Foreign Aid Photos on Townhall

  •  - To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    Posted: 12/7/2011 9:16:26 AM EST
    An opposition fighter stands outside a shop in the southern Yemeni city of Taiz November 17, 2011. A deal to remove Yemen's leader from power may pave the way for flows of desperately needed foreign aid into the country, after aid slowed to a trickle this year because of political violence. Ten months of unrest demanding the removal of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, and deteriorating security around the country, have deterred international donors from providing help needed to finance food imports and government operations. Picture taken November 17, 2011. To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/ REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah (YEMEN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    Posted: 12/7/2011 9:16:14 AM EST
    A street vendor prepares sweets as he waits for customers at a street market in Sanaa November 22, 2011. A deal to remove Yemen's leader from power may pave the way for flows of desperately needed foreign aid into the country, after aid slowed to a trickle this year because of political violence. Ten months of unrest demanding the removal of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, and deteriorating security around the country, have deterred international donors from providing help needed to finance food imports and government operations. Picture taken November 22, 2011. To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/ REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah (YEMEN - Tags: BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST POLITICS FOOD SOCIETY)
  •  - To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    Posted: 12/7/2011 9:16:03 AM EST
    People walk at a street market in Sanaa November 22, 2011. A deal to remove Yemen's leader from power may pave the way for flows of desperately needed foreign aid into the country, after aid slowed to a trickle this year because of political violence. Ten months of unrest demanding the removal of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, and deteriorating security around the country, have deterred international donors from providing help needed to finance food imports and government operations. Picture taken November 22, 2011. To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah (YEMEN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST BUSINESS SOCIETY)
  •  - To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    Posted: 12/7/2011 9:15:52 AM EST
    Street vendors chat at a market in Sanaa November 22, 2011. A deal to remove Yemen's leader from power may pave the way for flows of desperately needed foreign aid into the country, after aid slowed to a trickle this year because of political violence. Ten months of unrest demanding the removal of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, and deteriorating security around the country, have deterred international donors from providing help needed to finance food imports and government operations. Picture taken November 22, 2011. To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/ REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah (YEMEN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST BUSINESS SOCIETY)
  •  - To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    Posted: 12/7/2011 9:15:41 AM EST
    A man carrying his son walks past street vendors' stalls at a market in Sanaa November 22, 2011. A deal to remove Yemen's leader from power may pave the way for flows of desperately needed foreign aid into the country, after aid slowed to a trickle this year because of political violence. Ten months of unrest demanding the removal of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, and deteriorating security around the country, have deterred international donors from providing help needed to finance food imports and government operations. Picture taken November 22, 2011. To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/ REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah (YEMEN - Tags: BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY POLITICS)
  •  - To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/

    Posted: 12/7/2011 9:15:29 AM EST
    A street vendor selling raisins waits for customers at a street market in Sanaa November 22, 2011. A deal to remove Yemen's leader from power may pave the way for flows of desperately needed foreign aid into the country, after aid slowed to a trickle this year because of political violence. Ten months of unrest demanding the removal of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, and deteriorating security around the country, have deterred international donors from providing help needed to finance food imports and government operations. Picture taken November 22, 2011. To match Analysis YEMEN-ECONOMY/ REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah (YEMEN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST BUSINESS SOCIETY FOOD)
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    Posted: 12/1/2011 1:00:47 PM EST
    Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad during an interview with the Associated Press in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011. Fayyad said Thursday he wants to reduce the Palestinians' reliance on foreign aid drastically in the coming year and hopes to be able to pay for all day-to-day operations of his government by 2013. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)
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    Posted: 12/1/2011 1:00:47 PM EST
    Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad speaks during an interview with the Associated Press in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011. Fayyad said Thursday he wants to reduce the Palestinians' reliance on foreign aid drastically in the coming year and hopes to be able to pay for all day-to-day operations of his government by 2013. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)
  •  - Sahrawi policemen stand guard at the entrance of a compound where foreign aid workers live in Tindouf

    Sahrawi policemen stand guard at the entrance of a compound where foreign aid workers live in Tindouf

    Posted: 10/23/2011 12:40:48 PM EST
    Sahrawi policemen stand guard at the entrance of a compound of a refugee camp where foreign aid workers live in Tindouf October 23, 2011. Sahrawi authorities are searching for the kidnappers of two Spanish aid workers and an Italian who were abducted from the compound of the camp near Tindouf in western Algeria overnight, according to a press release and statement by officials on Sunday. REUTERS/Handout/Stringer (ALGERIA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - Foreign aid workers talk inside a compound of a refugee camp where the workers live in Tindouf

    Foreign aid workers talk inside a compound of a refugee camp where the workers live in Tindouf

    Posted: 10/23/2011 12:40:07 PM EST
    Foreign aid workers talk inside a compound of a refugee camp where the workers live in Tindouf October 23, 2011. Sahrawi authorities are searching for the kidnappers of two Spanish aid workers and an Italian who were abducted from the compound of the camp near Tindouf in western Algeria overnight, according to a press release and statement by officials on Sunday. REUTERS/Handout/Stringer (ALGERIA - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:51:47 AM EST
    Children play on pipes used to pump sand to fill Boeung Kak Lake, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project, in front of the Council of Ministers building in Phnom Penh in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE POLITICS)
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:50:21 AM EST
    A boy is seen through a pipe used to pump sand to fill Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE POLITICS)
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:49:04 AM EST
    People are seen behind a demolished house at the Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION POLITICS REAL ESTATE)
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:47:17 AM EST
    Children cool off in the waters of Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE POLITICS)
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:46:10 AM EST
    A girl walks on a pipe used to pump sand to fill Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE POLITICS)
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:44:16 AM EST
    People cast fishing nets near pipes used to pump out sand to fill Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS REAL ESTATE)
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:42:40 AM EST
    People ride on a moped past a demolished house at Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION POLITICS)
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 8/31/2011 8:41:25 PM EST
    A boy runs as tyres burn in the background during a protest at the Boeung Kak lake area in Phnom Penh, by residents facing eviction after they were denied land promised to them in return for making way for a Chinese development project in this August 23, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST POLITICS REAL ESTATE)
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 8/31/2011 8:30:08 PM EST
    Residents of Boeung Kak Lake facing eviction from their homes, react during a protest near the Chinese embassy in Phnom Penh, appealing for help in getting fair compensation from a Chinese firm involved in a real estate development at the lake in this January 17, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST POLITICS REAL ESTATE)
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    Posted: 6/24/2011 10:35:50 PM EST
    In this photo taken June 20, 2011, a woman walkspast a temporary houses at a refugee camp set up for people displaced by the January 2010 in Carrefour, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The structure is one of hundreds of wooden frames with steel or plywood roofs that foreign aid groups erected as a temporary fix for people displaced by the January 2010 earthquake, a way station between squalid tent camps and the new homes that would one day be built for the displaced. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)