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              FILE - In this Oct. 22, 1984, file photo, President Ronald Reagan, left, and his Democratic challenger Walter Mondale, shake hands prior to their televised presidential debate, in Kansa

    FILE - In this Oct. 22, 1984, file photo, President Ronald Reagan, left, and his Democratic challenger Walter Mondale, shake hands prior to their televised presidential debate, in Kansa

    Posted: 10/1/2012 3:58:24 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 22, 1984, file photo, President Ronald Reagan, left, and his Democratic challenger Walter Mondale, shake hands prior to their televised presidential debate, in Kansas City, Mo. When Reagan won the White House in 1980, he was 69 _ the oldest man ever elected to the office. During his successful 1984 re-election campaign, he faced questions about his age in his head-to-head contest with 56-year-old Walter Mondale, the former vice president. They spend hours mastering policy. Learning to lean on the podium just so. Perfecting the best way to label their opponents as liars without whining. But presidential candidates and their running mates often find that campaign debates turn on unplanned zingers, gaffes or gestures that speak volumes. Debate wins and losses often are scored based on the overall impressions that candidates leave with voters. In the history books, though, small debate moments often end up telling the broader story. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds, File)
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              FILE - In this Oct. 5, 1988, file photo, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, D-Texas, left, shakes hands with Sen. Dan Quayle, R-Ind., before the start of their vice presidential debate at the Omaha Ci

    FILE - In this Oct. 5, 1988, file photo, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, D-Texas, left, shakes hands with Sen. Dan Quayle, R-Ind., before the start of their vice presidential debate at the Omaha Ci

    Posted: 10/1/2012 3:53:26 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 5, 1988, file photo, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, D-Texas, left, shakes hands with Sen. Dan Quayle, R-Ind., before the start of their vice presidential debate at the Omaha Civic Auditorium, Omaha, Neb. They spend hours mastering policy. Learning to lean on the podium just so. Perfecting the best way to label their opponents as liars without whining. But presidential candidates and their running mates often find that campaign debates turn on unplanned zingers, gaffes or gestures that speak volumes. Debate wins and losses often are scored based on the overall impressions that candidates leave with voters. In the history books, though, small debate moments often end up telling the broader story. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)
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              FILE - In this Oct. 15, 1992, file photo President George H.W. Bush looks at his watch during the 1992 presidential campaign debate with other candidates, Independent Ross Perot, top, a

    FILE - In this Oct. 15, 1992, file photo President George H.W. Bush looks at his watch during the 1992 presidential campaign debate with other candidates, Independent Ross Perot, top, a

    Posted: 10/1/2012 3:53:26 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 15, 1992, file photo President George H.W. Bush looks at his watch during the 1992 presidential campaign debate with other candidates, Independent Ross Perot, top, and Democrat Bill Clinton, not shown, at the University of Richmond, Va. They spend hours mastering policy. Learning to lean on the podium just so. Perfecting the best way to label their opponents as liars without whining. But presidential candidates and their running mates often find that campaign debates turn on unplanned zingers, gaffes or gestures that speak volumes. Debate wins and losses often are scored based on the overall impressions that candidates leave with voters. In the history books, though, small debate moments often end up telling the broader story. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds, File)


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