Gadhafi Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 11/20/2011 9:25:50 PM EST
    FILE - In this photo released Feb. 23, 2011 by China's Xinhua News Agency, Seif al-Islam Gadhafi waits before a news conference in Tripoli, Libya, A Libyan militia commander has told reporters at a news conference Saturday Nov. 19, 2011 that Moamar Gadhafi's son Seif al-Islam has been captured in southern Libya. (AP Photo/Xinhua, Hamza Turkia) NO SALES
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    Posted: 11/20/2011 9:25:50 PM EST
    FILE - The Aug. 16, 2007 file photo shows Governor of the Austrian province of Carinthia Joerg Haider, left, walks with Seif al-Islam Gadhafi at Lake Woerthersee in Velden, Carinthia. A Libyan militia commander has told reporters at a news conference Saturday Nov. 19, 2011 that Moamar Gadhafi's son Seif al-Islam has been captured in southern Libya. (AP Photo/Gert Eggenberger)
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    Posted: 11/20/2011 9:25:50 PM EST
    This image from Libyan television and made available by the Libyan Outreach group via Facebook, Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011, purportedly shows Seif al-Islam Gadhafi in custody in an undisclosed location. Moammar Gadhafi's son Seif al-Islam, the only member of the ousted ruling family to remain at large, was captured as he traveled with aides in a convoy in Libya's southern desert, Libyan officials said Saturday. (AP Photo/Libyan TV via Libyan Outreach)
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    Posted: 11/20/2011 9:25:50 PM EST
    Eye glasses belonging to Seif al-Islam Gadhafi are seen after his capture in Zintan, Libya, Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011. The rebels who captured Moammar Gadhafi's son and one-time heir apparent say they will hold him until a court system is set up in Libya and are demanding that he be tried inside the country. Rebels from the western mountain town of Zintan captured Seif al-Islam Saturday in the southern Libyan desert, raising questions about whether they will turn him over to the new transitional government in Tripoli that took power after Gadhafi fell or to the International Criminal Court in the Netherlands, which wants to try him on charges of crimes against humanity.(AP Photo/Abdel Magid al-Fergany)
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    Posted: 11/20/2011 9:25:50 PM EST
    In this image provided by the Zintan Media Center that was taken Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011, revolutionary fighters and onlookers gather around the aircraft that transport Seif al-Islam Gadhafi to Zintan, Libya, following his capture near the Niger border. Moammar Gadhafi's son, the only wanted member of the ousted ruling family to remain at large _ was captured as he traveled with aides in a convoy in Libya's southern desert. (AP Photo / Zintan Media Center,HO) EDITORIAL USE ONLY LOGO MUST BE USED MANDATORY CREDIT
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    Posted: 11/19/2011 2:50:54 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 10, 2011 file photo, Seif al-Islam Gadhafi, son of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, gestures as he speaks to supporters and the media in Tripoli, Libya. A Libyan commander told reporters Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011 that Seif al-Islam Gadhafi has been arrested in south Libya.(AP Photo/Ben Curtis, file)
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    Posted: 11/19/2011 2:50:54 PM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2009 photo, Seif al-Islam Gadhafi is shown in Berlin. A Libyan militia commander has told reporters at a news conference Saturday Nov. 19, 2011 that Moamar Gadhafi's son Seif al-Islam has been captured in southern Libya. (AP Photo/dapd, Michael Kappeler)
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    Posted: 11/19/2011 2:50:54 PM EST
    FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011 file photo, Moammar Gadhafi's son Seif al-Islam makes a victory sign as he appears at the Rixos hotel in Tripoli, Libya. A Libyan commander told reporters Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011 that Seif al-Islam Gadhafi has been arrested in south Libya. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills, File)
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    Posted: 11/19/2011 8:05:47 AM EST
    ADDS DATE OF NEWS CONFERENCE - FILE - Seif al-Islam Gadhafi talks to reporters at the ancient city of Cyrene near the city of al-Bayda, northeastern Libya in this Sept. 10, 2007 file photo. A Libyan militia commander has told reporters at a press conference Saturday Nov. 19, 2011 that Moamar Gadhafi's son Seif al-Islam has been captured in southern Libya. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
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    Posted: 11/19/2011 6:45:47 AM EST
    FILE - Seif al-Islam Gadhafi talks to reporters at the ancient city of Cyrene near the city of al-Bayda, northeastern Libya in this Sept. 10, 2007 file photo. A Libyan militia commander has told reporters at a press conference that Moamar Gadhafi's son Seif al-Islam has been captured in southern Libya. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
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    Posted: 11/10/2011 3:30:53 PM EST
    In this Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 photo, stonework detail on the Severus Septimus Arch at is seen at Leptis Magna, Libya. The breathtaking ruins of this Roman Empire port city may hold the key to a brighter economic future for Libya, which under Moammar Gadhafi was dangerously dependent on oil revenues. The country's new leaders hope to diversify, with tourism and financial services high on their list. Leptis Magna is deserted as Libya emerges from civil war, but it is only one of the North African nation's potential tourist draws. (AP Photo/David Mac Dougall)
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    Posted: 11/10/2011 3:30:53 PM EST
    In this Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 photo, a Roman-era stone columns are seen at Leptis Magna, Libya. The breathtaking ruins of this Roman Empire port city may hold the key to a brighter economic future for Libya, which under Moammar Gadhafi was dangerously dependent on oil revenues. The country's new leaders hope to diversify, with tourism and financial services high on their list. Leptis Magna is deserted as Libya emerges from civil war, but it is only one of the North African nation's potential tourist draws. (AP Photo/David Mac Dougall)
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    Posted: 11/10/2011 3:30:53 PM EST
    In this Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 photo, stonework detail is seen at Leptis Magna, Libya. The breathtaking ruins of this Roman Empire port city may hold the key to a brighter economic future for Libya, which under Moammar Gadhafi was dangerously dependent on oil revenues. The country's new leaders hope to diversify, with tourism and financial services high on their list. Leptis Magna is deserted as Libya emerges from civil war, but it is only one of the North African nation's potential tourist draws. (AP Photo/David Mac Dougall)
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    Posted: 11/10/2011 3:30:53 PM EST
    In this Monday, Nov. 7, 2011 photo, a general view of the Roman theater ruins at Leptis Magna, Libya. The breathtaking ruins of this Roman Empire port city may hold the key to a brighter economic future for Libya, which under Moammar Gadhafi was dangerously dependent on oil revenues. The country's new leaders hope to diversify, with tourism and financial services high on their list. Leptis Magna is deserted as Libya emerges from civil war, but it is only one of the North African nation's potential tourist draws. (AP Photo/David Mac Dougall)
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    Posted: 11/8/2011 3:55:49 PM EST
    Libyan Nadia Seif visits the interrogation wing of Moammar Gadhafi's intelligence service at the Abu Salim prison complex, in Tripoli, Libya Tuesday, Nov.8, 2011. Seif says she was held there for seven months in the late 1990s, mistreated and twice raped by a guard. Seif and others brutalized by the ousted Gadhafi regime now want their tormentors put on trial, but swift justice seems unlikely. (AP Photo/Karin Laub)
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    Posted: 11/6/2011 9:30:50 AM EST
    FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 6, 2011 file photo, Matthew VanDyke, a writer and filmmaker from Baltimore, Md. who has joined with revolutionary fighters, is seen on the front line in Sirte, Libya. VanDyke was freed from Libya's most notorious prison in August during the turmoil of the uprising against Moammar Gadhafi after his capture in March by government soldiers. The American writer is returning home Saturday after spending more than five months in solitary confinement in Libyan prisons, then joining the rebel forces who opposed dictator Moammar Gadhafi. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo, File)
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    Posted: 11/3/2011 3:15:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2011 file photo, a man suspected of being a Gadhafi loyalist shows wounds on his feet at a detention facility in Misrata, Libya. Dozens of relatives of jailed Moammar Gadhafi loyalists protested outside a Tripoli prison Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011, alleging detainees were being mistreated by former rebel fighters now in charge of the lockup. A Libyan official, Mahmoud Shammam, said most prisons are still under the control of semi-autonomous groups of fighters, not the interim government. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo, File)
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    Posted: 11/3/2011 3:15:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2011 file photo, a man suspected of being a Gadhafi loyalist prays in a detention facility in Misrata, Libya. Dozens of relatives of jailed Moammar Gadhafi loyalists protested outside a Tripoli prison Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011, alleging detainees were being mistreated by former rebel fighters now in charge of the lockup. A Libyan official, Mahmoud Shammam, said most prisons are still under the control of semi-autonomous groups of fighters, not the interim government. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo, File)
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    Posted: 11/3/2011 3:15:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2011 file photo, a woman suspected of being a Gadhafi loyalist is seen behind bars inside a detention facility in Misrata, Libya. Dozens of relatives of jailed Moammar Gadhafi loyalists protested outside a Tripoli prison Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011, alleging detainees were being mistreated by former rebel fighters now in charge of the lockup. A Libyan official, Mahmoud Shammam, said most prisons are still under the control of semi-autonomous groups of fighters, not the interim government. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo, File)
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    Posted: 11/3/2011 3:15:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2011 file photo, suspected Gadhafi loyalists are seen in a detention facility in Misrata, Libya. Dozens of relatives of jailed Moammar Gadhafi loyalists protested outside a Tripoli prison Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011, alleging detainees were being mistreated by former rebel fighters now in charge of the lockup. A Libyan official, Mahmoud Shammam, said most prisons are still under the control of semi-autonomous groups of fighters, not the interim government. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo, File)