Generosity Photos on Townhall

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              In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, holds his grandson Mohammed in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and

    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, holds his grandson Mohammed in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and

    Posted: 5/3/2013 11:23:33 AM EST
    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, holds his grandson Mohammed in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have each shaken Mohammed al-Farra’s life since he was born in the southern Gaza Strip town of Khan Younis three and a half years ago with a rare genetic disorder that crippled his bowels, weakened his immune system and caused an infection that destroyed his hands and feet. His parents abandoned him and the Palestinian government won’t pay for his care. But his grandfather has raised him instead, and Israeli doctors privately fundraise to cover his medical costs. As a result, the Palestinian toddler calls his grandfather “daddy,” he babbles in a mix of Hebrew and Arabic and the only home he has ever known is the yellow-painted children’s ward. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)
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              In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, walks next to his grandson Mohammed in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generos

    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, walks next to his grandson Mohammed in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generos

    Posted: 5/3/2013 2:28:26 AM EST
    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, walks next to his grandson Mohammed in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have each shaken Mohammed al-Farra’s life since he was born in the southern Gaza Strip town of Khan Younis three and a half years ago with a rare genetic disorder that crippled his bowels, weakened his immune system and caused an infection that destroyed his hands and feet. His parents abandoned him and the Palestinian government won’t pay for his care. But his grandfather has raised him instead, and Israeli doctors privately fundraise to cover his medical costs. As a result, the Palestinian toddler calls his grandfather “daddy,” he babbles in a mix of Hebrew and Arabic and the only home he has ever known is the yellow-painted children’s ward. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)
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              In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, puts his grandson Mohammed in a wheelchair in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment,

    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, puts his grandson Mohammed in a wheelchair in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment,

    Posted: 5/3/2013 2:28:26 AM EST
    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, puts his grandson Mohammed in a wheelchair in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have each shaken Mohammed al-Farra’s life since he was born in the southern Gaza Strip town of Khan Younis three and a half years ago with a rare genetic disorder that crippled his bowels, weakened his immune system and caused an infection that destroyed his hands and feet. His parents abandoned him and the Palestinian government won’t pay for his care. But his grandfather has raised him instead, and Israeli doctors privately fundraise to cover his medical costs. As a result, the Palestinian toddler calls his grandfather “daddy,” he babbles in a mix of Hebrew and Arabic and the only home he has ever known is the yellow-painted children’s ward. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)
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              In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, holds his grandson Mohammed in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and

    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, holds his grandson Mohammed in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and

    Posted: 5/3/2013 2:28:26 AM EST
    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, holds his grandson Mohammed in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have each shaken Mohammed al-Farra’s life since he was born in the southern Gaza Strip town of Khan Younis three and a half years ago with a rare genetic disorder that crippled his bowels, weakened his immune system and caused an infection that destroyed his hands and feet. His parents abandoned him and the Palestinian government won’t pay for his care. But his grandfather has raised him instead, and Israeli doctors privately fundraise to cover his medical costs. As a result, the Palestinian toddler calls his grandfather “daddy,” he babbles in a mix of Hebrew and Arabic and the only home he has ever known is the yellow-painted children’s ward. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)
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              In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian child Mohammed Al-Farra is seen in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have e

    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian child Mohammed Al-Farra is seen in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have e

    Posted: 5/3/2013 2:28:26 AM EST
    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian child Mohammed Al-Farra is seen in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have each shaken Mohammed al-Farra’s life since he was born in the southern Gaza Strip town of Khan Younis three and a half years ago with a rare genetic disorder that crippled his bowels, weakened his immune system and caused an infection that destroyed his hands and feet. His parents abandoned him and the Palestinian government won’t pay for his care. But his grandfather has raised him instead, and Israeli doctors privately fundraise to cover his medical costs. As a result, the Palestinian toddler calls his grandfather “daddy,” he babbles in a mix of Hebrew and Arabic and the only home he has ever known is the yellow-painted children’s ward. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)
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              In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, holds his grandson Mohammed as they speak with Israeli doctor Raz Somech, in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan

    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, holds his grandson Mohammed as they speak with Israeli doctor Raz Somech, in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan

    Posted: 5/3/2013 2:28:26 AM EST
    In this Monday, April 29, 2013 photo, Palestinian Hamouda Al-Farra, holds his grandson Mohammed as they speak with Israeli doctor Raz Somech, in the Tel Hashomer Hospital near Ramat Gan, central Israel. Abandonment, generosity and tragedy have each shaken Mohammed al-Farra’s life since he was born in the southern Gaza Strip town of Khan Younis three and a half years ago with a rare genetic disorder that crippled his bowels, weakened his immune system and caused an infection that destroyed his hands and feet. His parents abandoned him and the Palestinian government won’t pay for his care. But his grandfather has raised him instead, and Israeli doctors privately fundraise to cover his medical costs. As a result, the Palestinian toddler calls his grandfather “daddy,” he babbles in a mix of Hebrew and Arabic and the only home he has ever known is the yellow-painted children’s ward. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)
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              In this photo taken on Saturday, April 20 2013 and released by the Uganda Presidency, Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni, left, and State Minister for Youth and Children Affairs Ronald

    In this photo taken on Saturday, April 20 2013 and released by the Uganda Presidency, Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni, left, and State Minister for Youth and Children Affairs Ronald

    Posted: 4/23/2013 12:18:39 PM EST
    In this photo taken on Saturday, April 20 2013 and released by the Uganda Presidency, Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni, left, and State Minister for Youth and Children Affairs Ronald Kibuule, center, hand over what the president's office said was a sack of money containing 250 million Ugandan shillings - about $100,000 - to an unidentified member of a partisan group of youths, right, in Kaliro district east of the capital Kampala, in Uganda. It’s become an infamous photo in Uganda. The country’s leader looks on in bemusement as a young man bends low to carry a sack filled with a donation from the president _ almost $100,000 in cash. The money is a donation from President Yoweri Museveni to a partisan group of youths in eastern Uganda, where he struggles to win votes in national elections, and activists and opposition politicians are seizing upon the moment as a blatant example of political corruption in Uganda. The picture, which was distributed by the president’s office after the event last weekend, was meant to highlight Museveni’s generosity toward a group of youth. Instead it has focused attention on Museveni’s profligacy during political tours and what some say is his role in fueling graft in the East African country that he has led since 1986. (AP Photo/Uganda Presidency)
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              In this Saturday, Dec. 19, 2009 photo, John Alves, of Dartmouth, Mass., uses a basket while taking collection during Mass at St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church in New Bedford, M

    In this Saturday, Dec. 19, 2009 photo, John Alves, of Dartmouth, Mass., uses a basket while taking collection during Mass at St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church in New Bedford, M

    Posted: 8/20/2012 9:08:28 AM EST
    In this Saturday, Dec. 19, 2009 photo, John Alves, of Dartmouth, Mass., uses a basket while taking collection during Mass at St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church in New Bedford, Mass. A study on the generosity of Americans, released Monday, Aug. 20, 2012, by the Chronicle of Philanthropy, found that states with populations that are less religious are also the stingiest about giving money to charity. (AP Photo/Gretchen Ertl)
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              FILE - In this Aug. 1996 file photo, astronomer Carl Sagan speaks in Washington. The Library of Congress has acquired the personal papers of the late scientist and astronomer Carl Sagan

    FILE - In this Aug. 1996 file photo, astronomer Carl Sagan speaks in Washington. The Library of Congress has acquired the personal papers of the late scientist and astronomer Carl Sagan

    Posted: 6/27/2012 11:38:32 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 1996 file photo, astronomer Carl Sagan speaks in Washington. The Library of Congress has acquired the personal papers of the late scientist and astronomer Carl Sagan, thanks to the generosity of a well-heeled admirer: “Family Guy” creator Seth MacFarlane. The writer, director and actor is working on a follow-up to Sagan’s acclaimed “Cosmos” miniseries, which introduced a mass audience to the mysteries of the universe and the origins of life. MacFarlane says he was profoundly influenced by “Cosmos” and wants to draw attention to the need for continued exploration of space and study of astronomy. (AP Photo/John Duricka, File)
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              This undated handout photo provided by the Library of Congress shows a drawing of "The Evolution of Interstellar Flight" by the young Carl Sagan (c. 10-13 years old).  The Library of Co

    This undated handout photo provided by the Library of Congress shows a drawing of "The Evolution of Interstellar Flight" by the young Carl Sagan (c. 10-13 years old). The Library of Co

    Posted: 6/27/2012 11:38:32 AM EST
    This undated handout photo provided by the Library of Congress shows a drawing of "The Evolution of Interstellar Flight" by the young Carl Sagan (c. 10-13 years old). The Library of Congress has acquired the personal papers of the late scientist and astronomer Carl Sagan, thanks to the generosity of a well-heeled admirer: “Family Guy” creator Seth MacFarlane. The writer, director and actor is working on a follow-up to Sagan’s acclaimed “Cosmos” miniseries, which introduced a mass audience to the mysteries of the universe and the origins of life. MacFarlane says he was profoundly influenced by “Cosmos” and wants to draw attention to the need for continued exploration of space and study of astronomy. (AP Photo/Library of Congress)
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              FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2011 file photo, Seth MacFarlane poses for a portrait in Los Angeles. The Library of Congress has acquired the personal papers of the late scientist and astronome

    FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2011 file photo, Seth MacFarlane poses for a portrait in Los Angeles. The Library of Congress has acquired the personal papers of the late scientist and astronome

    Posted: 6/27/2012 11:38:32 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2011 file photo, Seth MacFarlane poses for a portrait in Los Angeles. The Library of Congress has acquired the personal papers of the late scientist and astronomer Carl Sagan, thanks to the generosity of a well-heeled admirer: “Family Guy” creator Seth MacFarlane. The writer, director and actor is working on a follow-up to Sagan’s acclaimed “Cosmos” miniseries, which introduced a mass audience to the mysteries of the universe and the origins of life. MacFarlane says he was profoundly influenced by “Cosmos” and wants to draw attention to the need for continued exploration of space and study of astronomy. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)