Global Warming Photos on Townhall

  •  - Steven Tyler, Joey Kramer, Joe Perry and Tom Hamilton of the band Aerosmith arrive for an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Steven Tyler, Joey Kramer, Joe Perry and Tom Hamilton of the band Aerosmith arrive for an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Posted: 3/28/2012 4:58:31 PM EST
    Steven Tyler (L-R), Joey Kramer, Joe Perry and Tom Hamilton of the band Aerosmith arrive for an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles on March 28, 2012. REUTERS/Phil McCarten (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
  •  - Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Posted: 3/28/2012 4:57:01 PM EST
    Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles on March 28, 2012. REUTERS/Phil McCarten (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
  •  - Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Posted: 3/28/2012 4:54:03 PM EST
    Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles on March 28, 2012. REUTERS/Phil McCarten (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
  •  - Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Posted: 3/28/2012 4:53:11 PM EST
    Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles on March 28, 2012. REUTERS/Phil McCarten (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
  •  - Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Posted: 3/28/2012 4:49:42 PM EST
    Steven Tyler of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles on March 28, 2012. REUTERS/Phil McCarten (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
  •  - Tom Hamilton of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Tom Hamilton of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Posted: 3/28/2012 4:43:07 PM EST
    Tom Hamilton of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles March 28, 2012. REUTERS/Phil McCarten (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
  •  - Tom Hamilton of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Tom Hamilton of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles

    Posted: 3/28/2012 4:36:47 PM EST
    Tom Hamilton of the band Aerosmith arrives to an announcement of their Global Warming Tour in Los Angeles March 28, 2012. REUTERS/Phil McCarten (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
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    Posted: 2/28/2012 6:30:55 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 5, 2012 file photo, people walk in the South Chagrin Reservation Metropark on a sunny and mild afternoon in Bentleyville, Ohio. A new poll shows Americans' belief in global warming is on the rise, along with temperatures and surprising weather changes. The survey by the University of Michigan and Muhlenberg College says 62 percent of those asked last December think the Earth is getting warmer. That's an increase from 55 percent in the spring of that year. It's the highest percentage in two years. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)
  •  - File photo of a farmer working on a drought-hit paddy field in the outskirts of Chongqing municipality

    File photo of a farmer working on a drought-hit paddy field in the outskirts of Chongqing municipality

    Posted: 1/17/2012 10:37:23 PM EST
    A farmer works on a drought-hit paddy field in the outskirts of Chongqing municipality in this March 24, 2009 file photo. Global warming threatens China's march to prosperity by cutting crops, shrinking rivers and unleashing more droughts and floods, says the government's latest assessment of climate change, projecting big shifts in how the nation feeds itself. REUTERS/Stringer/Files (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE DISASTER)
  •  - File photo of farmers picking watermelons inside a plastic tent at a flooded field in Kaihua county

    File photo of farmers picking watermelons inside a plastic tent at a flooded field in Kaihua county

    Posted: 1/17/2012 10:35:58 PM EST
    Farmers pick watermelons inside a plastic tent at a flooded field in Kaihua county, Zhejiang province in this June 15, 2011 file photo. Global warming threatens China's march to prosperity by cutting crops, shrinking rivers and unleashing more droughts and floods, says the government's latest assessment of climate change, projecting big shifts in how the nation feeds itself. REUTERS/Lang Lang/Files (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER AGRICULTURE)
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    Posted: 1/12/2012 5:40:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 25, 2007 file photo, a gas well recovering methane gas at a landfill in Ferris, Texas. An international team of scientists say they've figured out how to slow global warming in the short run, prevent millions of deaths from dirty air and increase food production. And it will save more money than it will cost. They say the key is to reduce emissions of two other greenhouse gases instead of carbon dioxide. Those pollutants are methane and soot. Those powerful gases are fast acting so reducing them would pay off quickly. Soot also is a big health problem, so cutting it would save lives. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam, File)
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    Posted: 1/12/2012 5:40:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 15, 2005 photo, methane gas burns off a stack near the Washington Electric Cooperative power plant in Coventry, Vt. An international team of scientists say they've figured out how to slow global warming in the short run, prevent millions of deaths from dirty air and increase food production. And it will save more money than it will cost. They say the key is to reduce emissions of two other greenhouse gases instead of carbon dioxide. Those pollutants are methane and soot. Those powerful gases are fast acting so reducing them would pay off quickly. Soot also is a big health problem, so cutting it would save lives. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)
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    Posted: 1/6/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2011 file photo, a youth uses a makeshift raft to cross a flooded street in the Vila Itaim neighborhood of Sao Paulo, Brazil. From Chile to Colombia to Mexico, Latin America has been battered recently by wildfires, floods and droughts. While leading climate scientists are unable to pin any single flood or heat wave solely on climate change, experts say the number of extreme weather events is increasing worldwide and the evidence suggests global warming is having an impact. (AP Photo/Nelson Antoine, File)
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    Posted: 1/6/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 21, 2011 file photo, a car that was dragged inside a church by a mudslide sits buried in mud in Nova Friburgo, Brazil. From Chile to Colombia to Mexico, Latin America has been battered recently by wildfires, floods and droughts. While leading climate scientists are unable to pin any single flood or heat wave solely on climate change, experts say the number of extreme weather events is increasing worldwide and the evidence suggests global warming is having an impact. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
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    Posted: 1/6/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 16, 2011 file photo, an aerial view shows a neighborhood destroyed by landslides in Nova Friburgo, Brazil. From Chile to Colombia to Mexico, Latin America has been battered recently by wildfires, floods and droughts. While leading climate scientists are unable to pin any single flood or heat wave solely on climate change, experts say the number of extreme weather events is increasing worldwide and the evidence suggests global warming is having an impact. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
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    Posted: 1/6/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 1, 2012 file photo, firefighters work in Torres del Paine National Park in Torres del Paine, Chile. From Chile to Colombia to Mexico, Latin America has been battered recently by wildfires, floods and droughts. While leading climate scientists are unable to pin any single flood or heat wave solely on climate change, experts say the number of extreme weather events is increasing worldwide and the evidence suggests global warming is having an impact. (AP Photo, File)
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    Posted: 1/6/2012 4:15:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2011 file photo, a cow tries to eat from a dried out cactus on a field near the city of Torreon, Mexico. Mexico is seeing the worst drought since 1941, when the country began recording rainfall. From Chile to Colombia to Mexico, Latin America has been battered recently by wildfires, floods and droughts. While leading climate scientists are unable to pin any single flood or heat wave solely on climate change, experts say the number of extreme weather events is increasing worldwide and the evidence suggests global warming is having an impact. (AP Photo/Alberto Puente, File)
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    Posted: 1/6/2012 4:15:47 PM EST
    In this Jan. 20, 2009 file photo, cows lie dead on Hilda Schneider's farm in Stroeder, Argentina. Schneider lost around 500 cows in 2008 due to the drought. From Chile to Colombia to Mexico, Latin America has been battered recently by wildfires, floods and droughts. While leading climate scientists are unable to pin any single flood or heat wave solely on climate change, experts say the number of extreme weather events is increasing worldwide and the evidence suggests global warming is having an impact. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko, File)
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    Posted: 1/6/2012 4:15:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 18, 2005 file photo, a man rows through dead fish floating on Lake Rei during a month long drought near the Amazon town of Careiro da Varzea, Brazil. From Chile to Colombia to Mexico, Latin America has been battered recently by wildfires, floods and droughts. While leading climate scientists are unable to pin any single flood or heat wave solely on climate change, experts say the number of extreme weather events is increasing worldwide and the evidence suggests global warming is having an impact. (AP Photo/Marcio Silva, Agencia Estado, File)
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    Posted: 1/6/2012 4:15:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 12, 2005 file photo, a drought affects the water levels of Anama Lake along the Amazon River, 168 kilometers from Manaus, Brazil. In 2005, the water level of the Amazon dropped by several feet because of a months long drought, halting travel and harming the important fishing industry. From Chile to Colombia to Mexico, Latin America has been battered recently by wildfires, floods and droughts. While leading climate scientists are unable to pin any single flood or heat wave solely on climate change, experts say the number of extreme weather events is increasing worldwide and the evidence suggests global warming is having an impact. (AP Photo/Luiz Vasconcelos, Interfoto, File)