Global Warming Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:46 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, Bergur Sigfusson, the CarbFix experiment's technical manager, surveys Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. CarbFix's scientists will separate carbon dioxide from the volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/18/2011 9:05:49 PM EST
    This image provided by Stanford University biologist Scott Loarie, shows an American Pika in Aug. 2008 in Desolation Wilderness in El Dorado County, Calif., near Lake Tahoe. Animals across the world are fleeing global warming by moving north and up twice as fast as they were less a decade ago, a new study says. About 2000 species examined are moving away from the equator at an average rate of more than 15 feet per day, about a mile per year, according to a giant study of new and old research in the journal Science published Thursday. Species are also moving up mountains to escape the heat, but more slowly, averaging about four feet a year. (AP Photo/Scott Loarie)
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    Posted: 8/15/2011 12:07:30 AM EST
    In this July 15, 2011 photo, during leisure hours, researchers gather atop nearly two miles of ice, at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation, (NSF), situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/15/2011 12:07:29 AM EST
    In this July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two miles of ice, the low night sun illuminates the landscape at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/15/2011 12:07:29 AM EST
    In this July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two miles of ice, technician Marie Mclane launches a data-transmitting weather balloon at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/15/2011 12:07:29 AM EST
    In this July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two miles of ice, small structures dot the landscape at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/15/2011 12:07:27 AM EST
    In this July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two miles of ice, a small laboratory structure bristles with sensors at Summit Station, a remote research center operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/15/2011 12:07:24 AM EST
    In this July 15, 2011 photo, in a trench dug into the 2-mile-thick Greenland ice sheet, researcher Brandon Strellis of Georgia Tech chemically preserves ice samples at Summit Station, a small research center situated at the heart of the vast ice sheet. Across Greenland's white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/15/2011 12:07:20 AM EST
    In this July 17, 2011 photo, on the world's longest ice runway, 16,800 feet long, a logistics worker stands ready to refuel an incoming New York Air National Guard C-130 transport plane mounted with landing skis, at Summit Station, a small research center situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/15/2011 12:07:18 AM EST
    In this July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two miles of ice, with sleeping tents visible in the background, Dartmouth College engineering graduate Suk-Joon Lee helps test a prototype wheeled Arctic robot being developed for long-range instrument deployment, at Summit Station, a small U.S. National Science Foundation research center situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/15/2011 12:07:11 AM EST
    In this July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two miles of ice, researchers and support staff eat a meal inside the "big house" at Summit Station, a small U.S. National Science Foundation research center situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/15/2011 12:07:09 AM EST
    In this July 15, 2011 photo, in freezing temperatures, a researcher walks from an outhouse to the primary facility at Summit Station, a small U.S. National Science Foundation research center situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. The primary facility is periodically jacked up on its support columns to stay above accumulating snow. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/6/2011 11:36:12 AM EST
    Bobby Bailey stands on a ladder as his co-worker, Christopher Bailey, no relation, hands up a solar panel as they complete construction on the O2 Energies solar farm in Newland, N.C., Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011. Of the 11 states that do not set voluntary or mandatory requirements on how much green energy utilities must buy, eight of those states are clustered in the Southeast. Supporters say forcing utilities to buy set amounts of renewable energy helps develop power sources that do not depend on fossil fuels, emit fewer of the gasses blamed for global warming and help create jobs and the development of new technology. Conservative politicians in the Southeast typically oppose government mandates and worry the efforts could raise energy prices in a recession and hurt manufacturing jobs. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
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    Posted: 8/6/2011 11:36:11 AM EST
    In this Aug. 4, 2011 photo, Joel Olsen Jr., managing director of O2 Energies, poses in front of the company's solar panel farm in Newland, N.C. The solar panels occupy six acres of a Christmas Tree Farm that rises up the hill. Of the 11 states that do not set voluntary or mandatory requirements on how much green energy utilities must buy, eight of those states are clustered in the Southeast. Supporters say forcing utilities to buy set amounts of renewable energy helps develop power sources that do not depend on fossil fuels, emit fewer of the gasses blamed for global warming and help create jobs and the development of new technology. Conservative politicians in the Southeast typically oppose government mandates and worry the efforts could raise energy prices in a recession and hurt manufacturing jobs. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
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    Posted: 8/6/2011 11:36:11 AM EST
    The O2 Energies solar panel farm grows in the front six acres of a Christmas tree farm in Newland, N.C., Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011. Of the 11 states that do not set voluntary or mandatory requirements on how much green energy utilities must buy, eight of those states are clustered in the Southeast. Supporters say forcing utilities to buy set amounts of renewable energy helps develop power sources that do not depend on fossil fuels, emit fewer of the gasses blamed for global warming and help create jobs and the development of new technology. Conservative politicians in the Southeast typically oppose government mandates and worry the efforts could raise energy prices in a recession and hurt manufacturing jobs. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
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    Posted: 8/6/2011 11:36:11 AM EST
    Bobby Bailey stretches to tighten a screw that holds a corner of a solar panel at the O2 Energies solar power farm in Newland, N.C., Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011. Of the 11 states that do not set voluntary or mandatory requirements on how much green energy utilities must buy, eight of those states are clustered in the Southeast. Supporters say forcing utilities to buy set amounts of renewable energy helps develop power sources that do not depend on fossil fuels, emit fewer of the gasses blamed for global warming and help create jobs and the development of new technology. Conservative politicians in the Southeast typically oppose government mandates and worry the efforts could raise energy prices in a recession and hurt manufacturing jobs. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
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    Posted: 8/6/2011 11:36:11 AM EST
    During a break in the workday, the construction crew finds refuge from the hot sun under a stand of solar panels at the O2 Energies solar power farm in Newland, N.C., Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011. Of the 11 states that do not set voluntary or mandatory requirements on how much green energy utilities must buy, eight of those states are clustered in the Southeast. Supporters say forcing utilities to buy set amounts of renewable energy helps develop power sources that do not depend on fossil fuels, emit fewer of the gasses blamed for global warming and help create jobs and the development of new technology. Conservative politicians in the Southeast typically oppose government mandates and worry the efforts could raise energy prices in a recession and hurt manufacturing jobs. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
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    Posted: 8/6/2011 11:36:11 AM EST
    In this Aug. 4, 2011 photo, Joel Olsen Jr., managing director of O2 Energies, talks with workers about the installation of the solar panels at the company's solar power farm in Newland, N.C. Of the 11 states that do not set voluntary or mandatory requirements on how much green energy utilities must buy, eight of those states are clustered in the Southeast. Supporters say forcing utilities to buy set amounts of renewable energy helps develop power sources that do not depend on fossil fuels, emit fewer of the gasses blamed for global warming and help create jobs and the development of new technology. Conservative politicians in the Southeast typically oppose government mandates and worry the efforts could raise energy prices in a recession and hurt manufacturing jobs. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
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    Posted: 8/6/2011 11:36:11 AM EST
    Crews complete construction of the solar panel structure at the O2 Energies solar panel farm in Newland, N.C., Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011. Of the 11 states that do not set voluntary or mandatory requirements on how much green energy utilities must buy, eight of those states are clustered in the Southeast. Supporters say forcing utilities to buy set amounts of renewable energy helps develop power sources that do not depend on fossil fuels, emit fewer of the gasses blamed for global warming and help create jobs and the development of new technology. Conservative politicians in the Southeast typically oppose government mandates and worry the efforts could raise energy prices in a recession and hurt manufacturing jobs. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
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    Posted: 7/29/2011 3:11:15 PM EST
    FILE - This undated file photo provided by Subhankar Banerjee shows a polar bear in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska. Federal wildlife biologist Charles Monnett, whose observation that polar bears likely drowned in the Arctic helped galvanize the global warming movement, was placed on administrative leave as officials investigate him for scientific misconduct. Investigators? questions have focused on a 2004 journal article that Monnett wrote about the bears, said thePublic Employees for Environmental Responsibility group that is representing him. Monnett was told July 18 that he was being put on leave, pending an investigation into "integrity issues." (AP Photo/Subhankar Banerjee, File)