Genocide Photos on Townhall

  •  - Former Bosnian Serb army commander Mladic attends his trial at the ICTY at The Hague

    Former Bosnian Serb army commander Mladic attends his trial at the ICTY at The Hague

    Posted: 5/16/2012 3:43:31 AM EST
    Former Bosnian Serb army commander Ratko Mladic attends his trial at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) at The Hague May 16, 2012. Mladic, 70, appeared on Wednesday for his genocide trial looking confident, flashing a thumbs-up and clapping his hands as he entered the courtroom. REUTERS/Toussaint Kluiters/Pool (NETHERLANDS - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW)
  •  - Former Bosnian Serb army commander Mladic attends his trial at the ICTY at The Hague

    Former Bosnian Serb army commander Mladic attends his trial at the ICTY at The Hague

    Posted: 5/16/2012 3:40:57 AM EST
    Former Bosnian Serb army commander Ratko Mladic attends his trial at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) at The Hague May 16, 2012. Mladic, 70, appeared on Wednesday for his genocide trial looking confident, flashing a thumbs-up and clapping his hands as he entered the courtroom. REUTERS/Toussaint Kluiters/Pool (NETHERLANDS - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS)
  •  - Former Bosnian Serb army commander Mladic attends his trial at the ICTY at The Hague

    Former Bosnian Serb army commander Mladic attends his trial at the ICTY at The Hague

    Posted: 5/16/2012 3:38:24 AM EST
    Former Bosnian Serb army commander Ratko Mladic attends his trial at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) at The Hague May 16, 2012. Mladic, 70, appeared on Wednesday for his genocide trial looking confident, flashing a thumbs-up and clapping his hands as he entered the courtroom. REUTERS/Toussaint Kluiters/Pool (NE RLANDS - Tags: CRIME LAW TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
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    Posted: 5/15/2012 12:30:48 PM EST
    In this Wednesday, May 9, 2012 photo Bosnian Muslim woman Munira Subasic reacts during interview to the AP in Sarajevo, Bosnia. She remembers Ratko Mladic looking straight into her eyes and promising to spare the other children. A soldier had just killed a 3-year-old baby because it was crying too loud. She remembers, too, the arrogant swagger as he barked murderous orders to his troops that showed his promise to be a lie. For Munira Subasic, these are the two sides of the Bosnian Serb general who goes on trial Wednesday on genocide charges: the sly deceiver and the ranting bully.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
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    Posted: 5/15/2012 8:15:49 AM EST
    In this Friday, May 11, 2012 photo a man rides a bicycle past the house, where former Bosnian Serb wartime general Ratko Mladic was found one year ago, in the village Lazarevo, about 50 kilometers north of Belgrade, Serbia. Almost a year after Europe's most wanted fugitive was captured in their midst, the residents of this remote village in northern Serbia still pledge their allegiance to the wartime Bosnian Serb army chief accused of genocide and crimes against humanity. All the more so, they say, as Mladic's trial for the 1995 massacre of Muslims in Srebrenica and other atrocities of the Bosnian war, is set to start this week at the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands _ the court most people here view as unjust. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)
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    Posted: 5/15/2012 8:15:48 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, May 9, 2012 photo Bosnian Muslim woman Munira Subasic reacts during interview to the AP in Sarajevo, Bosnia. She remembers Ratko Mladic looking straight into her eyes and promising to spare the other children. A soldier had just killed a 3-year-old baby because it was crying too loud. She remembers, too, the arrogant swagger as he barked murderous orders to his troops that showed his promise to be a lie. For Munira Subasic, these are the two sides of the Bosnian Serb general who goes on trial Wednesday on genocide charges: the sly deceiver and the ranting bully.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
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    Posted: 5/15/2012 8:15:48 AM EST
    In this Friday, May 11, 2012 photo a woman rides a bicycle past the house where former Bosnian Serb wartime general Ratko Mladic was found one year ago, in the village Lazarevo, about 50 kilometers north of Belgrade, Serbia. Almost a year after Europe's most wanted fugitive was captured in their midst, the residents of this remote village in northern Serbia still pledge their allegiance to the wartime Bosnian Serb army chief accused of genocide and crimes against humanity. All the more so, they say, as Mladic's trial for the 1995 massacre of Muslims in Srebrenica and other atrocities of the Bosnian war, is set to start this week at the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands _ the court most people here view as unjust. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)
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    Posted: 5/15/2012 8:15:48 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, May 9, 2012 photo Bosnian Muslim woman Munira Subasic reacts during interview to the AP in Sarajevo, Bosnia. She remembers Ratko Mladic looking straight into her eyes and promising to spare the other children. A soldier had just killed a 3-year-old baby because it was crying too loud. She remembers, too, the arrogant swagger as he barked murderous orders to his troops that showed his promise to be a lie. For Munira Subasic, these are the two sides of the Bosnian Serb general who goes on trial Wednesday on genocide charges: the sly deceiver and the ranting bully.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
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    Posted: 4/25/2012 11:45:49 AM EST
    FILE This Thursday Dec. 21, 2006 file photo shows ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in court while listening to the prosecution, during the Anfal genocide trial in Baghdad, Iraq. Mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik's shocking testimony to a Norwegian court has revived a debate about how much of a public platform mass-murderers should be given in trials. Such atrocities are often waged for attention and carried out in the name of political or religious goals, and a trial gives perpetrators more of what they crave: a huge audience. Mike Newton, co-author of "Enemy of the State: The Trial and Execution of Saddam Hussein," argues that Saddam's trial is a case where there would indeed have been good argument for a closed trial because the deposed Iraqi dictator used his testimony _ broadcast on Iraqi television _ to encourage the ongoing insurgency.(AP Photo / Nikola Solic, pool)
  •  - Armenian Bishop Datev Hagopian attends a wreath laying ceremony after a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, outside the Armenian Church in

    Armenian Bishop Datev Hagopian attends a wreath laying ceremony after a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, outside the Armenian Church in

    Posted: 4/24/2012 10:38:24 AM EST
    Armenian Bishop Datev Hagopian attends a wreath laying ceremony after a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, outside the Armenian Church in Bucharest April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says that about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel that the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION)
  •  - Members of Armenian community in Romania cast shadows during a rally marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in downtown Bucharest

    Members of Armenian community in Romania cast shadows during a rally marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in downtown Bucharest

    Posted: 4/24/2012 10:36:25 AM EST
    Members of Armenian community in Romania cast shadows during a rally marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in downtown Bucharest April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says that about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel that the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION)
  •  - Members of Armenian community in Romania hold banners during a rally marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in downtown Bucharest

    Members of Armenian community in Romania hold banners during a rally marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in downtown Bucharest

    Posted: 4/24/2012 10:33:45 AM EST
    Members of Armenian community in Romania hold banners during a rally marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in downtown Bucharest April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says that about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel that the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION)
  •  - An Armenian priest reads from the Bible during a special prayer marking the anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Bucharest

    An Armenian priest reads from the Bible during a special prayer marking the anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Bucharest

    Posted: 4/24/2012 10:23:16 AM EST
    An Armenian priest reads from the Bible during a special prayer marking the anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Bucharest April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says that about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel that the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION)
  •  - An Armenian priest burns incense during a special prayer marking the anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Bucharest

    An Armenian priest burns incense during a special prayer marking the anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Bucharest

    Posted: 4/24/2012 10:18:38 AM EST
    An Armenian priest burns incense during a special prayer marking the anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Bucharest April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says that about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel that the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION)
  •  - Armenian Bishop Hagopian conducts a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Bucharest

    Armenian Bishop Hagopian conducts a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Bucharest

    Posted: 4/24/2012 10:03:09 AM EST
    Armenian Bishop Datev Hagopian conducts a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Bucharest April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
  •  - People light candles during a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Jerusalem's Old City

    People light candles during a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Jerusalem's Old City

    Posted: 4/24/2012 9:13:40 AM EST
    People light candles during a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Jerusalem's Old City April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun (JERUSALEM - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION)
  •  - People hold attend a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Jerusalem's Old City

    People hold attend a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Jerusalem's Old City

    Posted: 4/24/2012 9:12:18 AM EST
    People hold attend a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Jerusalem's Old City April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun (JERUSALEM - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION)
  •  - A member of the Armenian clergy holds a candle during a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Jerusalem's Old City

    A member of the Armenian clergy holds a candle during a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Jerusalem's Old City

    Posted: 4/24/2012 9:11:00 AM EST
    A member of the Armenian clergy holds a candle during a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Jerusalem's Old City April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun (JERUSALEM - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION)
  •  - Members of the Armenian clergy attend a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Jerusalem's Old City

    Members of the Armenian clergy attend a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Jerusalem's Old City

    Posted: 4/24/2012 9:10:12 AM EST
    Members of the Armenian clergy attend a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Jerusalem's Old City April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun (JERUSALEM - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION)
  •  - A woman attends a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in the Armenian Church in Jerusalem's Old City

    A woman attends a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in the Armenian Church in Jerusalem's Old City

    Posted: 4/24/2012 8:58:53 AM EST
    A woman attends a special prayer marking the anniversary of mass killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire in 1915, in the Armenian Church in Jerusalem's Old City April 24, 2012. Armenia, backed by many historians and parliaments, says about 1.5 million Christian Armenians were killed in what is now eastern Turkey during World War One in a deliberate policy of genocide ordered by the Ottoman government. Successive Turkish governments and the vast majority of Turks feel the charge of genocide is an insult to their nation. Ankara argues that there was heavy loss of life on both sides during fighting in the area. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun (JERUSALEM - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY RELIGION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)