foreign intelligence surveillance act Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - in this July 10, 2008, file photo President George W. Bush is applauded after signing the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) at the White House in Washington. The Forei

    FILE - in this July 10, 2008, file photo President George W. Bush is applauded after signing the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) at the White House in Washington. The Forei

    Posted: 6/16/2013 9:33:30 AM EST
    FILE - in this July 10, 2008, file photo President George W. Bush is applauded after signing the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) at the White House in Washington. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court hears cases inside vaults in a federal courthouse. Legal justifications are classified, there's no lawyer countering the government's case for authority and the decisions are rarely made public. In one step toward openness, the Obama administration has disclosed some secret legal opinions, but only those from Bush's previous administration, like the treatment of terrorist detainees. From left are, Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, obscured, Vice President Dick Cheney, Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn., the president, and House Minority Leader John Boehner of Ohio. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds, File)
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              Mark Klein holds up documents while posing for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court

    Mark Klein holds up documents while posing for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:56:30 AM EST
    Mark Klein holds up documents while posing for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spread government eavesdropping, there was Mark Klein _ a San Francisco telecommunications technician who alleged that AT&T was allowing government spies to siphon vast amounts of customer data without warrants. Armed with Klein’s allegations, lawyers representing consumers upset with what they called an illegal government invasion of their privacy filed a high-profile lawsuit seeking to invalidate the same provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the center of the latest public outcry. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
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              Mark Klein looks through documents while interviewed at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court docume

    Mark Klein looks through documents while interviewed at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court docume

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:56:30 AM EST
    Mark Klein looks through documents while interviewed at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spread government eavesdropping, there was Mark Klein _ a San Francisco telecommunications technician who alleged that AT&T was allowing government spies to siphon vast amounts of customer data without warrants. Armed with Klein’s allegations, lawyers representing consumers upset with what they called an illegal government invasion of their privacy filed a high-profile lawsuit seeking to invalidate the same provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the center of the latest public outcry. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
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              Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spre

    Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spre

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:56:30 AM EST
    Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spread government eavesdropping, there was Mark Klein _ a San Francisco telecommunications technician who alleged that AT&T was allowing government spies to siphon vast amounts of customer data without warrants. Armed with Klein’s allegations, lawyers representing consumers upset with what they called an illegal government invasion of their privacy filed a high-profile lawsuit seeking to invalidate the same provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the center of the latest public outcry. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
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              Mark Klein holds up documents while posing for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court

    Mark Klein holds up documents while posing for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:33:54 AM EST
    Mark Klein holds up documents while posing for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spread government eavesdropping, there was Mark Klein _ a San Francisco telecommunications technician who alleged that AT&T was allowing government spies to siphon vast amounts of customer data without warrants. Armed with Klein’s allegations, lawyers representing consumers upset with what they called an illegal government invasion of their privacy filed a high-profile lawsuit seeking to invalidate the same provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the center of the latest public outcry. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
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              Mark Klein looks through documents while interviewed at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court docume

    Mark Klein looks through documents while interviewed at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court docume

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:33:54 AM EST
    Mark Klein looks through documents while interviewed at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spread government eavesdropping, there was Mark Klein _ a San Francisco telecommunications technician who alleged that AT&T was allowing government spies to siphon vast amounts of customer data without warrants. Armed with Klein’s allegations, lawyers representing consumers upset with what they called an illegal government invasion of their privacy filed a high-profile lawsuit seeking to invalidate the same provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the center of the latest public outcry. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
  •  - 
              Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spre

    Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spre

    Posted: 6/12/2013 3:33:54 AM EST
    Mark Klein poses for photographs at his home in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Before there was Edward Snowden and the leaking of an explosive court document showing wide-spread government eavesdropping, there was Mark Klein _ a San Francisco telecommunications technician who alleged that AT&T was allowing government spies to siphon vast amounts of customer data without warrants. Armed with Klein’s allegations, lawyers representing consumers upset with what they called an illegal government invasion of their privacy filed a high-profile lawsuit seeking to invalidate the same provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the center of the latest public outcry. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)