Global Warming Photos on Townhall

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    To match Analysis CLIMATE-DEAL/

    Posted: 10/2/2011 11:12:22 AM EST
    Smog covers the city centre of Linfen, China's Shanxi province in this July 7, 2007 file photo. A new plan to curb global warming risks becoming a battleground between rich and poor nations and could struggle to get off the ground as negotiators battle over the fate of the ailing Kyoto climate pact. To match Analysis CLIMATE-DEAL/ REUTERS/Reinhard Krause/Files (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS)
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    To match Analysis CLIMATE-DEAL/

    Posted: 10/2/2011 11:10:34 AM EST
    A general view of Maldives capital Male is seen in this August 13, 2011 file photo. A new plan to curb global warming risks becoming a battleground between rich and poor nations and could struggle to get off the ground as negotiators battle over the fate of the ailing Kyoto climate pact. To match Analysis CLIMATE-DEAL/ REUTERS/David Loh/Files (MALDIVES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS)
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    To match Analysis CLIMATE-DEAL/

    Posted: 10/2/2011 11:06:55 AM EST
    A street lamp is seen in front of the Datong second coal-fired power plant at night on the outskirts of Datong, Shanxi province, in this November 20, 2009 file photo. A new plan to curb global warming risks becoming a battleground between rich and poor nations and could struggle to get off the ground as negotiators battle over the fate of the ailing Kyoto climate pact. To match Analysis CLIMATE-DEAL/ REUTERS/Jason Lee/Files (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
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    Posted: 9/4/2011 5:00:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2011 file photo, Brad Leathers, in window, and Ed Wissner remove items from the destroyed home of Jon Graham, right, after it was destroyed during Tropical Storm Irene in Rochester, Vt. Nature is pummeling the United States in 2011 with extremes. There have been more than 700 U.S. disaster and weather deaths. What's happening, say experts, is mostly random chance or the bad luck of getting the wrong roll of the dice. However, there is something more to it, many of them say. Man-made global warming is loading the dice to increase our odds of getting the bad roll. (AP Photo/The Rutland Herald, Vyto Starinskas, File) MANDATORY CREDIT
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    Posted: 9/4/2011 5:00:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2011 file photo, one of two people rescued from a sailboat, right, uses a line to make their way onto the beach on Willoughby Spit in Norfolk, Va., after a couple and their cat were rescued from the boat that foundered in the waters of the Chesapeake Bay battered by winds from Hurricane Irene. Nature is pummeling the United States in 2011 with extremes. There have been more than 700 U.S. disaster and weather deaths. What's happening, say experts, is mostly random chance or the bad luck of getting the wrong roll of the dice. However, there is something more to it, many of them say. Man-made global warming is loading the dice to increase our odds of getting the bad roll. (AP Photo/TheVirginian-Pilot, Bill Tiernan, File) MAGS OUT
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    Posted: 9/4/2011 5:00:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 11, 2011 file photo, floodwaters surround a building in downtown Vicksburg, Miss. Nature is pummeling the United States in 2011 with extremes. There have been more than 700 U.S. disaster and weather deaths. What's happening, say experts, is mostly random chance or the bad luck of getting the wrong roll of the dice. However, there is something more to it, many of them say. Man-made global warming is loading the dice to increase our odds of getting the bad roll. (AP Photo/Robert Ray, File)
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    Posted: 9/4/2011 5:00:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2011 file photo, sailboats sit on the dry and cracked lake bed at Benbrook Lake in Benbrook, Texas during extreme drought conditions throughout the state. Nature is pummeling the United States in 2011 with extremes. There have been more than 700 U.S. disaster and weather deaths. What's happening, say experts, is mostly random chance or the bad luck of getting the wrong roll of the dice. However, there is something more to it, many of them say. Man-made global warming is loading the dice to increase our odds of getting the bad roll. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)
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    Posted: 9/4/2011 5:00:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2011 file photo, hundreds of cars sit stranded on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago during a winter blizzard. Nature is pummeling the United States in 2011 with extremes. There have been more than 700 U.S. disaster and weather deaths. What's happening, say experts, is mostly random chance or the bad luck of getting the wrong roll of the dice. However, there is something more to it, many of them say. Man-made global warming is loading the dice to increase our odds of getting the bad roll. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)
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    Posted: 9/4/2011 5:00:46 PM EST
    FILE - This May 24, 2011 file photo shows the path of a powerful tornado in Joplin, Mo. Nature is pummeling the United States in 2011 with extremes. There have been more than 700 U.S. disaster and weather deaths. What's happening, say experts, is mostly random chance or the bad luck of getting the wrong roll of the dice. However, there is something more to it, many of them say. Man-made global warming is loading the dice to increase our odds of getting the bad roll. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
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    Posted: 9/4/2011 5:00:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 7, 2011 file photo, a firefighter keeps a lookout on the roof of a house as the Wallow fire approaches Eagar, Ariz. Nature is pummeling the United States in 2011 with extremes. There have been more than 700 U.S. disaster and weather deaths. What's happening, say experts, is mostly random chance or the bad luck of getting the wrong roll of the dice. However, there is something more to it, many of them say. Man-made global warming is loading the dice to increase our odds of getting the bad roll. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
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    Posted: 9/4/2011 5:00:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 25, 2011 file picture, a line of severe storms crosses the Mississippi River in Memphis, Tenn., passing by the Memphis Pyramid. The dark formation was reported a few minutes earlier as a tornado in West Memphis, Ark. Nature is pummeling the United States in 2011 with extremes. There have been more than 700 U.S. disaster and weather deaths. What's happening, say experts, is mostly random chance or the bad luck of getting the wrong roll of the dice. However, there is something more to it, many of them say. Man-made global warming is loading the dice to increase our odds of getting the bad roll. (AP Photo/Lance Murphey, File)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, Bergur Sigfusson, the CarbFix experiment's technical manager, inspects a test well at Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. CarbFix's scientists will separate carbon dioxide from the volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, University of Iceland Ph.D. candidate Iwona Galeczka conducts indoor experiments simulating the CarbFix test planned to begin in September, in Reykjavik, Iceland. CarbFix scientists, at a nearby geothermal plant, will separate carbon dioxide from a volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. Galeczka's key equipment, a plug flow reactor, is the vertical object on the right. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, geologist Sigurdur Reynir Gislason, the CarbFix experiment's chief scientist, holds examples of basalt rock, left, and limestone in his office at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik, Iceland. At a nearby geothermal plant, CarbFix scientists will separate carbon dioxide from a volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    This July 28, 2011, photo shows part of one of four giant turbines inside Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant, fed by steam from the surrounding volcanic field, in Reykjavik, Iceland. Scientists in the CarbFix experiment will separate carbon dioxide from Hellisheidi's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011, photo a complex of pipes, ducts and valves connects to giant turbines inside Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. Scientists in the CarbFix experiment will separate carbon dioxide from the steam in this volcanic field and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, giant ducts carry superheated steam from within a volcanic field to the turbines at Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. Scientists in the CarbFix experiment will separate carbon dioxide from the steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011, photo, superheated steam laden with carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide billow from a test well in the volcanic field at Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. In the CarbFix experiment, scientists will separate out the CO2 and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:47 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, Bergur Sigfusson, the CarbFix experiment's technical manager, checks a valve at a test well at Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. CarbFix's scientists will separate carbon dioxide from the volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:47 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, giant ducts carry superheated steam from within a volcanic field to the turbines at Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. Scientists in the CarbFix experiment will separate carbon dioxide from the steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)