanagement -- and urging Senegalese to act instead of just complain over cups of 'ataya' tea. Picture taken June 18, 2011. To match Feature SENEGAL-MUSIC/ REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (SENEGAL - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS)
  •  - New Democratic Party leader Layton stands to speak in the House of Commons in Ottawa

    New Democratic Party leader Layton stands to speak in the House of Commons in Ottawa

    Posted: 12/29/2005 1:51:04 PM EST
    New Democratic Party leader Jack Layton stands to speak in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa November 2, 2005. A major government corruption scandal has damaged the chances of the Liberals winning a majority in an election set for next year, but they should not be completely written off, commentators said on Wednesday. REUTERS/Chris Wattie


TOWNHALL MEDIA GROUP