global economy Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 11/30/2011 1:45:46 PM EST
    From left, European Commissioner for the Economy Olli Rehn, Spain's Finance Minister Elena Salgado, Italian Prime Minister and Finance Minister Mario Monti and Luxembourg's Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker pose for a photo during a round table meeting of the eurogroup at the EU Council building in Brussels on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011. The 17 finance ministers of countries that use the euro converged on EU headquarters Tuesday in a desperate bid to save their currency and to protect Europe, the United States, Asia and the rest of the global economy from a debt-induced financial tsunami. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
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    Posted: 11/30/2011 1:45:46 PM EST
    From left, European Commissioner for the Economy Olli Rehn, German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble, Luxembourg's Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker and Italian Prime Minister and Finance Minister Mario Monti greet each other during a round table meeting of the eurogroup at the EU Council building in Brussels on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011. The 17 finance ministers of countries that use the euro converged on EU headquarters Tuesday in a desperate bid to save their currency and to protect Europe, the United States, Asia and the rest of the global economy from a debt-induced financial tsunami. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
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    Posted: 11/30/2011 1:40:46 AM EST
    Italian Prime Minister and Finance Minister Mario Monti, right, meets with Luxembourg's Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker at the EU Council building in Brussels on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011. The 17 finance ministers of countries that use the euro converged on EU headquarters Tuesday in a desperate bid to save their currency and to protect Europe, the United States, Asia and the rest of the global economy from a debt-induced financial tsunami. (AP Photo/Yves Herman, Pool)
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    Posted: 11/30/2011 1:40:46 AM EST
    Italian Prime Minister and Finance Minister Mario Monti takes his seat during a round table meeting of the eurogroup at the EU Council building in Brussels on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011. The 17 finance ministers of countries that use the euro converged on EU headquarters Tuesday in a desperate bid to save their currency and to protect Europe, the United States, Asia and the rest of the global economy from a debt-induced financial tsunami. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
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    Posted: 11/30/2011 1:40:46 AM EST
    Italian Prime Minister and Finance Minister Mario Monti, left, speaks with German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble during a round table meeting of the eurogroup at the EU Council building in Brussels on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011. The 17 finance ministers of countries that use the euro converged on EU headquarters Tuesday in a desperate bid to save their currency and to protect Europe, the United States, Asia and the rest of the global economy from a debt-induced financial tsunami. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
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    Posted: 11/30/2011 1:40:45 AM EST
    Italian Prime Minister and Finance Minister Mario Monti waits for the start of a round table meeting of the eurogroup at the EU Council building in Brussels on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011. The 17 finance ministers of countries that use the euro converged on EU headquarters Tuesday in a desperate bid to save their currency and to protect Europe, the United States, Asia and the rest of the global economy from a debt-induced financial tsunami. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
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    Posted: 11/30/2011 1:40:45 AM EST
    Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos, left, shakes hands with Italian Prime Minister and Finance Minister Mario Monti during a round table meeting of the eurogroup at the EU Council building in Brussels on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011. The 17 finance ministers of countries that use the euro converged on EU headquarters Tuesday in a desperate bid to save their currency and to protect Europe, the United States, Asia and the rest of the global economy from a debt-induced financial tsunami. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
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    Posted: 11/25/2011 8:15:50 AM EST
    In this Nov. 9, 2011, traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Global stocks fell Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011, after more evidence emerged that the global economy is faltering fast and that the eurozone is heading for a recession as the debt crisis spreads to the bigger economies like Italy and Spain.(AP Photo/Richard Drew)
  •  - A reflection of a man crossing a street is seen on a window in Tokyo

    A reflection of a man crossing a street is seen on a window in Tokyo

    Posted: 10/28/2011 12:38:12 AM EST
    A reflection of a man crossing a street is seen on a window in Tokyo October 28, 2011. Japan's jobless rate fell in September and the availability of jobs improved, helped by reconstruction-related demand after the March disaster, but the outlook is murky as corporations may rein in hiring on uncertainty over the global economy and volatile financial markets. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
  •  - A reflection of a man crossing a street is seen on a window in Tokyo

    A reflection of a man crossing a street is seen on a window in Tokyo

    Posted: 10/28/2011 12:38:04 AM EST
    A reflection of a man crossing a street is seen on a window in Tokyo October 28, 2011. Japan's jobless rate fell in September and the availability of jobs improved, helped by reconstruction-related demand after the March disaster, but the outlook is murky as corporations may rein in hiring on uncertainty over the global economy and volatile financial markets. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
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    Posted: 10/20/2011 12:45:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2011 file photo, French President Nicolas Sarkozy, right, reacts to German Chancellor Angela Merkel after a meeting on the financial crisis in Berlin, Germany. Sarkozy promised an "ambitious and humble" year as leader of the Group of 20 rich and developing economies, and he has a lot to be humble about. G-20 finance ministers and central bankers gathering for talks here beginning Friday Oct. 14, 2011 must explain how they let global economy run straight towards the edge of a clearly marked cliff this year, and what, if anything, they can still do to stop from driving off. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
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    Posted: 10/20/2011 6:35:46 AM EST
    In this Monday Oct. 3, 2011 photo Chief Executive Officer Klaus Regling talks during an interview with the Associated Press at the European Financial Stability Facility office in Luxembourg. After the Oct. 23 summit of EU leaders, the EFSF will wield massive financial power to contain the eurozone's debt troubles and keep them from plunging the global economy into another recession and putting thousands of people out of a job.(AP Photo/Yves Logghe)
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    Posted: 10/20/2011 6:35:46 AM EST
    In this Monday Oct. 3, 2011 photo a woman walks past the European Financial Stability Facility office in Luxembourg. After the Oct. 23 summit of EU leaders, the EFSF will wield massive financial power to contain the eurozone's debt troubles and keep them from plunging the global economy into another recession and putting thousands of people out of a job.(AP Photo/Yves Logghe) (AP Photo/Yves Logghe)
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    Posted: 10/20/2011 6:35:46 AM EST
    In this Monday Oct. 3, 2011 photo a view of the entrance of the European Financial Stability Facility office in Luxembourg, is seen Monday Oct. 3, 2011. After the Oct. 23 summit of EU leaders, the EFSF will wield massive financial power to contain the eurozone's debt troubles and keep them from plunging the global economy into another recession and putting thousands of people out of a job.(AP Photo/Yves Logghe)
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    Posted: 10/20/2011 6:35:46 AM EST
    In this Monday Oct. 3, 2011 photo Chief Executive Officer Klaus Regling talks during an interview with the Associated Press at the European Financial Stability Facility office in Luxembourg. After the Oct. 23 summit of EU leaders, the EFSF will wield massive financial power to contain the eurozone's debt troubles and keep them from plunging the global economy into another recession and putting thousands of people out of a job.(AP Photo/Yves Logghe)
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    Posted: 10/20/2011 6:35:45 AM EST
    A man walks past at the entrance of the European Financial Stability Facility office in Luxembourg, Monday Oct. 3, 2011. After the Oct. 23 summit of EU leaders, the EFSF will wield massive financial power to contain the eurozone's debt troubles and keep them from plunging the global economy into another recession and putting thousands of people out of a job.(AP Photo/Yves Logghe)
  •  - Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters during a news conference in Jakarta

    Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters during a news conference in Jakarta

    Posted: 10/11/2011 6:36:57 AM EST
    Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters during a news conference in Jakarta October 11, 2011. Indonesia's central bank unexpectedly cut its benchmark policy rate on Tuesday, the first such move by a G20 economy after Brazil, as it seeks to stimulate domestic demand as global growth slows. Bank Indonesia cut the rate by 25 basis points to a record-low 6.50 percent, saying it expected a weaker global economy to weigh on demand for the country's exports next year. REUTERS/Enny Nuraheni (INDONESIA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters during a news conference in Jakarta

    Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters during a news conference in Jakarta

    Posted: 10/11/2011 6:34:54 AM EST
    Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters during a news conference in Jakarta October 11, 2011. Indonesia's central bank unexpectedly cut its benchmark policy rate on Tuesday, the first such move by a G20 economy after Brazil, as it seeks to stimulate domestic demand as global growth slows. Bank Indonesia cut the rate by 25 basis points to a record-low 6.50 percent, saying it expected a weaker global economy to weigh on demand for the country's exports next year. REUTERS/Enny Nuraheni (INDONESIA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters during a news conference in Jakarta

    Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters during a news conference in Jakarta

    Posted: 10/11/2011 6:33:05 AM EST
    Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters during a news conference in Jakarta October 11, 2011. Indonesia's central bank unexpectedly cut its benchmark policy rate on Tuesday, the first such move by a G20 economy after Brazil, as it seeks to stimulate domestic demand as global growth slows. Bank Indonesia cut the rate by 25 basis points to a record-low 6.50 percent, saying it expected a weaker global economy to weigh on demand for the country's exports next year. REUTERS/Enny Nuraheni (INDONESIA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters after a news conference in Jakarta

    Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters after a news conference in Jakarta

    Posted: 10/11/2011 6:30:34 AM EST
    Indonesia's Central Bank Governor Darmin Nasution speaks to reporters after a news conference in Jakarta October 11, 2011. Indonesia's central bank unexpectedly cut its benchmark policy rate on Tuesday, the first such move by a G20 economy after Brazil, as it seeks to stimulate domestic demand as global growth slows. Bank Indonesia cut the rate by 25 basis points to a record-low 6.50 percent, saying it expected a weaker global economy to weigh on demand for the country's exports next year. REUTERS/Enny Nuraheni (INDONESIA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)


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